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Oracle regular expression

Posted on 2016-11-02
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Last Modified: 2016-11-03
Hi,

Below is the sql query which i have written to extract only the digits  999999999 from the input string

Select regexp_substr('(999) 999-999','[^/(][[:digit:]]{3}[^/)] [[:digit:]]{3}[^/-][[:digit:]]{3}') from dual.

Expected answer is 999999999 but iam not getting the results. Any help is really appreciated.
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Question by:sam_2012
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slightwv (䄆 Netminder) earned 2000 total points
ID: 41870804
Why not this:
select regexp_replace('(999) 999-999','[^0-9]') from dual;
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by:sam_2012
ID: 41870876
i want to try with substr , it should be able to extract the 999's . any help on regexp_substr is really appreciated
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Expert Comment

by:slightwv (䄆 Netminder)
ID: 41870904
I don't think you can get what you want with substring.  Well, you probably can but it would be MUCH more involved that what you posted.

Substring does just that:  returns a substring from a larger string.  It will return the substring that matches the pattern you provided.

I don't believe there is a regex pattern that says "get these"..."ignore all these"..."get these".

If you look at your starting string you have 3 substrings that are all numbers.

I know of no way to "ignore" everything else with substring.
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LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:Geert Gruwez
ID: 41871203
actually ... you can do it with substr, but it's so silly ...
i have to admit, i used slightwv's code

select regexp_substr(regexp_replace('(999) 999-999','[^0-9]'), '.*')  from dual;

Open in new window

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Expert Comment

by:slightwv (䄆 Netminder)
ID: 41871289
The regexp_replace is the correct solution to your problem.

I "can" push in a thumb-tack with a sledge hammer but why would you?

I can beat Geert's and do it without the regexp_replace.

As long as you know you have a maximum of 3 groups of numbers:
Select
      regexp_substr('(999) 999-999','[0-9]+',1) ||
      regexp_substr('(999) 999-999','[0-9]+',2) ||
      regexp_substr('(999) 999-999','[0-9]+',3)
from dual
/

It breaks as soon as you add a 4th or more groups.
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Author Closing Comment

by:sam_2012
ID: 41872740
awesome
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