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Pat Brown
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Flash drive storage for old computer.

I have an old 386 SX MS DOS computer that solely runs one program.  The computer has one 5.25 IDE floppy drive  that does not work and one 3.5 IDE floppy that is on it's last legs.  I would like to back up all my files that I have programed over the years on to a USB flash drive. Can I do this some how through the serial port on the back of the computer or is there an IDE to UBS adapter that I can plug in where I take out the 5.25 or 3.5 floppy drives?  Any help will be appreciated.
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John

8/22/2022 - Mon
Ramin

one Idea is to detach the Hard Disk and connect it to another computer and copy what you want. if it has an IDE connector you can buy an IDE to SATA connector ( very cheap ) and connect it to SATA port on another PC. most recent computers use SATA port.

also u can buy an IDE to USB connector to transfer your data to USB. but check if there is more than one IDE connector on Mainboard.
other drives ( floppy) don't use IDE connector.

other option is obtain an IDE CD/DVD drive and connect it to IDE connector and Burn your data into it. but check if you have Two IDE connector on Mainboard.

other option is PCI to USB adapter.
dbrunton

IDE 5.25 and 3.5 drives?  I suspect not.

IDC is the proper connector for floppy drives.  If this is a 386 SX board then quite possibly it has a IDE socket on the mother board in which  you can plug in an IDE to SATA connector that Ramin describes.

You don't state if this computer has a hard disk drive.  Can you tell us if this does?

Or is your purpose just to copy a whole lot of floppy disks across to another computer?  If this is the case then a USB 3.5" floppy disk drive might just be what you want.

Something like this https://www.amazon.com/NEWSTYLE-3-5-External-Floppy-Drive/dp/B00KX8EMOO  (I'm not endorsing or recommending this drive, just giving an example of one).
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dbrunton

I better clarify my previous post.

The USB floppy drive I suggested was for backing up 3.5" floppy disks onto a modern computer.

And, yes, you can use some USB devices on DOS.  There is a limited range of drivers available for this purpose but not all drivers/devices work.  I have been down this path.  But there should be no need to go that way for this purpose.
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nobus

imo - the floppy drive cable does not fit these adapters
serialband

You would get the usb floppy, as drbrunton suggested, for transferring floppy disks.  I didn't need to redo a link for that.  My suggestion was for an IDE hard drive.  386 laptops did have hard drives back then.  They were small, maybe around 100 MB, but they did exist.
nobus

that's what the asker still needs to tell us - there were many with only floppies too
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Pat Brown

ASKER
Yes, sorry I did not mention, the 386 does have a hard drive.  My data is on the HD and I would just like to put everything on a flash drive for simplicity instead of old unreliable 3.5 floppies.
John

Put the hard drive in a compatible carrier on a more advanced computer and copy the data to a USB drive. I have done this lots of times
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serialband

I expect that you won't be keeping the drive around too long, since you've said that "it's on its last legs", so I suggest getting the cheaper, and more versatile, adapter that I've listed.  You can use for other IDE and SATA drives instead of an enclosed, IDE only, carrier that costs more.  Plug that into a USB port on a newer computer and plug in a USB drive.  Then, copy the files.  It should be enough.  You might also look into Roadkil's unstoppable copier, if the old drive is starting to fail and produce errors.
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nobus

Pat Brown - please return and give us some info so we can help
John

Use  carrier to retrieve data from the drive.