CONST CHAR* buf TO BYTE*!

magdiel linhares
magdiel linhares used Ask the Experts™
on
I am trying to do a cryptography, but to no avail .... the code does not compile. How do I convert const char * buf to BYTE? Or is there another way?


#include <cstdio>
 
typedef unsigned char BYTE;
 
BYTE server_keys[2][256] = {
	{
		0xFC, 0x77, 0xA1, 0x85, 0x1F, 0x30, 0x51, 0x20, 0x93, 0x4A, 0xE3, 0x10, 0x0E, 0x32, 0x58,
		0x64, 0x36, 0x8C, 0x19, 0xF0, 0x61, 0xE0, 0xDF, 0x9E, 0x9F, 0x90, 0xD0, 0x05, 0xFA, 0xEB,
		0x3D, 0x4B, 0xA5, 0xF1, 0x72, 0x73, 0xD4, 0xB5, 0x70, 0xD7, 0xCD, 0x9A, 0x95, 0x2B, 0xC9,
		0x00, 0x8E, 0xAC, 0x35, 0x1B, 0xE7, 0x7B, 0xC3, 0x15, 0x11, 0xF6, 0xAD, 0x5B, 0x87, 0x86,
		0xB4, 0x9B, 0x26, 0xDB, 0xDE, 0x1C, 0x66, 0x24, 0xD8, 0x27, 0x6A, 0xBD, 0x5D, 0x8D, 0x7D,
		0x0D, 0xAE, 0x8B, 0xA9, 0x62, 0x6B, 0x0B, 0xE2, 0x5C, 0x6C, 0xBE, 0x54, 0x55, 0x6E, 0xBF,
		0x3F, 0x88, 0x99, 0xB0, 0x48, 0x16, 0x5A, 0x34, 0xA6, 0xE8, 0xFD, 0xD3, 0xE4, 0x82, 0xD6,
		0x8A, 0x3B, 0xFE, 0xA4, 0x94, 0xF8, 0x06, 0x97, 0xCB, 0xF5, 0x33, 0x79, 0xD9, 0x83, 0x4F,
		0xB1, 0xAB, 0xA2, 0x69, 0x91, 0xFF, 0xC6, 0x2C, 0x68, 0xC1, 0xAA, 0xC4, 0x1D, 0x18, 0x3A,
		0xBC, 0x04, 0x2F, 0xA3, 0xFB, 0x17, 0x89, 0x25, 0x02, 0xCF, 0xDD, 0x2D, 0x6D, 0xC5, 0xC2,
		0x46, 0x01, 0xE5, 0xED, 0x2E, 0xDA, 0x31, 0x37, 0x40, 0xC8, 0xB6, 0xE9, 0x7C, 0x45, 0xF3,
		0x47, 0x22, 0xF9, 0x63, 0xB9, 0x13, 0x38, 0x78, 0x2A, 0xC0, 0xEC, 0xEF, 0x28, 0x12, 0x6F,
		0x75, 0xEA, 0x29, 0x84, 0x9C, 0x44, 0x96, 0x0A, 0x59, 0x76, 0x92, 0x41, 0xF2, 0x67, 0x08,
		0xB8, 0x43, 0xCA, 0x1E, 0xE1, 0x52, 0x3C, 0x42, 0xEE, 0xA8, 0x5F, 0x23, 0x1A, 0xD5, 0x7F,
		0xC7, 0x5E, 0x50, 0x81, 0xF7, 0x7A, 0x65, 0x09, 0xCC, 0x60, 0x0F, 0x9D, 0x53, 0x80, 0xA0,
