Solved

Determining & validating if my SSL certificate is using SHA-2 cipher ?

Posted on 2016-10-23
15
115 Views
Last Modified: 2016-10-27
People,

Can anyone here please assist me in how to identify my existing SSL certificates which is using SHA-2 or not ?

I need to know if my existing SSL certificate is SHA-2 or not due to POODLE vulnerability (CVE-2014-3566 and CVE-2014-8730).

This is the article which is confused me:POODLE
Thanks,
0
Comment
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3
  • +1
15 Comments
 
LVL 25

Assisted Solution

by:Dr. Klahn
Dr. Klahn earned 125 total points
ID: 41856494
Per the above notes you've shown us, if the certicate was issued after January 1 of this year, it was issued using a SHA-2 cipher.

When was it issued?
0
 
LVL 7

Author Comment

by:Senior IT System Engineer
ID: 41856503
Certificate
I don't know, I'm new in the company hence I do not know when it was issued apart from the screenshot above.

Is that correct ?
0
 
LVL 77

Accepted Solution

by:
arnold earned 250 total points
ID: 41856514
Valid date is when it was issued.
Look at the cert detail, advanced, usually it has many details there.
The certificate is an identity mechanism, you can use regedit and disable ciphers within the schannel in hkey_local_machine setting to limit the protocols to tls 1.x and disable ciphers the client/server negotiate.
1
Is Your AD Toolbox Looking More Like a Toybox?

Managing Active Directory can get complicated.  Often, the native tools for managing AD are just not up to the task.  The largest Active Directory installations in the world have relied on one tool to manage their day-to-day administration tasks: Hyena. Start your trial today.

 
LVL 7

Author Comment

by:Senior IT System Engineer
ID: 41856526
Certificate - SHA
I can see it from the above screenshot, there is nothing mentioning SHA-2 at all ?

I have also disabled them all according to the steps in Registry on page 23-24. Would that be enough ?

Source PDF: http://www.preferrednet.net/media/1281143/iis_reverse_proxy_for_oxi_oeds-poodle_082815.pdf
0
 
LVL 83

Assisted Solution

by:Dave Baldwin
Dave Baldwin earned 125 total points
ID: 41856529
If your site is public, you can check it on this site:  https://www.ssllabs.com/index.html  I check all my sites there.
0
 
LVL 7

Author Comment

by:Senior IT System Engineer
ID: 41856530
Dave,

I don't think so, because when I put in the URL as per certificate SAN, it is displaying:

Assessment failed: Unable to connect to the server

from the Qualys website.
0
 
LVL 77

Expert Comment

by:arnold
ID: 41856531
The certificate is not the item suseptible to the attack, the connection between client/server us the issue.
Your certificate is SHA1 which does not conform to the notice you cited.

You seemed to have skipped the first paragraph of the notice and seems to misread/misinterpreted the meaning/implication of the seondary paragraph of the notice cited.
0
 
LVL 83

Expert Comment

by:Dave Baldwin
ID: 41856534
I think you're probably alright.  For some reason, SHA-2 seems to mean SHA256.
0
 
LVL 7

Author Comment

by:Senior IT System Engineer
ID: 41856537
@Arnold and @Dave: So in my case here, does my certificate seems vulnerable to POODLE or not ?

as I'm bit confused here.

The current SSL certificate is installed in the DMZ server which is running the web service for the other site offices to connect and pass on transaction to my head office Data Center.

When I type in the URL from the certificate subject, I cannot open the page from my Guest Wifi and from home.
0
 
LVL 7

Author Comment

by:Senior IT System Engineer
ID: 41856539
Arnold,

So is it the Thumbprint algorithm that I need to check ?
0
 
LVL 83

Expert Comment

by:Dave Baldwin
ID: 41856544
My certificates with 'A' ratings have SHA1 for the fingerprint but SHA256 for everything else.
0
 
LVL 7

Author Comment

by:Senior IT System Engineer
ID: 41856549
Dave, is there any way to test the SSL certificate from the Qualys or any other website for POODLE vulnerability ?

I guess I will have to export the SSL certificate and then test it somewhere else.
0
 
LVL 83

Expert Comment

by:Dave Baldwin
ID: 41856587
I don't think that will work since the certificate is specific to the domain name that it is for and shouldn't work anywhere else.
0
 
LVL 77

Assisted Solution

by:arnold
arnold earned 250 total points
ID: 41856967
The certificate us like a driver license, its authenticity verified by the signer, in this case it is goddaddy. The exchange of data that us suseptible to poodle deals with the interaction between a fluent and the web server via crypt modes.
Disable the ciphers raised as a concern.
If your site is not public, your exposure is there but is limited to authorized, done what more secured versus open to all.

Yes, you can install the certificate/private key on an externally facing system, or for purposes of this test, open a non-standard port that will forward the request to the server. Use the non-standard port in the ssllabs test then disable the forward after done with testing.
1
 
LVL 7

Author Closing Comment

by:Senior IT System Engineer
ID: 41863381
Thanks all !
0

Featured Post

PRTG Network Monitor: Intuitive Network Monitoring

Network Monitoring is essential to ensure that computer systems and network devices are running. Use PRTG to monitor LANs, servers, websites, applications and devices, bandwidth, virtual environments, remote systems, IoT, and many more. PRTG is easy to set up & use.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Examines three attack vectors, specifically, the different types of malware used in malicious attacks, web application attacks, and finally, network based attacks.  Concludes by examining the means of securing and protecting critical systems and inf…
As technology users and professionals, we’re always learning. Our universal interest in advancing our knowledge of the trade is unmatched by most industries. It’s a curiosity that makes sense, given the climate of change. Within that, there lies a…
This tutorial will walk an individual through the process of transferring the five major, necessary Active Directory Roles, commonly referred to as the FSMO roles from a Windows Server 2008 domain controller to a Windows Server 2012 domain controlle…
Email security requires an ever evolving service that stays up to date with counter-evolving threats. The Email Laundry perform Research and Development to ensure their email security service evolves faster than cyber criminals. We apply our Threat…

809 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question