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Sheet music - indicating power chords in staff

Posted on 2016-11-21
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Last Modified: 2016-12-02
Hi music people

How do I indicate power chords in a regular score? I see some score with chord letters in capitals, but I can play a power chord A on the 5th fret and regular open chord A

Do I just do the 1,5,8 in the bass cleft with the tab square above it, or is there a conventional way? is putting the chord letter in capitals in that beat's spot indicative, understood?

Thanks
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Question by:beavoid
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by:Kent W
Kent W earned 250 total points
ID: 41896528
In tablature, normally just the notes themselves indicate a power cord.
In true scoring, the most often standardization is the cord name "E5", or whatever, written above the measure / note (which ever makes sense for that particular chord).
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by:beavoid
ID: 41901147
Thanks,

so A5 is A major played on the 5th fret, bar chord, not open,
and so D5 would be its 4th, D Major?

F#2 would be F# bar chord on 2nd fret,
B2 would be its 4th, B major played there also?

Thanks
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BillDL earned 250 total points
ID: 41901839
The "E5" that Kent W was referring to is an indication that the chord comprises only the Root and the 5th note from the scale of E major.  A Power Chord does not use the 3rd note from the scale because that is the one that distinguishes the chord from being a Minor or major one.

The 5 in "E5" is not a reference to the fret number.  It is just a method of indicating an E Power Chord.

Reference:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_chord
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by:Kent W
Kent W earned 250 total points
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I'm sorry I did not see your response OP or I would have clarified.  Bill gave you good info there. Thanks  Bill.
Yes the 5 indeed refers to the chord being a 5th.
A power chord is traditionally only two tones, the root and the 5th, and also played amplified with high or muddy gain.  On a standardly tuned guitar the shape, using G as an example (G5 power cord) would be 6th string 3rd fret, 5th string 5th fret.
You simply move this shape around, and it works for any chord with it's root on the 4th, 5th, or 6th strings, except for open power chords. In these instances the nut of the guitar is doing that work of holding the root, so in the case of, say an E, the shape is open E (6th string) and fretted B (2nd fret on the 5th).  But important to remember the power chord is only these two tones, traditionally. Adding any other tone but root /5th makes it something else.
Also something to note that I don't see a way to example here - when you see power chords on score, above the staff notes, they are normally indicated, for example E power chord is E5.  But what we can't show here is that 5 is normally raised up a bit in typeface similar to scientific notation or exponent notation (like 10 to the 10th power).
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by:BillDL
BillDL earned 250 total points
ID: 41901892
Kent W, I'm not sure if you will be able to see this article, but it explains the formatting options and associated tags that can be used in comments here.
http://support.experts-exchange.com/customer/portal/articles/2421387
The ones that follow the description of the normal toolbar buttons are new formatting options like subscript, superscript, strikethrough, and highlighter.  Superscript uses [sup]Text[/sup]

H5
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Author Comment

by:beavoid
ID: 41902117
Thanks everyone.
Like you say, and as I thought. That wikipedia link says it.

An A power chord on the 5th fret is A5, and its 4th, D, there, too, is D5

Happy holidays!!
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by:BillDL
BillDL earned 250 total points
ID: 41902131
Happy power chording.  Incidentally, DON'T play "Smoke On The Water" using Root and 5th power chords (D5 / F5 / G5, etc).  It is in G minor uses power chords based on the Root and 4th ;-)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoke_on_the_Water
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by:beavoid
ID: 41906632
Thanks.

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by:beavoid
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Thanks
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by:BillDL
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Thank you beavoid
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