		0x98, 0xB3, 0xA7, 0x49, 0x57, 0x7E, 0x3E, 0x03, 0xDC, 0x39, 0xBB, 0x8F, 0xCE, 0x4E, 0xF4,
		0xE6, 0xB2, 0x74, 0x21, 0x0C, 0x71, 0x07, 0xB7, 0xAF, 0x56, 0x14, 0x4D, 0xD2, 0x4C, 0xD1,
		0xBA
	},
	{
		0xEC, 0x48, 0x4E, 0x18, 0x93, 0x4C, 0x98, 0x7F, 0xDA, 0x43, 0x89, 0x6A, 0x1E, 0xAA, 0xF9,
		0x65, 0x07, 0x22, 0xD8, 0x52, 0x01, 0xCA, 0x61, 0x7A, 0x85, 0x91, 0x54, 0x08, 0xE6, 0x8D,
		0x41, 0xDD, 0xD1, 0xC8, 0x72, 0x31, 0x94, 0xFB, 0xC7, 0x4F, 0xE7, 0x9C, 0x3E, 0x46, 0xD5,
		0xE4, 0x76, 0xAE, 0xAB, 0x77, 0xBF, 0x11, 0x09, 0x51, 0xD7, 0x55, 0x39, 0x45, 0xA4, 0xFE,
		0xBA, 0x9A, 0x6E, 0xB8, 0x2C, 0x57, 0x32, 0x2A, 0x5F, 0x50, 0xD4, 0x5B, 0xB3, 0x3A, 0xA6,
		0x9B, 0x3C, 0x14, 0xDC, 0x1D, 0xFC, 0x27, 0x6C, 0x86, 0x17, 0x5A, 0x5C, 0xDB, 0x78, 0x75,
		0x70, 0xF7, 0x3D, 0x8E, 0xE1, 0x05, 0x0D, 0xF3, 0x20, 0x6F, 0x8C, 0x36, 0x7C, 0x69, 0x06,
		0xA3, 0x7D, 0xCF, 0xE3, 0x3B, 0x67, 0x40, 0xF8, 0xFA, 0xA2, 0x0C, 0xB6, 0xAD, 0xC6, 0xA0,
		0xBE, 0xA1, 0x37, 0xB0, 0xB2, 0x12, 0x9E, 0x23, 0xD9, 0xD0, 0xCD, 0x4B, 0x84, 0x1C, 0xD6,
		0xED, 0xE8, 0xC1, 0x3F, 0x2F, 0xB5, 0x38, 0x8A, 0x71, 0xF2, 0x28, 0xC3, 0xD2, 0x6D, 0xB9,
		0x30, 0xA9, 0x73, 0xA5, 0x02, 0x5D, 0xC9, 0x10, 0x62, 0xFD, 0x47, 0xAF, 0x81, 0x2B, 0x9D,
		0xC0, 0x90, 0x99, 0x74, 0x49, 0x44, 0xB4, 0x8F, 0x92, 0x0E, 0xB1, 0xE0, 0x0B, 0x0A, 0x7E,
		0x95, 0x96, 0x34, 0x68, 0x53, 0xCB, 0xEF, 0xCC, 0x2D, 0x56, 0xEE, 0xF0, 0x24, 0x1B, 0xF5,
		0x66, 0xD3, 0x03, 0x00, 0x15, 0x4A, 0xE2, 0xA7, 0x58, 0x1A, 0xE5, 0x29, 0x63, 0x25, 0xB7,
		0xCE, 0xBB, 0xF4, 0x7B, 0x4D, 0xBD, 0x35, 0x79, 0x0F, 0x80, 0x26, 0xE9, 0xAC, 0xEB, 0x97,
		0x16, 0x82, 0xA8, 0xBC, 0x13, 0x21, 0x19, 0x1F, 0x2E, 0xC2, 0x87, 0x88, 0x9F, 0x83, 0xEA,
		0x59, 0x42, 0xC5, 0x04, 0x5E, 0x60, 0xF6, 0x33, 0xC4, 0xF1, 0x6B, 0x64, 0xDE, 0x8B, 0xDF,
		0xFF
	}
};
 
