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Trying to setup Linksys wifi router as JUST wifi but not router

Posted on 2016-11-02
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Last Modified: 2016-11-22
Hi - have a Linksys AC1900 Wireless router (EA6900) - that I'm trying to connect and setup as just wifi without acting as a router - I thought it was going to be pretty simple, by just disabling DHCP on the Linksys, and giving it a LAN IP, but no such luck. So I have the linksys lan port connected to a LAN port on my sonicwall. The sonicwall is providing DHCP by obviously not wifi. If I go into the "connectivity" config of the linksys, there are 5 tabs (basic/internet settings/local network/advanced routing/administration) - basic is just naming the router, internet settings I'm assuming shouldn't be changed, there's nothing there, because those settings are on the sonicwall, local network, has the basic section where it wants me to assign an IP to the router. I attempt to change the IP to an IP/subnet that's part of the sonicwall network and as soon as I click "add" I get a message that pops up saying "invalid IP range" - not sure why this is happening - I appreciate any ideas - thank you
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Question by:hodgem
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by:CompProbSolv
ID: 41871368
It sounds as if you are trying to do this correctly.

The "invalid IP range" is odd as you're not setting up a range at all.

I'd check the IP address, subnet, and the default gateway to make sure that they're all compatible.  Post them here if you wish.

I'd also disable DHCP on the Linksys first.
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by:John Hurst
John Hurst earned 83 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41871374
Your two steps above are OK, but you also have to give the Linksys router a Static IP on your network. My guess is you have it on a different subnet.
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by:akahan
ID: 41871383
You'd want to connect a LAN port on the Sonicwall to the WAN port on the linksys, not a lan port on the Linksys, I think.
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41871395
I always connect LAN to LAN. Connecting to WAN on the Linksys causes a new subnet.
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masnrock earned 251 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41871400
The WAN port can be connected to the Sonicwall's LAN port if you're willing to deal with double NAT. A bunch of Linksys routers are NOT designed to act as APs. Other brands like ASUS are far more flexible in this regard.

But according to the manual, this one can be used as an access point if you configure it into bridge mode:
  1. Use a network cable to connect this router’s Internet port to the Ethernet or LAN port on the router that is connected to your modem.
  2. Log into Linksys Smart Wi-Fi. (See “How to connect to Linksys Smart Wi-Fi” on page 7.
  3. Under Router Settings, click Connectivity, then click the Internet Settings tab.
  4. Click IPv4.
  5. For Type of Internet Connection, select Bridge Mode.
  6. Click Obtain an IPv4 address automatically, then click OK. The new router’s LAN IP address will be changed and obtained from the router that is connected to your modem.

http://downloads.linksys.com/downloads/userguide/1224699372213/MAN_EA6900_8220_01617A00_Userguide_EN.pdf
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by:akahan
ID: 41871431
John, it should only cause a new subnet if you have DHCP turned on in the Linksys.  But the original poster here is NOT turning on DHCP in the Linksys, so the Linksys should just pass the DHCP requests through from the devices connected wirelessly to the DHCP server on the Sonicnet.  

The object of this game is to set the Linksys up as an ACCESS POINT: described on page 37 of the manual under "To set up your new router as an access point:"

masnrock has it right.
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41871433
I have turned all my Wi-Fi routers into Access Points and I connect LAN to LAN.
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by:vivigatt
ID: 41872066
1/ Go to this page :
http://www.linksys.com/gb/support-product?pid=01t80000003KdHUAA0

2/ Update your EA6900 firmware

3/ Get your device manual, read the section named "How to use a router as an access point", page 36

Alternatively, try to use another firmware (dd-wrt, openwrt...)
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by:hodgem
ID: 41872430
Thanks for all replies, but this doesnt appear to be working. I did what was described above:

1. Use a network cable to connect this router’s Internet port to the Ethernet or LAN port on the router that is connected to your modem.
2. Log into Linksys Smart Wi-Fi. (See “How to connect to Linksys Smart Wi-Fi” on page 7.
3. Under Router Settings, click Connectivity, then click the Internet Settings tab.
Click IPv4.
4. For Type of Internet Connection, select Bridge Mode.
5. Click Obtain an IPv4 address automatically, then click OK. The new router’s LAN IP address will be changed and obtained from the router that is connected to your modem.

I've tried this several times/ways. The first way was like above, and allowing DHCP to assign the wireless router an IP, put it into bridge mode, and it wont even let me connect to it. the SSID is VISIBLE, but it times out while trying to connect. I disabled DHCP.

The second way i tried was to manually add the IP/subnet mask/gateway/DNS, and it does the same thing, i disabled DHCP as well.

