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Peer-to-Peer file sharing Windows 10 Home

I'm working on a Windows 10 Home "file server" which is at the latest update.
I've seen Windows updates change the state of "Turn off password protected sharing" to "Turn on password protected sharing".  Now I'm trying to figure out which of the two settings is appropriate for the existing and working setup.  I'm actually not sure that it matters but figured that someone would know better than I.

It appears that the system was set up to "match" username/password.
Every user has a user profile on this computer.
The file share and security is for Everyone wil full privileges.
"Everyone" of course only means anyone with a user profile on this machine - by definition.

So, given that this is the setup, what's the difference between  
"Turn off password protected sharing"
and
 "Turn on password protected sharing"
Does it matter?
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Fred Marshall
Asked:
Fred Marshall
1 Solution
 
Emmanuel AdebayoGlobal Windows Infrastructure Engineer - ConsultantCommented:
If password protected sharing is "on", only people who have your user account and password can access your shared files, folders and printers. To give others direct access, you turn off password protected sharing "off"
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Fred MarshallPrincipalAuthor Commented:
Emmanuel Adebayo:  Yes, I have read that in the documentation.  Perhaps I wasn't clear:

If password protected sharing is "off", will it interfere with file sharing for people who:
1) have a user profile on the "server"
2) are logged into the same username/password as that user profile on a remote workstation?

That is, will things behave differently FOR THEM?

Presumably, the "normal" situation for this case would be:
Turn ON password protected sharing.

Does it even matter what that setting is for this situation?
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
create a homegroup
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masnrockCommented:
I believe that it would not affect your particular case, because each machine needing to access has the needed credentials. Now had it been a case of trying to access anonymously, then it would obviously be a different story altogether.
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