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Help needed to setup network with mix of Ethernet and WiFi

Posted on 2016-11-30
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Last Modified: 2016-12-01
Hi Experts,

My NAS and my PC (Windows 10) are in my office, but my Internet connection is via Wifi from a room that is on a different floor.

I don't want to use Wifi for the connection betweem my PC and NAS - as it's too slow.

What do I have to do to get my PC to talk to my NAS via Ethernet cables?

Here is a sketch of my setup:
sketch of my setup
Here are outputs from IPCONFIG /all:

Ethernet adapter Ethernet 2:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : 
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Surface Ethernet Adapter
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 58-82-A8-91-BA-0D
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::1186:ab71:c75:2c64%25(Preferred) 
   Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address. . : 169.254.44.100(Preferred) 
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 
   DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 257458856
   DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-1E-04-C5-83-B4-AE-2B-DA-E2-6D
   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
                                       fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1
                                       fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled


Wireless LAN adapter Wi-Fi:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : fritz.box
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Marvell AVASTAR Wireless-AC Network Controller
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : B4-AE-2B-DA-E2-6D
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::3503:c228:7770:dfaa%15(Preferred) 
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.71(Preferred) 
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Thursday, 1 December 2016 9:45:59 AM
   Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Sunday, 11 December 2016 9:46:02 AM
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.254
   DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.254
   DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 112504363
   DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-1E-04-C5-83-B4-AE-2B-DA-E2-6D
   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.254
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

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Regards,
Leigh
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Question by:LeighWardle
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by:John Hurst
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by:LeighWardle
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Hi John,

Thanks for your suggestion.

I have tried using modern Power line adapters for Ethernet - TP-Link TL-WPA4220KIT AV500 EOP.
Bit it's painfully slow, taking minutes to render single webpages....
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by:John Hurst
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Good ones (more expensive) are faster.

The other way (I do this) is to find a closet route between floors and run a CAT5e Ethernet cable. That will work.
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by:LeighWardle
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Hi John,

I only want to have the Ethernet connection between the NAS and the PC.
They are 3 feet away from each other.

What do I need to do to get the NAS and the PC on the same Ethernet network?, at the same time using WiFi for the PC's Internet connection?
Do I need a another router to manage the Ethernet network, instead of the switch?.
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by:John Hurst
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It depends on how the router is hooked in.  If it is on the same floor as the router, you can use a W-Fi router or add a Wi-Fi router to the main router as an extension. I do the latter using a Cisco RV325 VPN main router and a Cisco RV220W Wi-Fi router.  Works fine.
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by:John Hurst
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In your diagram, you need to hook Ethernet back to the router (not the PC) but the router and NAS are on different floors. So install Ethernet between floors or consider moving the NAS to the router location.  Also consider dropping the requirement for Wi-Fi. Ethernet will always be faster (soon AC wireless is coming which will help enormously )
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by:Bing CISM / CISSP
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what you need is just a *cross-over* Ethernet cable to connect the NAS and your PC's LAN port. that's the only extra hardware you need.

the other thing is just to manually set the static IP addresses for the NAS and your LAN adapter on PC. like what you have illustrated, just two IPs on a different subnet such as 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.1.2.

but make sure don't give default gateway setting for LAN adapter, just leave it blank, as well as the DNS settings.

i assume your wireless network is using 192.168.0.x subnet, which must be different with your NAS subnet, and your wireless adapter is using an automatic IP obtained from the DHCP service running on your wireless router.

does it make sense?
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by:LeighWardle
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Thanks, John & Bing.

I've ordered a cross over cable - this may take a week.

Bing - your explanation makes sense!
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by:Bing CISM / CISSP
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FYI
-3.PNG
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by:garycase
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A crossover cable isn't going to help ... First, virtually all modern Ethernet adapters are auto-sensing, so you could simply use any cable to connect two ports;  Second, you're doing essentially the same thing with a switch already.

The problem you have in the topology you show in the question is that your PC is connected to two different subnets -- one wireless; one wired.

What I'd do for your situation is get an old router (or a new inexpensive one) with DD-WRT, and use it as a wireless bridge.   It will connect to your wireless signal; and then bridge that to all devices connected to it -- and communications between connected devices will be at wired speed.   You can get an old Linksys WRT-54G or D-Link DIR-601 on e-bay for ~ $10 and then flash it with DD-WRT as outlined in this article:
https://www.cnet.com/how-to/reuse-an-old-router-to-bridge-devices-to-your-wireless-network/

In fact, looking on e-bay, here's one already flashed for $21.95:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Linksys-WRT54G-v8-Wireless-Wifi-WLAN-Router-DD-WRT-Firmware-/272469603971?hash=item3f70743683:g:vxsAAOSwo4pYF8Gb

You can also buy more modern routers and flash them as well, but this would cost significantly more.

Note:  One disadvantage of the older, very inexpensive routers is that their wired ports are only 100Mb.   But you can add an inexpensive Gb switch to the topology and easily get Gb speeds between your connected devices => just plug one switch port into the router; then all your other devices into the switch.
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by:LeighWardle
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Hi Gary,

Thanks for your suggestions.

