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How to securely submit fillable PDF forms

Posted on 2016-10-24
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Last Modified: 2016-10-27
We need to add a way to submit our online fillable PDF forms however they need to be returned electronically other than as an email attachment.   Looking for a solution.
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Question by:Lance McGrew
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Expert Comment

by:Edwin Hoffer
ID: 41858012
Dear Lance
You can easily submit your PDF Online. You can find this feature in Adobe Acrobat itself. Follow these steps to securely submit your PDF.
1. Open Adobe Acrobat Pro
2. Go to Tool menu
3. You will find Forms there, drag your mouse over it
4. Forms will expand and will show an option Button Tool
5. Click on button tool
1.png6. The button tool dialogue box will appear, go to Action tab in it
7. In Select Option dropdown menu, You'll find Submit a form option. Select it
2.png8. Enter the URL of the link you want to Add in. Click on OK to continue
3.png9. A security Warning will show asking ou that you trust the site or not. Click on Allow to complete your task
4.png
Thanks & Regards
Edwin Hoffer
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Author Comment

by:Lance McGrew
ID: 41859493
Edwin, I had actually already seen a similar suggestion on Youtube however they used the mailto: rather than http:

So where does the PDF form submit to?  If mailto: is used, then I do not see any security on the transfer of data.
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Author Comment

by:Lance McGrew
ID: 41859529
Also recently found, once the Submit button is created, the PDF should be saved so people with Free Edition of Adobe Acrobat can use the form.

This involves doing Save As, Reader Extended PDF, Enable Extended Features
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Expert Comment

by:Edwin Hoffer
ID: 41859834
Dear Lance

The PDF file is submitted to the URL of the required website. The "mailto:" option you are talking about, is used to send the email. If you have to mail the PDF to someone in that case "mailto:" is used.

Thanks & Regards
Edwin Hoffer
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Author Comment

by:Lance McGrew
ID: 41861345
Edwin, the option to submit to the URL of the required website seems more secure than using the mailto: option which simply attaches the PDF and sends over unencrypted channels.

What needs to be on the website to receive the PDF?
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Accepted Solution

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Edwin Hoffer earned 500 total points
ID: 41861635
Dear Lance

I found an informative Adobe page on google. You can get assisted by this informal guide for your query "What needs to be on the website to receive the PDF?"

Thanks & Regards
Edwin Hoffer
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Author Closing Comment

by:Lance McGrew
ID: 41861838
Thank you Edwin Hoffer for your help.
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