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.ADM Files be Deleted to save some disk space?

Posted on 2016-10-14
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Last Modified: 2016-11-03
Hello experts,
Can .adm files templates be deleted from sysvol to save some disk space?
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Question by:IT_Admin XXXX
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by:awawada
awawada earned 100 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41844242
If you don't want them anymore, yes. How many space can you save by deleting them?
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by:efrimpol
ID: 41844245
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by:awawada
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ID: 41844257
I would also use a Tool like Windirstat portable or TreeSiz to free space.
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Rich Weissler earned 200 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41844266
Yes. Implemented a Central Store, ensure you don't have down level clients clients performing management changes (i.e. hopefully you don't still have XP machines floating around, especially not where administrators are modifying group policies), and take a look to make certain you aren't relying on the ADM files.  Okay, that last one is a bit of a cheat -- but if your environment has been around for a while, you could have old group policies built with ADM files, which don't have equivalent ADMX files available.

I'd suggest looking at the ADM removal script in the technet gallery.  It'll back things up by default, and be used with the -whatif parameter, and you can restore ADM files that it turns out you need.  (Try it in a test environment, if possible.)

How much space can you reclaim?  Usually a few kilobytes per old group policy you have in your environment.  It's not a huge amount of space in most cases, but it's stuff you then don't need to replicate...
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by:loftyworm
loftyworm earned 100 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41844309
IMO
Yes, but you prob do not want to.  They should not b taking up that much space, and if they are, then I would expect some bad/old GPO's
There are better ways to clean space, as mentioned above.
My personal fav, is search the entire drive and sort by file size, you will quickly learn where all the large files are at.

my ¢2
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by:Niten Kumar
ID: 41844422
Best would be run disk cleanup to clear out temporary files.  If it is a virtual machine then you can always extend the hard drive size. .ADM files might have been used in some of your GPO's.
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by:Adam Brown
Adam Brown earned 100 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41844426
The ADM template store doesn't usually take up enough space to make a big difference. The default PolicyDefinition store in Windows is like 7MB worth of files, and the store I have on my test network is 150MB, including a ton of custom ADMX files. I don't see how deleting those would be even remotely useful for clearing space on the drive.

I would recommend looking elsewhere for things to clear up space. For instance, C:\Windows\logs sometimes has a lot of useless data in it. And if you're running IIS on your server, the C:\inetpub\logs\logfiles\ subfolders can all be cleared out without issues.
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by:Rich Weissler
ID: 41871797
MOST of the ADM files can likely be deleted, and the answer directs the user to a script which identifies those that can be removed (and can backup, remove, and restore them).  I think everyone also agrees that the ADM files usually do not take up much space, so their removal won't recover a lot of space, so split the question with folks who identified alternate ways of cleaning up the domain controller.  The OP didn't return to indicate whether they were having specific problems with the size of their SYSVOL, but there were suggestions which might help there as well.  (If the SYSVOL is particularly huge, a previous administrator may have stuck program installation files in a group policy, for example.)
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