The 3rd way, I did one of the above but changed the SSID from Linksys01367 to another name/changed the password, and the same thing happens - just cant seem to connect! Anyone have any other ideas on this?
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41872437
Can you borrow another wireless router to test?  I connect wireless routers up frequently using the steps above (LAN to LAN, static IP on network and DHCP disabled on Wi-Fi). But as noted above, some routers won't do this. Try a different router.
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by:masnrock
ID: 41872443
Just out of curiosity, what happens if you connect a cable to the wireless router itself AFTER you've gotten it into bridge mode? Does the IP address seem to be a valid one, or does nothing still happen?
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by:hodgem
ID: 41872450
John - do you know of a NEW router that this will definitely work on? I will go get it and try.

masnrock - going to test that now.
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by:masnrock
ID: 41872457
@hodgem - You could buy most ASUS routers, and they literally allow you to switch them into AP mode. Not saying they're the only brand, but they would do the trick.
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41872458
Netgear, Belkin and entry level commercial Cisco will all work. I have use all these successfully.  A Cisco RV215 will work. That is what I have here at a client right now and it is working
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by:vivigatt
ID: 41872460
Have you upgraded your firmware ?
Have you connected your Linksys to your other switch/router using a LAN port (and not the WAN/Internet port) ?
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by:masnrock
ID: 41872473
I would try vivigatt's suggestion on the firmware update first if you haven't already done so.

Here are directions for the TP-Link Archer C7 .. I bought it to replace my old router of mine recently, and has worked great.

http://www.tp-link.com/en/faq-417.html

The reason I mention ASUS routers in particular is because you can usually find a switch on them to change what mode it's in without the web interface. Then you can go into the web interface and set up your wireless settings.

My old router was an ASUS, which I originally used as a repeater. Changed the unit to router mode using the switch on the back of it, and I literally didn't have to do anything to be working.
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by:vivigatt
ID: 41872535
You must also reboot your Linksys after the changes...

Unfortunately, EA6900 does not officially support alternate firmwares.
But there are tricks that would make it possible to use a very powerful firmware on your EA6900, as well as correcting the bug that there is in the bootloader of this device's stock firmware :
http://www.linksysinfo.org/index.php?threads/asuswrt-merlin-xvortex-on-linksys-ea6900-supports-tomato-dd-wrt.71718/
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by:CompProbSolv
ID: 41872653
I believe that the Bridge Mode is appropriate when you want to connect to the WAN port.  The initial approach you took (static LAN address on the main LAN subnet, DHCP off, LAN port to LAN port) really should work.

When you have it configured that way, are you able to manage the Linksys from the LAN side using an address that is on the same subnet as your main router?

When you try to connect wirelessly, what exactly is the issue?  Is it connecting but not getting an IP address (that's a DHCP issue) or is it not connecting at all (that's most likely an issue with authentication).

Did you reset the Linksys to defaults before starting this?  There may be some odd setting getting you in trouble.  For example, is there a setting restricting WiFi to guest (internet only) access?

What happens if you enable DHCP on the Linksys?  (Keep in mind that this can cause conflicts with your main DHCP server and should only be done when it is safe.)
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by:hodgem
ID: 41872726
Ok - to avoid a potential headache, and I don't have a huge amount of time, I went an purchased a Netgear WNDR3400 router - under the "genie" under LAN setup, I've added a static IP for the router, but I'm not 100% sure where to add the IP of the gateway, so it can get to the internet - under "internet setup" it appears to be looking for the IP address for the ISP, so any help is appreciated here -
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by:CompProbSolv
ID: 41872736
If you are connecting on the LAN side then you don't really care about the gateway address.  That is only used by DHCP (which you should have shut off) or when you are going through the router to the WAN port (which you are not).

I'd set a static IP on the WAN side that is a private address on a subnet you are not using (e.g. 192.168.25.2) and set a gateway of 192.168.25.1.
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by:masnrock
ID: 41872772
Honestly, I'd actually ask why you wanted a router versus an access point?
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by:CompProbSolv
ID: 41872779
@mansrock:
In my experience, routers are much more readily available and less expensive than access points.  Access points do often have more features, though.
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by:hodgem
ID: 41872783
From what I understand you have to have an established SSID to add access points, no?
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by:masnrock
ID: 41872789
Have you checked out Ubiquiti UniFi access points? The UniFi AP AC Lite might work out great for you, and the controller is software based.

You don't need an established SSID to use APs. With non controller based APs, they have their own interface where you can configure the SSID, etc. When you're using a controller, then it will automatically add the settings to additional APs for you've added them to the controller.
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by:hodgem
ID: 41872965
I actually bought 3 unifi UAP-AC-LITE access points that I was going to connect to work with the wifi router. So I hooked them up without the wifi router, connected them as per the instructions to the wall jack (I tested it to make sure it's live - and it is) installed the controller software on a computer on the network, and it's telling me " no devices found" - I even tried another unifi AP, and ho the same thing. Do I NEED to purchase a hardware controller for this, or should the controller software pickup all three? Any help would be appreciated
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by:masnrock
ID: 41872969
Check your Windows Firewall. Have you tried to turn it off?
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by:hodgem
hodgem earned 83 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41872976
Bingo!!
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41872977
Hardware controllers definitely work better. I am not sure why so much difficulty. Try a good hardware Wi-Fi router and it should work. I do not have any that don't work.
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by:vivigatt
ID: 41872995
Maybe you can stop buying devices and try to have one working ?
If they can't work, there may be something that does not work as expected or that is misconfigured.

