Scenario: Going from VMware to Microsoft HyperV

I've been contemplating moving all my VMware server VMs to Microsoft HyperV.  Here is my thoughts.  Let me know if this will work.

Environment:
2 - HP Gen8 server hosts running VMware 5.5
1 - HP SAN connected to network switch
6 - Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 VMs.  
    3 - running on server host #1
    3 - running on server host #2
    VMDKs located on SAN

Scenario:
1. vMotion all VMs to server host #1
2. Format and install Microsoft Server 2016 on server host #2
3. Install HyperV role
4. Attach Windows Server 2016 (server host #2) to SAN    
       (THIS IS THE PART I'M NOT SURE I CAN DO SINCE THE SAN IS USED ON THE VMWARE HOSTS)
       (CAN I ATTACH A MICROSOFT SERVER TO A SAN USED FOR VMWARE?)
5. Provided I can attach server host #2 to the SAN - run Microsoft's VMware to HyperV conversion tool on all 6 VMs to bring them into the HyperV environment.
6. Once all VMware VMs are converted and running on server host #2 - format and install Microsoft Server 2016 on server host #1
7. Install HyperV role
8. Attach Windows Server 2016 (server host #1) to SAN
9. Move 3 servers to server host #1 to balance load

Last - are there any Microsoft licensing issues I need to be aware of?  I have purchased Microsoft Datacenter 2016 Software Assurance.
Bob VaalIT ManagerAsked:
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)Connect With a Mentor VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Like with any virtual machines they will be located on whatever you nominate as the datastore on the Hyper-V Host.

If your server does NOT have any local storage, then you will need to provide storage for your Hyper-V host.

Once you have nothing left on your SAN, the you can provision it for Hyper-V. or as you move VMs off, create storage for Hyper-V.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)Connect With a Mentor VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
4. Attach Windows Server 2016 (server host #2) to SAN    
       (THIS IS THE PART I'M NOT SURE I CAN DO SINCE THE SAN IS USED ON THE VMWARE HOSTS)
       (CAN I ATTACH A MICROSOFT SERVER TO A SAN USED FOR VMWARE?)

NO. VMFS cannot be read by Windows. But this is not a requirement. You can use the same SAN, but not read the current LUN, or Volumes, because they are VMFS.

But you do not have to attach it, because Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter, will convert the VMs from ESXi Host to Hyper-V. It does not need access to the SAN.

see my EE Articles


HOW TO:  P2V, V2V for FREE to Hyper-V -  Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter 3.1

HOW TO: Convert a physical server or virtual server (P2V/V2V) to Microsoft Hyper-V using Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter 3.1

Last - are there any Microsoft licensing issues I need to be aware of?  I have purchased Microsoft Datacenter 2016 Software Assurance.

None, same licensing as you were running VMware.
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Bob VaalIT ManagerAuthor Commented:
Andrew,

Where will the converted VMware VM's reside once converted?  Naturally we will want the Microsoft HyperV disks to reside on the SAN but as you pointed out it is formatted as VMFS.  Will I need to convert them to an alternate location (say a NAS box as my server hosts don't have local storage)?  Once all VMware VMs are converted to this alternate location, do I reformat my SAN for Microsoft and then move the HyperV disks to it?
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Bob VaalIT ManagerAuthor Commented:
Andrew,

Thanks for the info.  As I mentioned this is a scenario.  If I do decide to change from VMware to HyperV it looks like I am on the right track.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Yes, just need to add some storage for hosts, for the conversion.
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Senior IT System EngineerIT ProfessionalCommented:
Bob,
Out of curiosity, what's the reason for migrating to Hyper-V from VMware ?
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