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Can DNS Host records be artificial after Domain merge?

Posted on 2017-10-12
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Last Modified: 2017-10-16
We are merging two domains into one.  We have a library, .lib domain that will be going away, and server objects merging into parent domain.  We want all the servers to maintain the .lib part of their name for application, web and certificate purposes.

We have the internal integrated AD DNS, and also an external DNS.  I assume on Internal - when objects are moved between domains, the .lib server will be removed and  the name will end in the only the primary domain.  I assume I can make .lib type Alias records for these pointing to new name.  For instance,  abc.lib.contoso.edu will become abc.contoso.edu when switching domains - and I can Alias abc.lib.contoso.edu to abc.contonso.edu.  Does that sound reasonable?

Then, on External DNS -- which is all manually can I just keep the abc.lib.contoso.edu with the same IP.  The 'real' server will be abc.contoso.edu -- but the IP will be the same.  Is there a need to setup a proper HOST record for abc.contoso.edu, then an Alias abc.lib.contoso.edu.  Can I just leave things exactly as they are and not worry about DNS replication, etc.. Essentially, can I just leave abc.lib.conoso.edu HOST record  - which is accurate now - the same after migration.  It's IP will NAT to proper server - IPs are staying all the same.  Will it matter that external HOST record is actually accurate as far as 'true' new server name?  Then there's nothing to replicate.
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Question by:apsutechteam
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7 Comments
 
LVL 39

Expert Comment

by:Aaron Tomosky
A host record will function exactly the same as a dns record for forward lookups. However I believe for reverse lookups and network browsing services you need the dns reverse lookups (to pull the name from the IP).
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Author Comment

by:apsutechteam
I'm not sure what you mean -- HOST record functions exactly as DNS record.  Do you mean ALIAS record?  A HOST record is a DNS record, along with many others types.  Not sure how to interpret?

Are you saying other than Reverse  -  there isn't difference in using ALISA and HOST?/
Thanks
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LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:Hypercat (Deb)
>>I can Alias abc.lib.contoso.edu to abc.contonso.edu.  Does that sound reasonable?

Yes, that will work perfectly.

>>Will it matter that external HOST record is actually accurate as far as 'true' new server name?

No, it doesn't matter; you can keep the same external host name if that's the URL that external users will use to connect.  If you have any secured sites, this means that your SSL certificates will also match, which is good.  And if you use the same URLs internally, then the alias will point the user to the correct site.
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LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:Hypercat (Deb)
P.S. As to Aaron's comment, I'm not sure what he's thinking either.  PTR records are only required for hosts; there's no such thing as a PTR record for an alias.  The alias points to the host record and if the host record has a PTR record, then that PTR is used if necessary.
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LVL 15

Expert Comment

by:David Favor
Trying to guess at what you're getting at is difficult.

Best to provide an exact list of your current internal + external DNS records + likely someone can instantly answer your question.

To be clear, there is no such thing as a host record.

Three are A records, which relate a random string (host or domain) to an IP address.

There are CNAME records, which alias a new random string (host or domain) to an existing random string (host or domain).

If I understand what you're asking, you'd do this like this (snippet only, not complete zone file)...

abc              IN  A      1.1.1.1
abc.lib         IN CNAME abc.contoso.edu.

Open in new window


Difficult to suggest correct syntax, without seeing your entire zone file.

Tip: Run the following against your final zone file to ensure you've correctly setup all your records...

named-checkzone contoso.edu your-contoso.edu-zone-file-path

Open in new window

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LVL 39

Expert Comment

by:Aaron Tomosky
I thought author was referring to a record in a HOSTS file. Correct, there is technically no such thing as a host record.
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LVL 15

Expert Comment

by:David Favor
Actually, posting your entire zone file will likely get you an instant answer.

Guessing about a person's zone file layout will likely prove less than useful. There are just to many variations of zone file layouts.
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