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Independent domain networks for setup

Posted on 2016-11-01
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Last Modified: 2016-12-09
Hi,
I am not a windows guy buy I need to setup a domain network. I done it before and it should be ok. However I have one thing I am not sure about and I do not really find an answer searching for it.

Basically I have a domain-server now that I need for my operation, it is running on MS Server 2003. I am now setting a new one up running MS Server 2016, however, I guess these 2 would conflict each other. However, the 2003 Server uses 192.168.0.x so if I configure the new one to 192.168.1.x they should not see each other. Is this correct? Is there anything I need to watch out for?
The plan is to setup the new one and than slowly migrate each workstation from one to the other.

Best wishes,
Thomas
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Question by:Thomanji
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Accepted Solution

by:
Lee W, MVP earned 2000 total points
ID: 41869540
Do not re-use names.  If your old server is called "SERVER1" then the new one should be "SERVER02" or "SERVER2"

If you're using DHCP you need to separate the broadcast domains or your 192.168.0.x network could end up getting assigned addresses from your 192.168.1.x DHCP server - or vice versa.

You should also be aware that even if you named everything the same, Windows Names are like people names - just because two people have the same names doesn't mean it's the same person.  Windows bases things on GUIDs (Globally Unique IDs) that are essentially randomly generated.  Computer and User account SIDs in AD are based on the domain SID as well - THAT is randomly generated at install time. So to connect machines you'll need to disjoin them from the old domain and rejoin to the new one.

To keep things clear (and simple) I recommend using a short domain name - for example, if your company is "Kuala Lumpur Consultants" - use the netbios domain name of KLC.  The DNS domain name should be based off your internet domain (or one of the internet domains you own; for example, ad.KualaLumpurConsultants.com or corp.KualaLumpurConsultants.com.
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Author Comment

by:Thomanji
ID: 41869553
Hi Lee,

Thank you for the detailed explanation. I appreciate your assistance to clear this up for me.
So the bottom-line is that if I use 192.168.1.x for my new server and call the local domain and server name something else they should not conflict each other. Correct?

Best wishes,
Thomas
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LVL 96

Assisted Solution

by:Lee W, MVP
Lee W, MVP earned 2000 total points
ID: 41869583
Keep the names unique and there should be no problem (other than DNS as mentioned before).
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Expert Comment

by:masnrock
ID: 41869922
Are both servers connecting to the same network, but just using different IPs, or are the two servers on different VLANs?
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Author Comment

by:Thomanji
ID: 41876686
Thank you very much for the feedback. All worked out well, just wanted to make sure.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Thomanji
ID: 41876688
Thank you for the assistance
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