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IPv6 and IPv4 Subnetting scheme

Hello Experts,

I have an office site that will have close to 650 users in Total.

My first question is can I enable IPv6 for the LAN, and IPv4 as well , for the IPv4 I am thinking to 10 network. What do I need to enable IPv6 on the LAN and is that good thing?

I would like an IP Scheme or vlans that will serve that following.

1. Basement floor.
2.Ground floor
3. 1st floor.
4. 2nd floor
5. 3rd floor

There will also be different networks for the following

1. Security and door access.
2. Wi-Fi For LAN and Guest.
3. Management network for the network devices.
4. Data
5. Voice
6. Video --> that should be for the multi-media devices
8. Wi-Fi --> To server 1500 users (internal and external)
7. Native Vlan
8. Interlink vlan between the firewall and core switch.

I also need to do in the end a route summarization for this office.

Any comments and replies are highly appreciated.

Regards,
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Habib Z
Asked:
Habib Z
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1 Solution
 
Terry WhitneyCommented:
Hello,

If you are not familiar with an IPv6 network, you can easily have overlapping services and other issues such as incompatible hardware, slower than normal data transfers and internet access across the board.

I am not trying to discourage you, I am just telling you that IPv6 is has a learning curve and not all devices, networks or internet providers fully support IPv6.

Further IPv6 often is often improperly configured allowing gaping holes in your network security.

You can use IPv6 and IPv4 on the same network at the same time.   I would suggest you use caution, and possibly roll out IPv6 in a small test environment before trying to roll it out with a new facility with such a large size all at once.


From a security stand point, your WIFI and LAN for guest use, I would highly suggest placing it on a DMZ, completely separate from your internal network,
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Habib ZNetwork AnalystAuthor Commented:
I agree with you on that.

Any other comments
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masnrockCommented:
There will also be different networks for the following

1. Security and door access.
2. Wi-Fi For LAN and Guest.
3. Management network for the network devices.
4. Data
5. Voice
6. Video --> that should be for the multi-media devices
8. Wi-Fi --> To server 1500 users (internal and external)
7. Native Vlan
8. Interlink vlan between the firewall and core switch.

As far as VLANs go, I'd have split like this (excuse any misinterpretations of the section I put in the quote)

1. Security
2. LAN - Data and WiFi (you can certainly split these if you'd like)
3. Management
4. Guest WiFi
5. Voice
6. Video
7. Native VLAN

Not going to say #8 is not needed, but it feels unneeded from my own view.

However, what does not add up is that you're saying your wireless would serve 1500 people, but you mention only 650 users total. Did you leave out contractors and consultants from that number or do you have spaces where a lot of presentations are done? If that is the case, then I can start to understand why the VLANs by floor
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masnrockCommented:
How did this turn out?
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