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Windows Server 2016 running IIS and SQL Server: configuration topology and optimization – recommendations


I am in the process of setting up a 2-servers home-based network to run IIS and SQL Server. It is my understanding that is best to use one server for SQL and the other one for IIS. I will appreciate your can share you recommendation in setting this up in order to secure and optimize performance in both servers. For example, should I setup the servers as Domain or just as Workgroup? What's the best practice to secure the two systems? I know each topic can get *very* deep and can have many variable, so please think on my environment. Both, SQL and IIS will not run anything fancy (heavy). I know Server 2016 is new and I am aware of the existence of the nano-server option, however, will prefer to use a traditional interface (GUI). Thank you much!!!
2 Solutions
Dan McFaddenSystems EngineerCommented:
If you are not running anything "heavy" then you should deploy IIS and SQL together on 1 server.

If this is just a one-off application, deploying AD just makes your build more complex.

In general, for medium to large load sites, I would recommend separating the web app from the db.  For smaller loads, there is no reason to not run the app and db on the same server.  For light work, running SQL Server Express would probably be enough.

I would recommend to run a single server that contains IIS and SQL Server in a workgroup setup.

If you post more about what your application setup requires, better recommendation could be made.

Ryan McCauleyData and Analytics ManagerCommented:
I'd agree that AD may be overkill - if you're trying to learn how active directory works and want to work with that configuration, you can use it, but neither SQL Server nor IIS requires it. You can log in to the SQL Server using local SQL authentication (rather than windows users) and you won't have any issues.

It may be worth setting this up on two different servers just so you can see what it's like to configure the networking and make sure they're communicating, but it isn't required - both applications will fit just fine on one server, especially if you're not doing much with them. Ideally, SQL Server would have it's own physical disks (one for logs and one for data), but that's also not a requirement if they're light use.
Cobra967Author Commented:
Thank you all for your comments!
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