Netflix streaming problem

We are using a Netgear N300 wireless router to stream Netflix to a Samsung smart TV.  I have noticed when there are other devices using the wireless connection, the Netflix stream constantly stops and reloads.  I wonder if I somehow worked another wireless router into the mix, if that would solve the problem, or, is there a best approach to take to solve this? My idea of a second wireless router would require I hook it up to a port on the Netgear router, right?  The thinking is the second wireless router would be for the TV while other users can continue to use the Netgear wireless.
wfcrrAsked:
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Edward PamiasTeam Lead RRS DeskCommented:
First off what is the speed of your internet? Second the router is an N Router. Did you try getting a router from your cable provider, they will usually provide the latest and greatest free of charge, such as an AC router. Third, how many devices are you using on this router?
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masnrockCommented:
As Edward pointed out, you should get an AC router instead if you HAVE to use wireless. Streaming uses a lot of bandwidth. However, I would recommend that you switch to a wired connection if your TV allows, which would be far more stable and get you around interference issues. If the TV is nowhere near the router, you could either get a Homeplug or MOCA kit.
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Craig BeckCommented:
To put it into perspective, the average HD stream requires 8-9Mbps.  You're barely touching the sides if you're connected using 802.11n at 144Mbps.  The thought that needing a 433Mbps link is required is just a myth.  Saying that though, if you have a lot of wireless clients, giving them all a fast link will help.

What's more important is that your wifi signal is interference-free.  If even just one of your clients has a poor link due to interference, it can degrade the service for everyone else connected to the same AP/router.  In that sense, adding a second AP can and does help, providing you can use a different channel that's not affected by interference.

I'd use powerline adapters for this if the TV has an Ethernet port.  It'll take pressure off the wifi and give the TV a more reliable service if your mains cabling is decent.
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wfcrrAuthor Commented:
TV is in an area where we'd have to get cable run to it. The modem is in the office while the TV is on the other side of the building, so would need to run Ethernet to that side. Wireless has just been simpler.

Speed of ISP connection is 50 download/5 upload.

We use that router because the VOIP company sent it for use with our phones.  

I'll look into the powerline adapters and see if that works. Otherwise, I think I'll just figure a way to run Ethernet to that area.

Actually, though, if I try an AC router, would I daisy chain it somehow with the N router? I think I have to keep using the N router for our VOIP phones.
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Natty GregIn Theory (IT)Commented:
Hi let me help you, I have same tv and N router and when my children comes home with their devices walla reload, how I solve that problem is to solve the bandwidth issue so I bought Trend TEW 818 dual band router with a 1900mbps bandwidth and a hefty 1.4 gas processor n 128ddr3 then coupled that with a trend 8 gigabit port switch with 2000mbps full duplex no loop 8k mac-address, no more Netflix buffering or lag.

The problem was that the processors in the N routers are not equipped for so much multitasking. And most N routers or 400mhz processing at best.
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Craig BeckCommented:
The problem was that the processors in the N routers are not equipped for so much multitasking. And most N routers or 400mhz processing at best.

Multitasking has nothing to do with it.  You only need a big CPU in the router if you're running lots of different services on it.  For standard NAT, firewalling and wifi you'll never ever need a 1.4GHz CPU in your router, ever.
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masnrockCommented:
TV is in an area where we'd have to get cable run to it. The modem is in the office while the TV is on the other side of the building, so would need to run Ethernet to that side. Wireless has just been simpler.
Check out homeplug kits. If you by chance have FiOS, look at MoCA adapters. Both scenarios avoid the cable running. Homeplug is the less expensive solution of the two. They are also both basically set and forget (all of the work is up front).

Wireless is simpler and would feel more familiar, but also has the complexities of interference and signal. It may help of you moves the router closer, but putting in a second router leaves you with the same challenges you already have.
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Craig BeckCommented:
I already mentioned powerline adapters :-)
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Natty GregIn Theory (IT)Commented:
Like I mention above my Trend Tew-818dru 1900AC with nearly 25 wireless device and no lagg, not only that my upgraded 8 port gigabit Trend TED-S82g switch everyone love the upgrade 4bars 5ghz on my second storey house in all rooms considering I have the router in one corner in the basement adjacent to the master bed room on second floor.
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Craig BeckCommented:
Unfortunately wireless isn't always that simple. Just because it gives you great coverage doesn't mean it will in other scenarios.  There's lots of variables which need to be considered.
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wfcrrAuthor Commented:
@Craig Beck and masnrock, I think I want to try the powerline adaptors. How much more "Hackable" is my router via adaptors connected to the electrical grid?  As for service, we are using cable internet. Which adaptors are best to use?  I am assuming the adaptors have one for connecting to router port and one for connecting to TV port.
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masnrockCommented:
@Craig - We both had. That comment was my second mention. :-)

@wfcrr - The adapters communicate using encryption, which will mitigate a number of concerns. However risk tends to exist more in shared buildings like apartments. Here is an article to help you with securing your powerline network: https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-secure-your-homeplug-powerline-network-2487487

I have used Netgear products without incident.
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wfcrrAuthor Commented:
Should I close this question now, or wait til I implement the solution?
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masnrockCommented:
Whatever you feel makes the most sense. If you think this is sufficiently resolved you can close now. But there is nothing wrong with waiting until you've done it either.

Either way you can always open another question later if necessary.
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wfcrrAuthor Commented:
I am thinking this one has the added capability of wifi.  Am I reading it right?  I mean, I assume it will use Ethernet from router to the first Netgear adapter, then the second adapter will get the data from the electrical outlet and make it available in the other room via Ethernet or via wifi....am I barking up the right tree?

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/netgear-powerline-wi-fi-1000-access-point-and-adapter-white/4760605.p?skuId=4760605&productCategoryId=
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masnrockCommented:
That is correct.
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Natty GregIn Theory (IT)Commented:
They have more advanced power line than the one you're looking at. How ever if you and your neighbor, or you live in an apartment and you both share the same grid, which is often the case you will be broadcasting your network to your Neighbours also.

In other words providing them with internet, and possible leaking your data.
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Natty GregIn Theory (IT)Commented:
You can use the AV 500 series Powerline some has dual and four Ethernet ports that you can use in another room.
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