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windows disk management

Posted on 2016-11-23
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Last Modified: 2016-11-29
i would like to shrink a non system partition and use it to extent the C drive or system partition. but shrink and extension cannot be done towards the left.

is there a way?

Partition magic a third party tool does it. How does it do it?
every tool is an interface which uses one or more windows functions on the background.
How the tool actually by pass the rule?
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Question by:Viswanath V P
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by:gilnov
gilnov earned 83 total points
ID: 41899466
There's no magic to making a left-to-right partition move. The limitation is with Windows built-in tools not the NTFS file system or disk hardware. It has mostly to do with not letting you mess with the STARTING block of the partitions on a live disk. As far as I know, third party tools can only do left-to-right operations when they boot from media other than the drive being operated on. BTW, PartEd is another excellent freeware alternative if you don't want to spend money. You can download an ISO and make a bootable disc from a number of places such as this one: https://www.gnu.org/software/parted/
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by:Lee W, MVP
Lee W, MVP earned 83 total points
ID: 41899468
It doesn't bypass the rule.  It MOVES the contents of existing "start" of the partition to the end of the partition and then it adjusts the partition tables so the space is at the beginning.  A better solution is to move all the data on the other partition to a new PHYSICAL drive and then delete the existing partition, extending C:

Of course, you might not have to do any of that if you clean up C: / adjust your server's configuration.  (Many people think they can't/have done everything they can - that might be true - and it might be that you don't know other things can be done too!  How big is the C: drive).
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garycase earned 251 total points
ID: 41899505
Conceptually, here's the issue:

Suppose you have two partitions, marked as C: and D:   The drive would conceptually look like this:

CCCCCCCCCCCCDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD

You want to extend C:, but there's no free space; so you shrink partition D: to free up some space.    The drive now "looks" like this:

CCCCCCCCCCCCDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDfffffffffffffff

... where the f's represent free space.

You can't extend C:, because a partition has to be contiguous.   So what you need to do is "slide" the D: partition to the right, so the free space is between the two partitions.    In other words, what you want is this:

CCCCCCCCCCCCfffffffffffffffDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD

There are a variety of tools that will do this.   What I use is Boot-It BM, which is a VERY reliable and excellent partition manager.   To use it, you would simply boot to a bootable CD or USB Flash drive; select CANCEL at the first prompt (you don't want to install it on the disk); then click on Partition Work; highlight the partition you need to move; and then click on "Slide".   Select 0 free space "After" the partition ... and just wait for it to do the slide.    This assumes you have already done the "shrink" on the partition to free up some space.    You could also just use Boot-It to "ReSize" the partition before doing the slide -- but I gather you'd like to use Windows Disk Management as much as possible -- so you can do everything except the "slide" from Windows.

http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/bootit-bare-metal.htm

Note you can use the free demo to do what you need here.   Just download Boot-It BM, extract the files in the download; and run the "MakeDisk" utility to create a bootable CD or flash drive.


If you don't want to use a 3rd party utility, an alternative to this would be to simply copy all of the data from D: to another disk;  delete the D: partition;  expand C: as much as you want;  then re-create D: and copy all of the data back to it.
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by:noxcho
noxcho earned 83 total points
ID: 41900196
Microsoft has set this limitation because moving the left border of the partition can destroy the ability to boot from this partition. It is easier to generally disable the ability to change this start of partition than taking care of correctly reallocating data from ex-start to new position. And this is valid for system and non system partitions. In short all data is usually stored in partition from start to end. That is the reason.

The third party partitioning tools makers thought a little bit further and cared about this second part of partition start changes.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Viswanath V P
ID: 41905683
Thank you guys for your replies!!  it was very knowledgeable
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