site links for DR purposes

pma111
pma111 used Ask the Experts™
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when an organisation has a 'link' between 2 offices, e.g. a primary site with its core data centre, and a DR site whereby backups are written (or site resilience with 2nd infrastructure) to a DR site for disaster recovery etc, what actually constitutes that link, in terms of physical materials? And more importantly. kind of events/issues could break that link, leaving the primary site as a single point of failure, and what contingencies should organisations have in place for the event of the link breaking for whatever reason? I appreciate issues like earthquakes can damage physical infrastructure, but then smaller businesses only have so much budget for DR and 2nd sites etc etc.
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Commented:
Bad internet connectivity.
Bad networking configuration overall.
Bad switching.

So many different possible problems if you are supporting a real time in sync San to San solution.

You should have site failovers scripted and automated in advance to ease the impact of any such issues, software like VMware SRM would come highly recommended by myself and will help you avoid the guts of the issues above.
Distinguished Expert 2018
Commented:
when an organisation has a 'link' between 2 offices, e.g. a primary site with its core data centre, and a DR site whereby backups are written (or site resilience with 2nd infrastructure) to a DR site for disaster recovery etc, what actually constitutes that link, in terms of physical materials?
It's usually some sort of site-to-site connectivity (i.e. MPLS) which will involve fiber and copper wiring some multiple backbones and ISPs, along with the infrastructure on your side that's on both ends of the point to point connection. And concerns can be environmental (i.e. earthquakes), but you also have other things that can happen such as a fiber cut due to construction. This is why ISPs tend to need to have some sort of redundancy in their backbone. But from the customer standpoint, you either want to make sure that your ISP has this OR you can try to somehow have a failover of some sort. However, it is also possible that a fiber cut could affect the traffic of multiple ISPs.

But the three things mentioned by Mark Bill are things that can happen as well.

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