BYTE client_keys[2][256] = {
	{
		0xC6, 0x14, 0x9A, 0xC5, 0xF3, 0x5F, 0x68, 0x10, 0x1B, 0x34, 0xB2, 0xB1, 0x73, 0x60, 0xAE,
		0xDA, 0x9D, 0x33, 0x7D, 0xE5, 0x4D, 0xC7, 0xE1, 0x54, 0x03, 0xE7, 0xCC, 0xC1, 0x85, 0x4F,
		0x0C, 0xE8, 0x62, 0xE6, 0x11, 0x7F, 0xC0, 0xD0, 0xDC, 0x51, 0x91, 0xCE, 0x43, 0xA3, 0x40,
		0xBC, 0xE9, 0x8B, 0x96, 0x23, 0x42, 0xF7, 0xB6, 0xD8, 0x65, 0x7A, 0x8D, 0x38, 0x49, 0x6D,
		0x4C, 0x5C, 0x2A, 0x8A, 0x6F, 0x1E, 0xF1, 0x09, 0xAA, 0x39, 0x2B, 0xA0, 0x01, 0xA9, 0xC8,
		0x83, 0x05, 0xD6, 0x02, 0x27, 0x45, 0x35, 0x13, 0xB8, 0x1A, 0x37, 0xBD, 0x41, 0xCB, 0xF0,
		0x55, 0x47, 0x56, 0x9B, 0xF4, 0x44, 0xF5, 0x16, 0x9E, 0xCF, 0xFB, 0x0F, 0xC3, 0x6E, 0xB7,
		0x67, 0x0B, 0xFA, 0x52, 0x94, 0x3E, 0x63, 0x5A, 0x8F, 0x22, 0x98, 0xA8, 0x59, 0x2E, 0x31,
		0x58, 0xD9, 0x17, 0xD5, 0x66, 0x6A, 0xB3, 0x07, 0xDB, 0xA2, 0xE2, 0xEE, 0x84, 0x18, 0x53,
		0xEB, 0xEC, 0x0A, 0x8E, 0xFD, 0x64, 0x1D, 0x5D, 0xAC, 0xA6, 0x19, 0xAD, 0x04, 0x24, 0xB4,
		0xB5, 0xE0, 0x06, 0xA7, 0x3D, 0x4B, 0x29, 0xA4, 0x7E, 0xED, 0x77, 0x79, 0x72, 0x69, 0x3A,
		0x99, 0x4A, 0xCA, 0xE3, 0x97, 0x0D, 0x30, 0xDE, 0x75, 0x2F, 0xA1, 0x7B, 0xAF, 0x7C, 0x48,
		0xAB, 0x8C, 0x74, 0xD1, 0x3F, 0x95, 0x3C, 0xD3, 0xE4, 0xD7, 0x78, 0x32, 0xA5, 0x89, 0xEA,
		0x92, 0xF8, 0xF2, 0x76, 0x26, 0x21, 0x9C, 0x15, 0xB9, 0xBB, 0x82, 0xD2, 0x6B, 0x81, 0x20,
		0x93, 0xC4, 0x46, 0x2C, 0x86, 0x36, 0x12, 0x80, 0x08, 0x57, 0x4E, 0x1F, 0xFC, 0xFE, 0xB0,
		0x5E, 0xC9, 0x6C, 0x2D, 0xCD, 0x1C, 0x28, 0x88, 0xDD, 0xEF, 0xDF, 0x00, 0x87, 0xBE, 0xBA,
		0xBF, 0xF9, 0x90, 0x61, 0xD4, 0xC2, 0xF6, 0x5B, 0x70, 0x0E, 0x71, 0x25, 0x50, 0x9F, 0x3B,
		0xFF
	},
	{
		0x2D, 0x97, 0x8F, 0xE8, 0x88, 0x1B, 0x6F, 0xF6, 0xC2, 0xD9, 0xBB, 0x51, 0xF4, 0x4B, 0x0C,
		0xDC, 0x0B, 0x36, 0xB2, 0xAA, 0xFA, 0x35, 0x5F, 0x8C, 0x85, 0x12, 0xCF, 0x31, 0x41, 0x84,
		0xC6, 0x04, 0x07, 0xF3, 0xA6, 0xCE, 0x43, 0x8E, 0x3E, 0x45, 0xB1, 0xB6, 0xAD, 0x2B, 0x7F,
		0x92, 0x9A, 0x89, 0x05, 0x9C, 0x0D, 0x73, 0x61, 0x30, 0x10, 0x9D, 0xAB, 0xEA, 0x86, 0x6A,
		0xC9, 0x1E, 0xE7, 0x5A, 0x9E, 0xBF, 0xCA, 0xC4, 0xB9, 0xA3, 0x96, 0xA5, 0x5E, 0xE4, 0x09,
		0x1F, 0xFD, 0xFB, 0xEE, 0x77, 0xD4, 0x06, 0xC8, 0xDE, 0x56, 0x57, 0xF9, 0xE5, 0x0E, 0xBC,
		0x60, 0x39, 0x53, 0x48, 0xD3, 0xCD, 0xDB, 0x14, 0x4F, 0xA8, 0x0F, 0xD8, 0x42, 0xC1, 0x80,
		0x7B, 0x46, 0x50, 0x54, 0x93, 0x58, 0xB3, 0x26, 0xF5, 0x22, 0x23, 0xF2, 0xB4, 0xBD, 0x01,
		0xAC, 0x74, 0xD7, 0x33, 0xA2, 0x4A, 0xE6, 0xD1, 0xDF, 0xD5, 0x67, 0x76, 0xB7, 0x03, 0x3B,
		0x3A, 0x5B, 0x8D, 0x69, 0x4D, 0x11, 0x49, 0x2E, 0xEC, 0x19, 0x7C, 0xBE, 0x08, 0x6D, 0x2A,
		0xBA, 0x70, 0xE1, 0x5C, 0x29, 0x3D, 0xB8, 0xDD, 0x17, 0x18, 0xE0, 0x02, 0x7A, 0x8A, 0x6C,
		0x20, 0x62, 0xE3, 0xCC, 0x4E, 0x82, 0x79, 0x2F, 0x38, 0x4C, 0xF8, 0x5D, 0x78, 0xF1, 0xE2,
		0x3C, 0x25, 0xA0, 0xF7, 0xC3, 0xA9, 0xFF, 0xEB, 0x87, 0x47, 0x55, 0x59, 0xAE, 0x81, 0x95,
		0x34, 0x83, 0x94, 0x7E, 0xD2, 0x9F, 0x2C, 0xC5, 0x71, 0xDA, 0x28, 0xED, 0x90, 0x1A, 0xFE,
		0xFC, 0x65, 0x24, 0xD0, 0x68, 0x27, 0x44, 0x75, 0x9B, 0x3F, 0xE9, 0x91, 0x40, 0x16, 0x15,
		0xC7, 0x52, 0x0A, 0x66, 0x98, 0xF0, 0x32, 0x63, 0xA1, 0xB5, 0x1D, 0xAF, 0x99, 0xCB, 0xB0,
		0x13, 0x21, 0xC0, 0xA4, 0xEF, 0x72, 0x37, 0xD6, 0x6E, 0xA7, 0x1C, 0x8B, 0x00, 0x64, 0x6B,
		0x7D
	}
};
 