If you have an access point that is just an access point, it's like a "virtual network cable". The network cable is replaced by the connection to the WiFi network, usually made with a password associated to the SSID. At first, make THAT working.

In order for us experts to have a netter idea of what is going on, please run these tests :
  1. Assign a STATIC IP address (and gateway, DNS etc) to the WiFi adapter of your test computer (use the same values that for a wired connection).  
  2. Connect the test computer to the WiFi network.
  3. Ping the access point.
  4. Ping the gateway.
  5. Then ping 8.8.8.8.
  6. Then ping www.google.com.
When all of these are working, you have a correct WiFi infrastructure.
If any of these is not working, make the requested corrections.
Then make sure that devices can get IP addresses with DHCP. THE DHCP server that is legit on your network should send IP configurations to the requesting nodes.
Then you are all set.
If anything is still not working, let us know at what step the test failed, it will help us have a better idea of what is going on (and wrong)
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by:masnrock
ID: 41873001
Don't ask me why they don't just have the firewall rules get created open during the install, but that is a common annoyance.

You should be good from here, but shout if you need more help
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41873003
I use a commercial AV and its firewall never gets in the way.
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by:hodgem
ID: 41873075
@masnrock - so if I have a PoE switch in the network room, and the network port that I have the unifi plugged into is connected to that PoE switch, do i need to have the PoE adapter that came with the adapter even connected/used? Seems like i'm defeating the purpose of having the PoE switch available. I mean, why wouldnt the unifi just have a regular old power adapter powering it? Let me know - thanks!
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by:vivigatt
ID: 41873099
Man, you're stacking problems instead of resolving the ones that stay unresolved.
I'm leaving this thread.
Good luck.
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by:hodgem
ID: 41873115
Not trying to add problems, I've never worked with these types of access points before, and this office has gone from 2000 square feet to 10,000 square feet, and I want to make sure the wifi coverage is there. I have seen in some environments where you see an access point on a wall not visibly attached to any type of power. I figured that maybe the PoE adapter was added to the box for networks without a PoE switch.
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by:CompProbSolv
CompProbSolv earned 83 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41873123
The PoE adapter is for scenarios where you don't already have PoE on the switch.  If your switch provides that on the port you are using (and you are using an 8-wire cable), then you don't need the adapter.
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by:hodgem
ID: 41873135
I'm sorry, what do you mean by "8 wire cable"?
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by:vivigatt
ID: 41873138
I understand your point, but you must, at first have ONE AP working.
Then, it you want to extend WiFi coverage WITH THE SAME SSID and network configuration, you will have to use some dedicated technology, certainly Master-Slave in repeater mode or WDS, or even B.A.T.M.A.N. protocol.
But this is another topic.
Your original topic is to be able to set one AP connected to your LAN. Make that work first, otherwise, everything you do will just add entropy to the problem.
You CAN do it with the Linksys EA6900 you had.
You CAN do it with most of the WiFi routers you can buy.
You CAN do it with stand-alone access points.
Now, you have to select ONE and ONLY ONE type of device. Make it work. Learn several things maybe.
Then, try your next step, which is to extend your WiFi coverage if I understood correctly.
My point is that you are wasting your time (and mine too...) changing the AP device three times a day.
Don't blame the devices, they ALL can be used as AP...
Now, which one will you use (and stick to it) ?
When you chose one, run the tests I wrote earlier and let us know WHERE it fails.
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by:masnrock
masnrock earned 251 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41873150
UAP AC Lite only works with passive POE. You have to either get a switch that can do passive POE or use the included injectors.

Your other choice is to get the UAP AC Pro, which will work your POE switch. You can use the same controller software, so no changes are needed from that aspect.
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by:CompProbSolv
ID: 41873350
"8-wire cable": Ethernet cables usually have 4 pairs (8 wires) but occasionally they'll have only 2 pairs as that is all that is needed with 10M or 100Mb/sec Ethernet.  One implementation of PoE puts the power on the unused wires.  If you have a 4-wire (2-pair) cable, this implementation won't work.

As a general rule, you should always use 4-pair ethernet cables.
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by:masnrock
ID: 41897224
Solutions provided. Marked answer that was most relevant to the original question as the solution, while also marking what helped the posted most as an assisted solution.
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