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Why is F11 different than setting Full Screen in Group Policy

Posted on 2016-11-30
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Last Modified: 2016-12-04
I have a system that boots up and runs Internet Explorer with 2 tabs.  If I then press F11 the window goes into "Full Screen" mode, but I can run the mouse to the top of the screen to show the Address Bars, so I can switch tabs.

However, if I set the "Enforce full-screen mode" group policy and then start the system, when IE goes into Full Screen mode I cannot get to the tabs.

Is there a way (through Group Policy) to set the same full screen as the F11 version so that I can access the two tabs, but so they go away if I don't run the mouse over them?

Thanks,
Eric
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Question by:Eric Pearson
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All set.  I found that if you change the registry instead it works.

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Main

Set to Yes
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