typedef enum PROCESS_TYPE
{
	ENCRYPT = 0,
	DECRYPT = 1
};
 
const int KEYS_NUMBER = 256;
 
inline void process_data(const PROCESS_TYPE type, const BYTE(*keys)[KEYS_NUMBER], BYTE *pInData, BYTE *pOutData, const unsigned int uLen)
{
	for (unsigned int i = 0; i < uLen; ++i)
	{
		pOutData[i] = keys[type][ pInData[i] ];
	}
}
 
void printData(BYTE *data, int len)
{
    for (int i=0; i<len; i++)
        printf("0x%02X ", data[i]);
 
    printf("\n");
}

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i call crypto here:

void process_send(SOCKET s, const char* buf, int *len, int flags) {
	unsigned int command = (*(unsigned short*)buf);
		
			process_data(ENCRYPT, server_keys, buf, buf,*len);
		}

}

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return this error:

Error	1	error C2664: 'process_data' : cannot convert parameter 3 from 'const char *' to 'BYTE *'

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I cannot seem to adapt this... please help me :(
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Fabrice LambertConsulting
Distinguished Expert 2017

Commented:
Well ... first, unless you have a very valid reason, never use those jurrassic C-Style arrays in C++.
The type std::array exist for a reason, and is more safe, less error prone and don't decay to troublemaking raw pointers.

Concerning your issue:
Did you try static_cast ?
Yes, this error is correct, the buf passed to the function is a const char *, in words this means it's a pointer to const char, so the compiler has to throw an error in case the type is (implicit) changed to a none-const type.

This is good and correct, because when I call a function and pass a string to it I usually expect the string stays unchanged. Further there are cases where changing such a const char can lead to crash, i.e. when such a pointer is initialized using a string literal, i.e.:
const char* p = "hello world.";
char* p1 = (char*)p; // cast the 'const' away
p1[0] = 'H'

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I.e. compiled with VisualStudio this crashs due to an access violation because the compiler puts those string literals into memory segments which are read-only.

This even demonstrates that just casting away the const is not a good idea.

A type-safe solution would be to remove the const from the function declaration:
void process_send(SOCKET s, char* buf, int *len, int flags) { ... }

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Of course this will cause compile errors in cases where this function is called with a const char *, you have to fix these calls in another way, ensuring no real const texts are passed.

Const-ness is an important aspect in C/C++ and should always be considered.

