disabling jigglers in Windows 7

We have Imprivata Onesign that has screen locking enabled.  However, we have found people using USB jigglers to keep the session active and circumvent the screen locking.  We have a formal policy in place now but I was wondering if there is a way to disable the use of jigglers through group policy.  I understand that it will be fairly hard since jigglers are seen as a mouse to the operating system.  We can disable software versions of jigglers since users can't install software but the USB jobbies are a problem.
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Steve BantzIT ManagerAsked:
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JohnConnect With a Mentor Business Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Yes, all you can do is have a written policy. The device is just a mouse substitute and you cannot prevent a mouse from working.

So you need a signed policy that you can enforce.
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ste5anSenior DeveloperCommented:
What is a USB jiggler??

Just a thought, people wouldn't use these, when this wouldn't address some of their needs. So the question is: Why do they see Imprivata, that has screen locking enabled, as a problem?
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Steve BantzIT ManagerAuthor Commented:
A USB jiggler simulates mouse movement so to the OS it looks like someone is actively using the machine.  We have to maintain a 10 minute screen locking policy for HIPAA compliance.  You'd be surprised at how many people dislike that even though they are aware of the risks.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
The hardware versions of these work even if the computer is locked down. They are simple and need no rights.

Accordingly, you would have to:

(a) prevent access to the USB port (glue it shut)  OR
(b) lengthen the screen saver time.

There may be some prevention capability in the future but right now, no.
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ste5anSenior DeveloperCommented:
I see. The core problem is USB. Imho the only way is to use machines with no external ports or sealed ports.

I don't know the these HIPAA rules, but do they allow computers with USB ports?
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Steve BantzIT ManagerAuthor Commented:
Well, we do have to have USB ports enabled because we have RFID scanners attached to read employee badges to log into/lock the machine.  We also need them for barcode scanners and a variety of other things.  I can see that this is a slippery slope.  

We may just have to settle on a formal written policy.
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deroodeConnect With a Mentor Systems AdministratorCommented:
Not only do you need a signed and approved policy, but it has to be enforced not by you (you are a sysadmin, not a policeman), but by the HR department;
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Steve BantzIT ManagerAuthor Commented:
We drafted a policy that will be put in place by HR using the proper protocol.  You are right, this isn't IT's job to police.  I was hoping for a means to have Windows not allow it but this is too new right now.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Thank you for your update and I was happy to help.
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