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Allow X-Forwarded-For Headers to Site or No?

So, this one is new for me and I need a breakdown on it.  I already Google'd about it but I want a answer from someone knowledgable in this matter.

We host multiple sites for clients.  The sites are on IIS servers behind a load balancer.  One of the sites we host is having issues when their customers try to access it behind a proxy.  They can access it when they disable "X-Forwarded-For" option on the proxy but can't access it when they enable.  

My question to you is should we enable it for these users?  I ready that hackers can use that option if they breach your network and can use it to spoof the IP they came in on.  So obviously for us this is a security issue.

I'm not even 100% sure where to enable this, I believe I would do it on the actual web server and not the firewall, but I need advice on the ramifications of if I do it to begin with.
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cshepfam
Asked:
cshepfam
1 Solution
 
arnoldCommented:
On a proxy configuration X-forwarded-For deals with when proxies are chained.

Without understanding your situation it is hard to answer your question
Depending on your loadbalancer, you could add the X-Forwarded-FOR to the loadbalancer.

Direct access client would not care about this header entry, the proxy may benefit..

Are their proxy chained? local proxy that connects to another of their proxy at HQ which in turns contacts your loadbalaner, passing data to the IIS instance, etc.
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btanExec ConsultantCommented:
Indeed the X-Forwarded-For (and User-Agent) HTTP headers can easily be spoofed by any user.

By default, to secure your site, it should reject any connections that are not from the IP of the proxy server (configure the web server or firewall to only accept the client IP of the proxy for web connections). That is likely why you have connection without enabling XFF header.

Also you should consider installing an SSL certificate onto the proxy, which each client machine can trust. This will enable the proxy server to decrypt traffic, add the appropriate IP address header (overwriting any set by the client) and then forward it onto your server. The server code can then safely check the XFF header to make sure it remains constant per user session.

HTTP header should not be used for any Access Control List (ACL) checks because it can be spoofed by attackers. Use the real IP address for this type of restrictions.
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cshepfamAuthor Commented:
Thank you for the explanation.  It was the one I was looking for.
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