Hope that helps,

ZOPPO

Author

Commented:
Hey Zoppo, i changed my cod to


void process_send(SOCKET s, char* buf, int *len, int flags) {

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How can I convert from char* to BYTE*?
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Fabrice LambertConsulting
Distinguished Expert 2017

Commented:
typedef unsigned char BYTE;

void myFunction(BYTE* in, size_t length);

/////////// MAIN ///////////
int main()
{
	
	char data[10];
	myFunction((BYTE*)data, 10);
	return 0;
}

void myFunction(BYTE* in, size_t length)
{

}

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But beware that if you persist with C-style arrays, you're running yourself into troubles.
>> How can I convert from char* to BYTE*?

You can simply cast is, i.e.:

char* text = strdup( "Hello world." );
BYTE* data = (BYTE*)text;


BTW: Just for interest I'd like to ask if there is any reason why you don't use any C++ functionality? Except the leading #include <cdstdio> everything seems to be pure C. Therefor I wrote the code I posted above in the same way, but the complete problem could probably be solved better/nicer/safer when using standard C++ functionalities and STL.

Best regards,

ZOPPO
Top Expert 2016

Commented:
never use those jurrassic C-Style arrays in C++.
that is not true in general. for example there is no better way in c++ to initialize  arrays with plain data like the crypto tables but to use c arrays.

and if those arrays are constant there is no reason to convert to std::array or std::vector.

if you need to change values you can combine both:

static BYTE keys[] = { 0x12, 0x34, 0xab, 0x00, ... };
static size_t NUMKEYS = sizeof(keys)/sizeof(keys[0]));
std::vector<BYTE> vkeys(&keys[0], &keys[NUMKEYS]);

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here the vkeys uses the fact that pointers to plain c arrays can be used as iterators for to copy the static data ino dynamic c++ template arrays.

Sara
Top Expert 2016

Commented:
but the complete problem could probably be solved better/nicer/safer when using standard C++ functionalities and STL.

the sample code is too short to decide whether c++ classes and STL give advantage. for example socket programming is highly made in c and using c++ types would require mcuh more efforts to convert from c++ to c types and reverse as if all is done with c types. that must not mean that you would use the ansi c compiler but simply use c++ where it fits better and use c where you have to provide data for a c interface.

Sara
Top Expert 2016

Commented:
void process_send(SOCKET s, char* buf, int *len, int flags) {

How can I convert from char* to BYTE*?

as Zoppo showed in his sample code you simply could cast the char* to BYTE* because char size is 1 byte same as BYTE which is typedef'd as

typedef unsigned char BYTE;

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i. e. a BYTE simply is an unsigned char what is an 8-bit unsigned integer (range 0 to 255) while char can be used as a signed 8-bit integer (if not used for text) where the highest bit (bit 7) is used as sign bit and the range is from -128 to +127.

void process_send(SOCKET s, char* buf, int *len, int flags) 
{
      BYTE * pbuf = (BYTE*)buf;  
      // now pbuf can be used wherever a writeable BYTE array was required
      // alternatively use buf if a char* or const char* is required
      // not 'len' should be the size of the buffer and not the length of any text within the buffer
      ...

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Sara
Consulting
Distinguished Expert 2017
Commented:
never use those jurrassic C-Style arrays in C++.
that is not true in general. for example there is no better way in c++ to initialize  arrays with plain data like the crypto tables but to use c arrays.
Allow me to disagree:
#include <iostream>
#include <array>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::array<char, 5> data_1{'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'};
    std::vector<char> data_2{'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j'};

    for(auto item: data_1)
        std::cout << item;
    std::cout << std::endl;
    for(auto item: data_2)
        std::cout << item;
    std::cout << std::endl;
    std::cin.get();
    return 0;
}

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And it work whatever the modifier is (static / const) for data_1 and data_2
As for giving the array (or vector) as parameters to C function, the data() member function exist for that purpose.
Plus, functions can return STL container objects (like almost any object).
Top Expert 2016

Commented:
the code you posted is c++-11 extension where you cannot rely on that it was available at the user's environment.

the initialization of c structures and arrays also would work for 2d and 3 d arrays and for complex and even nested structures.

you may try to initialize a std::array as it was done iin the original posted code for variable

     
BYTE server_keys[2][256]

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i personally don't use c++-11 enhancements (so it could well be that i am wrong) but have doubts that they are as mighty as c initializations.

Sara

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