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how routers work

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i chose networking as my area of specialization and im just a beginner so i want to know the important of router in networking
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Patrick BogersDatacenter platform engineer Lindows
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Michael LinkInfrastructure Engineer
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some oneNetwork Architect
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Another feature that is often provided by a router is Network Address Translation (NAT).  In addition to other features, NAT allows multiple computers (with private IP addresses such as 192.168.x.x, 10.x.x.x, 172.x.x.x) to share a single connection (typically to the internet) through a single public IP address.  Without that, we'd have lost the ability to keep adding computers to the internet because of running out of IPv4 addresses.
Paul SauvéRetired
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Fred MarshallPrincipal
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Natty GregIn Theory (IT)
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In the above mention, I'm only going to add that you take your time or you'll be overwhelmed so start with the list Mention by Michael then slowly dive into the rest. know what they are ----- first then what they do then your understanding will be opened.
some oneNetwork Architect
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NAT isn't really a routing function but more of a trick. Some routers can't do NAT at all, and only some layer3 switches can do it.
Fred MarshallPrincipal
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Craig Beck:  I guess you mean in an RFC sense or what?  NAT is certainly an important ingredient in router products.  Maybe this isn't the place (it's not a chat) but it would be nice to understand better what you mean.  Maybe in the context that Bello Adamu can benefit from?
some oneNetwork Architect
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Access control lists are an important feature too but they're just a trick as well. I'd argue that NAT is only important at the network edge (or between networks). It certainly isn't a requirement inside a network in 99% of cases, hence people using layer3 switches rather than routers.

A router's primary purpose is to pass traffic based on its destination, not to manipulate the traffic. Anything other than routing the raw traffic is an added extra.
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Patrick BogersDatacenter platform engineer Lindows
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Hi Sarah, this is good Reading and worth creating an article for, did you think of this?
Natty GregIn Theory (IT)
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Hi Sarah it seems like you're still in school, with your suggestion everything come flooding back to mind. As mentioned by Patrick Article it please.

So it will be useful as a reminder and to those seeking this information.

Great write up
Sarah S.Network Trainee

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Patrick and Natty,

I am really glad you found it interesting and worth reading. Thank you :)

To answer your questions regarding school, Natty, then no, I am not in "school" any longer. My current employer thought, it would be a splendid idea to bring in a network guru, as part of a 2-day teambuilding bootcamp thing, to kind of educate 4 "IT dumb" girls in networking. Yeap, I were/am? one of them. He however didn't count on the teaching skills of the instructor, so what started as a simple "what happens when you plug this cable into this box tthingy?", started an avalance of questions and a lightbulb being turned on IT wise.

Afterwards I insisted, he'd sign me up for a Cisco course, and well, what started up as somewhat fun/jokey (is that a word?) event, ended up with him close to loosing his PA to the IT World ;)

Speaking of an article, if you guys think it would be a good idea, I am all for it. Funny thing is, I haven't been on EE for almost 7-8 years, since a summer internship back in my younger school days. I am still trying to wrap my head around Cisco, EE and figuring out this whole new world. Funny how things go.

In retrospect, I probably need a raise now ;)
Natty GregIn Theory (IT)
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True
Patrick BogersDatacenter platform engineer Lindows
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Good explanations given.