Identify two keyboard codes and how to enter them

Hello,

What type of codes are the following and how do you enter them using a standard PC keyboard?

asc 225
U+03B4

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I thought the technique was to hold down the ALT key while entering the characters in the number pad. However, for the first one, I've tried each of the following entries and only get clubs (♣♣♣).

ALT+225
ALT+0225
ALT+{NumpadAdd}225

I found them in an AutoHotkey script in which case they code for ß & Δ respectively.

b::Send {ASC 225}
+c::Send {U+03B4}

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Thanks
WeThotUWasAToadAsked:
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Joe WinogradDeveloperCommented:
My guess is that the problem is that you don't have NumLock on. For example, with NumLock on, Alt-225 and Alt-916 create these, respectively (in many programs, including Word, but not all):

ß
Δ

Here's a nice chart with the codes for the Greek letters:
http://www.keynotesupport.com/websites/greek-letters-symbols.shtml

Regards, Joe
aranaCommented:
if you get clubs it just means that the window you are trying to type that in doesnt support extended ascii or unicode,
try using notepad
alt+225 will result in ß
and for the greek delta  δ   you must use either charmap or create a registry key under
HKEY_CURRENT_USER of type REG_SZ called EnableHexNumpad , set it to 1, and reboot.
Then you can enter Unicode symbols by holding down Alt key and typing the plus sign on the numeric keypad followed by the character value.
Alt (hold it)   then +03b4

When you release the Alt key, the symbol will appear.
WeThotUWasAToadAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the response Joe.

No, I checked that and NumLock is definitely on. However, your comment implied that holding down the ALT-key while entering the three digits is indeed the correct procedure. As a result, I tried a few other things and interestingly, here is what I discovered:

I was attempting to enter the code in Notepad, not an Office app. Normally, that should not make any difference but also, because of my disability, I always have activated a setting in Windows Ease of Access Center called Sticky Keys. Sticky Keys enables you to simply tap a modifier key (rather than holding it down) and still have its effect applied to the next keystroke.

For example, typical use of modifier keys (say for capitalizing the letter A) is the following:

        {Shift down} > "a" > {Shift up}

but with Sticky Keys active, this will suffice:

        {Shift} > "a"

With a little testing, I discovered that:
        • with Sticky Keys off, Alt+225 returns ß in Notepad and Excel as expected.
        • with Sticky Keys on, Alt+225 does not return ß in Notepad but instead returns Alt+5, a club (♣).
        • with Sticky Keys on, Alt+225 does return ß in Excel, as it should.

Sort of odd, don't you think?
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WeThotUWasAToadAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the response arana. You must have posted while I was  typing my reply to Joe.

I have always wondered about the U... codes.
Andrew WrightIT CoordinatorCommented:
Notepad is not a very good program to use if you are wanting extended ascii char set.

Use Notepad++
Joe WinogradDeveloperCommented:
> I checked that and NumLock is definitely on.

OK, good to know.

> holding down the ALT-key while entering the three digits is indeed the correct procedure

Yes!

> I was attempting to enter the code in Notepad, not an Office app. Normally, that should not make any difference...

But it does. Note this comment at the Greek Code Chart (the one I posted a link to earlier):
The ALT codes can be entered directly into many programs, such as Word and Photoshop. But not all codes work in all programs.

> Sticky Keys

Ah, I'm not familiar with Sticky Keys. But based on your description, it sounds as if it should be holding down the Alt key so that the 3-digit procedure works.

> with Sticky Keys off, Alt+225 returns ß in Notepad and Excel as expected.
> with Sticky Keys on, Alt+225 does not return ß in Notepad but instead returns Alt+5, a club (?).

The above two comments would indicate that Sticky Keys is not working as expected.

> with Sticky Keys on, Alt+225 does return ß in Excel, as it should.
> Sort of odd, don't you think?

Yes, odd! I can't explain that. All I can say is that Alt-225 (with NumLock on) creates ß here in Excel and Notepad (Word, too). Regards, Joe
marsiliesCommented:
I found the solution. The trick is to make sure the option "lock modifier keys when pressed twice in a row" is on in the Sticky Keys options.

Then, to type an alt code press Alt, Alt, 225, Alt.

The first two "Alt" presses are to lock it into being "pressed down", then all three number keys while the Alt key is "down," then the last Alt press "releases" the Alt key.

Otherwise, if you only press Alt once at the beginning, it only stays "pressed" for the first number key.

Sticky Key options

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WeThotUWasAToadAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the help.
Joe WinogradDeveloperCommented:
You're welcome, Steve — always a pleasure! Regards, Joe
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