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What's the difference between these two "qualifiers?"

Posted on 2016-11-11
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What's the difference between these two qualifiers:

datediff(d, max(t.created), getDate()) <= 45

and...

max(txn.created) > DATEADD(DAY, -45, GETDATE())

I'm thinking with the first one you have all of the rows where the t.created value falls within a range defined by the difference of today's date and whatever t.created values equals to 45 days or less.

The second clause is all of the rows that have a date that's greater than today's date minus 45 days.

Even when I attempt to explain that, I'm thinking they are fundamentally the same, but am I missing something?
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Question by:brucegust
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Scott Pletcher earned 1000 total points
ID: 41884260
datediff(d, max(t.created), getDate()) <= 45

= The number of calendar days (not necessarily 24-hour days) between t.created and the current date must be <= 45.


max(txn.created) > DATEADD(DAY, -45, GETDATE())

= The date and time in txn.created must be greater than the date and time 45 days before today.


The time factor is probably the most significant difference between them.
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by:Pawan Kumar
Pawan Kumar earned 500 total points
ID: 41884421
Both are same if you consider the logic.

This <<datediff(d, max(t.created), getDate()) <= 45>> is really bad for performance as it will execute this expression for each row in the table and will lead to scanning the entire table even if you have index on the column.

This <<max(txn.created) > DATEADD(DAY, -45, GETDATE()) >> is good, since we are doing maths with the constant value and SQL will calculate the constant separately since it is not dependent on the any table.

Hope it helps !!
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by:arnold
arnold earned 500 total points
ID: 41884665
the material difference is the logical comparison, one deals with integer comparison, the other performs datetime comparison.
The datetime comparison, can be simplified by assigning the date 45 days ago into a variable to avoid running dateadd for every row
Declare @date as datetime
Set @date=dateadd(d,-45,getdate())

Max(txt.created)>@date

Question is the cost of running datediff on every row of a result set less or more than datetime comparison, if not mistaken, the comparison on datetime also scans the entire result set datetime fields are not indexed........
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