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vibration sensors: piezoelectric to wireless

Posted on 2016-11-13
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Last Modified: 2016-11-16
I am very new to this discussion, so please "speak slowly" ;)

I need to measure the vibrations of hundreds of widgets in parallel and need:

- low cost
- low physical profile
- easy application of the device
- no worries about batteries failing

It seems piezoelectric vibration sensors may be for me. But these devices simply generate electricity, true?

Would I use a piezoelectric vibration sensors in unison with an active RFID chip which transmits the vibration via wireless for that widget?

Or, does the piezoelectric vibration sensors already contain some form of wireless transmission?

Thanks.
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Question by:newbieweb
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John Hurst earned 500 total points
ID: 41885609
The very few times I have used piezoelectric devices did not involve wireless. This article suggests it is possible at 1.9 GHz.

http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0964-1726/13/5/018/meta

I could not see how you would implement it the way you wish and I did not see any free methodologies.
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Author Comment

by:newbieweb
ID: 41885611
Nothing's free. I want low cost, not free.

The abstract of that article [you sent me] seems to say my idea DOES work.

I need those vibrations to be communicated to a remote receiver (less than 100 feet away) and be uniquely identifiable.

What part am I missing?
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Assisted Solution

by:John Hurst
John Hurst earned 500 total points
ID: 41885616
You would have to set up a wireless receiver (Raspberry PI perhaps) to detect the vibrations at the frequency they are putting out. I have not done this, so cannot give a step by step.
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Author Comment

by:newbieweb
ID: 41885619
So, that would mean a remote device plugged into the PC that picked up the 1.9 GHz. And that receiver would receive all signals from roughly 100 widgets, each with is own device attached?

OR, must there be some form of receiver on each device?

So long as you are less confused than I am, you certainly can help ;)
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Assisted Solution

by:John Hurst
John Hurst earned 500 total points
ID: 41885621
Each device would have to transmit. That is also what the article was suggesting and the transmitting device would be a custom device to sense the piezoelectric vibration and turn it to a wireless signal.

I don't think this an off-the-shelf or easy project.
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Author Comment

by:newbieweb
ID: 41885641
I see...it says.

Furthermore, a 1 cm3 generator has been used to power a custom designed 1.9 GHz radio transmitter from the same vibration source.


So, I have to think I am not the first to need the vibration from a widget, and want to use a piezoelectric vibration sensor to power the transmission of that vibration. Can't I then use an active RFID which transmits vibration? Once it gets juice, it seems it would be ready to transmit. Please comment.
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Assisted Solution

by:John Hurst
John Hurst earned 500 total points
ID: 41885645
The first comment (generator has been used to power a custom designed 1.9 GHz radio) was what led me to post the article in the first place here.

Can't I then use an active RFID which transmits vibration? Once it gets juice, it seems it would be ready to transmit  This seems reasonable but it is a bit over my head.

I hope it can work out for you.
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Author Closing Comment

by:newbieweb
ID: 41890051
thanks
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LVL 95

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 41890238
I was happy to help you to the extent of my experience with this.  Thanks.
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