Can 16Mbps internet speed work on this line ?

how.pnghere's my line settings , how much speed will i attain from the 16Mbps ?
marcel sithAsked:
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Dr. KlahnConnect With a Mentor Principal Software EngineerCommented:
With DSL, the only way to tell if a line will go at speed X is to run it at speed X and see what the throughput is.  What a router says is currently "attainable" is not "what you can expect 24 hours a day under all conditions.

DSL is not like cable with repeaters every half-mile to ensure signal quality, where the cable company can say "Here's some more of our bandwidth in exchange for some more of your money."  The DSL signal pump is at the phone company central office and the farther away you are, the worse the signal is.  Further, since DSL runs over legacy copper which in some cases was installed in the early 1900s, there's only so much that can be done with clever modulation when the upper bands are leaking into waterlogged underground cable sheaths.

An ISP can assign 16 Mbps speed to a modem at the end of a local loop, but it won't get 16 Mbps.  They've tried it on our line and despite assurance that it would work beautifully ... still 384 Kbps.

All you can do is try it and see.  If it doesn't come up to spec, cancel the contract for non-performance.
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Dr. KlahnPrincipal Software EngineerCommented:
Assuming you've already got DSL on the line, go to http://www.speedtest.net/ and run the speed test on the line at its current speed.

Divide the actual throughput speed by the ISP's quoted current speed.  This is the fraction of the ISP's quoted current speed that you're actually getting out of the line.

Multiply 16 Mbps by the fraction computed above.  This is the best possible throughput that can ever be had from that line at 16 Mbps.

Now derate that speed by another 20 to 25 percent.  This is because the faster DSL goes, the better copper is required, the less reliable it is, and so anything above 3 Mbps is a crap-shoot.  This last number is about what can be expected.
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marcel sithAuthor Commented:
that's not what exactly i'm asking for, i want to know if my line will be able to handle the speed in first place
i know i won't be getting the whole speed, but can my line handle more speed than i currently have (2Mbps) ? and if so how much ?
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marcel sithAuthor Commented:
for example, in this guy's router it gives him what the maximum speed his line can handle (attainable rate), my router doesn't give me this infoattain.jpg
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