I'm "down under" in Australia and I'm impatient, so the cheap DD-WRT options you mentioned would have taken a bit too long for shipping.

Instead, I have ordered a new ASUS RT-N66W Wireless Dual-band N900 Gigabit Router.  
Not sure if I can put DD-WRT on it - the DD-WRT database has Asus RT-N66U on it?

If I can't put  DD-WRT on it, I assume there would be another way I can set up the wireless bridge?
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by:garycase
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According to what I found, the only difference between the ASUS RT-N66W and the Asus RT-N66U is the color :-)

Apparently the "U" is black,  the "W" is white.

I doubt the DD-WRT firmware can tell the difference :-)

... so yes, you should be good with that router.     An excellent choice, actually, as it has Gb ports.
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by:Bing CISM / CISSP
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@garycase

> A crossover cable isn't going to help ...

do you mean a switch or home router is a must for connecting only TWO devices? i really don't see ANY point to add an extra device, consume more power and use extra cables to do the SAME thing.

> First, virtually all modern Ethernet adapters are auto-sensing,

we are talking about a PC and a NAS device, NOT today's modems or routers which virtually all are auto-sensing.

 > so you could simply use any cable to connect two ports;

a cross-over is the most easy to way to do so: no auto-sensing is required, no switch or any other device required, no extra power required, and at the highest speed available for the two hosts!

if a device, such as a home router used as a switch, is put in the middle and its default setting is DHCP enabled, you have to manually configure the device to disable its DHCP at least its default gateway setting, otherwise the LAN adapter on PC will not able to access the internet wirelessly because LAN connection's default gateway will have a high priority than wireless connection. You have to either configure the router or modify the PC's routing table to get rid of the troubles!

again, i really don't see ANY point to add an extra device here, just for interconnecting TWO hosts!

> Second, you're doing essentially the same thing with a switch already.

YES, the topology looks the same except NO device in the middle.

NO, different IP addresses are recommended. that's the key reason why the author's own solution didn't work and why he asked the question here!

if you carefully read the question and review the IPCONFIG /ALL result provided, you may notice that the LAN adapter is assigned with an automatic private IP and that's the reason the PC is not able to connect with the NAS. the wireless adapter is assigned with an internal IP 192.168.0.71 with default gateway pointing to the local wireless router at 192.168.0.254, but author intends to give the NAS an internal IP 192.168.0.1 and hope the 0.71 address could talk to the NAT at 0.1 and the router 0.254 at the same time, which is wrong and technically impossible.

therefore i clearly recommended that two IP subnets are required for the scenario, and illustrated the workable IPs for the case.

does it make sense now?
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by:Bing CISM / CISSP
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> Instead, I have ordered a new ASUS RT-N66W Wireless Dual-band N900 Gigabit Router.  

as i mentioned above:

if a device, such as a home router used as a switch, is put in the middle and its default setting is DHCP enabled, you have to manually configure the device to disable its DHCP at least its default gateway setting, otherwise the LAN adapter on PC will not able to access the internet wirelessly because LAN connection's default gateway will have a high priority than wireless connection. You have to either configure the router or modify the PC's routing table to get rid of the troubles!

ii really don't see ANY point to add an extra device on your table between the NAS and your PC, this not only looks messy but also consume more power and use extra cables to do the exact SAME thing.
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by:Wirelessnerd
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It has been said before but you do NOT need any new hardware.

Just configure the NAS and your PC's wired connection with ip settings without default gateway and connect them with any UTP cable.
For example:
NAS: 172.16.0.1
PC wired: 172.16.0.2 (no default gateway!)

PC  Wireless: DHCP as usual

So cancel that order for the Assus. You do not need it!
Just make sure wired and wireless are different subnets.
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Bing CISM / CISSP earned 350 total points
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agree with Wirelessnerd.

the opinion is basically the same as mine. for a NAS and a PC, you just need a cable, not any device.
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by:LeighWardle
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Thanks, Bing and Wirelessnerd.

I got everything working just with a crossover cable!

I will award points tomorrow.
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by:LeighWardle
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Interestingly, everything is on a single subnet.

I've attached my updated schematic, based on Bing's version:

 my updated schematic, based on Bing's version
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by:Bing CISM / CISSP
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> Interestingly, everything is on a single subnet.

are you sure you can access the NAS while accessing the internet from the same PC? i reckon you will lose connection to the NAS if you stop using it for a long while, when the MAC address of NAS is discarded from the ARP cache.

however, it is not recommended as it will cause issues soon or later.
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by:LeighWardle
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Hi Bing,

I know the question is closed, but I'll ask a new question if needed.

I want to set up the 2nd subnet, starting with the NAS on 192.168.1.26.

But the NAS says that it needs to be on the same subnet as the Gateway and the DNS Server:

Synology NAS Network settings
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by:Bing CISM / CISSP
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you may safely input any other valid IP for the subnet, whatever it is existing such as your PC's IP on the subnet or non-existing such as 192.168.1.111.

as your PC is not a router or gateway, the NAS has no way to access other networks or the internet, therefore those IPs for default gateway or DNS are not applicable for your scenario having a peer-to-peer connection.
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