vSphere licensing behavior on newer CPUs when core count is exceeded

Hi,

Anyone know how vSphere 6.x handles installation/operation if it is installed on a system that exceeds the license core count in the cpu?  The Essentials license has a max of 6(?) cores it is approved for.  It is pretty common to see 8+ cores.

I'm hoping it just ignores them rather than failing to install.

Thanks!

--Ben
Ben ConnerCTO, SAS developerAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Hi,

Anyone know how vSphere 6.x handles installation/operation if it is installed on a system that exceeds the license core count in the cpu?  The Essentials license has a max of 6(?) cores it is approved for.  It is pretty common to see 8+ cores.

I'm hoping it just ignores them rather than failing to install.

Thanks!

--Ben

Yes, very very common for a CPU to have move than 6 cores today, most desktops have at least 6 cores. You'll not have any issues see below. You are licensed per Socket!

VMware vSphere licenses are per Socket not Cores, so you can have as many Cores per socket as you like!

Essentials is Licensed for 6 Sockets or CPUs, not 6 Cores.

(This was changed many years ago!)

see here Page 3.

No Limits on Physical Resources
There are no restrictions on physical cores or physical RAM with vSphere and vSphere with Operations Management 6.5.

see here Page 8.
https://www.vmware.com/content/dam/digitalmarketing/vmware/en/pdf/products/vsphere/vmware-vsphere-vsom-pricing-whitepaper.pdf
0
 
SeanSystem EngineerCommented:
vsphere is licensed by CPU socket not by cores. With Essentials you get 6 CPUs meaning you can have 3 servers with 2 processors.

from vmware:
The vSphere Essentials Kit licenses are perpetual and does not expire. It includes 6 CPU licenses of vSphere Essentials (for 3 servers with up to 2 processors each) and 1 license for vCenter Server Essentials
0
 
Ben ConnerCTO, SAS developerAuthor Commented:
Oh my lord.  That changes everything.  I only populated the first slot of a dual CPU motherboard some time ago to avoid going over the limit.  I can now add the cpu/memory to that unused socket and not have to upgrade to a new system.  Sweet!

Thanks very much!

--Ben
0
 
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
And performance is far better on a dual processor system!
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.