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  • Status: Solved
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Allow Local User to Log On FTP

Running IIS on a Windows Server 2012 R2 box. A developer is writing an app that is trying to log on to one of the FTP sites using a local account on the server. Since the site is configured for domain authentication, to log on using this local account you have to specify <servername>\<accountname> as the user.

Is another way to do this without having to hard code the server name, but still keep domain authentication? We'd like to be able to move this app without it being dependent on a specific server name.
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Brian B
Asked:
Brian B
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3 Solutions
 
QlemoC++ DeveloperCommented:
Often a dot instead of the server name works for local authentication. Sometimes I can use a "x" instead. I can't tell if that works for FTP, though.
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Davis McCarnOwnerCommented:
Have you tried using the built-in variable USERDOMAIN?
You would use it in the form of %USERDOMAIN%\<username> as part of the login and you can check what you should get by running SET in a CMD window.
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QlemoC++ DeveloperCommented:
You can't use that remotely, FTP itself does not perform environment variable substitution. If you do in a cmd window, your local entry is used, which is useless for remote.
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Brian BIndependant Technology ProfessionalAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the answers. I did find that using .\<username> works when testing on the server directly, but I have found that sometimes fails in other situations when "." translates to the name of the machine running the client instead of the server.

I was just wondering if there was some setting within IIS itself that would make this work better, but it doesn't sound promising.
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QlemoC++ DeveloperCommented:
There might be a setting to prefer local authentication over domain authentication in FTP / IIS, but if it is an all-or-nothing one, i.e. domain authentication would require the domain name to be supplied.
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Davis McCarnOwnerCommented:
If they are logging into the same domain, my first post applies:
"Have you tried using the built-in variable USERDOMAIN?
 You would use it in the form of %USERDOMAIN%\<username> as part of the login and you can check what you should get by running SET in a CMD window. "
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QlemoC++ DeveloperCommented:
Davis, they do not want to use a domain account for this user, but for everybody else.
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Brian BIndependant Technology ProfessionalAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the info. Davis, as Qlemo pointed out, using an environment variable won't work in this situation, so I had to correct my original acceptance. Sorry about that.
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