Visual Studio (neophite) Create an app with data stored separately

I'm looking into Visual Studio Community to get a start in Visual Studio programming (and to see if I like it). I believe I can create a standalone executable app in this free version. Am I correct?
My app will require database tables. Does Visual Studio come with a database server? What is the default in Visual Studio?
Do I need to obtain a separate data server like MySQL or MariaDB or something?
Philip WrightAsked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Ryan ChongBusiness Systems Analyst , ex-Senior Application EngineerCommented:
I believe I can create a standalone executable app in this free version. Am I correct?
yes, you can.

Does Visual Studio come with a database server?
nope, it didn't. but you probably can download other free database server online, such as MS SQL Express, MySQL, etc.

What is the default in Visual Studio?
.NET framework is rich in integration with commercial DBMS but if you want to say "default", it would probably MS SQL.

Do I need to obtain a separate data server like MySQL or MariaDB or something?
yes, you need to get one separately.
0
Fernando SotoRetiredCommented:
To your question,
I believe I can create a standalone executable app in this free version. Am I correct?
Yes you can create standalone executable applications and also Web applications in some of the many programming languages such as C#, Visual Basic .Net, C++, F# and some others.

To your question,
Does Visual Studio come with a database server?
No, not pre-packaged. You can download separately the Microsoft SQL Server 2017 Express edition which is free.

To your question,
What is the default in Visual Studio?
Visual Studio does not default to any database but MS SQL server integrates well.

To your question,
Do I need to obtain a separate data server like MySQL or MariaDB or something?
Well if you want to use a database either MS SQL Server or one of the other free servers will do.
1

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
Philip WrightAuthor Commented:
Thanks, LVL54 AND LVL64! That answers my question perfectly. I'm going to mark this question as resolved but I'll have to toss a coin to decide who gets 'Best Solution'!
One more quick question, which is a better free database server to play on?
MS SQL Server 2017 Express Edition
MySQL (now owned by Oracle, I understand)
MariaDB (I'm a big supporter of open-source development, so this one 'feels' right)

Can I easily move data from one SQL server type to another if I decide to change?

This is not actually as silly a question to ask as it might sound to a seasoned database expert.
I've recently been doing a project in Microsoft Access 2013. I was updating tables from the old FoxPro DBFs into a separate import database (accdb) and sorting everything.  But I was NOT able to pull the data from the import database into identical tables in my main data database. My approach was to clear the data system tables to empty and then fill them with the imported data.
Everything appeared to work fine. But when I checked the data, the data system tables had not actually been updated! The tables always contained the original data, even though I'd wiped all the relevant tables to empty. I first used simple built-in routines in Access. Then when that didn't work I wrote my own (fairly simple).
In NEITHER case were the final tables updated.
There was undoubtedly a reason for this, something to do with data integrity I was missing, perhaps. But it was surprising, nonetheless.
It wasn't essential, however, so I just scrapped the idea. I never really researched into the 'why'.
0
Philip WrightAuthor Commented:
I already left a closing comment. Oh, I'm glad to see you both got equal points awarded!
Thanks again, Ryan and Fernando!
0
Fernando SotoRetiredCommented:
Hi Philip;

To your question,
Which is a better free database server to play on?
Well I can't give you and answer to this question because I have not used many different DB systems I have used MS SQL Server and MySQL and I like them both and seem to work well.

To your question
Can I easily move data from one SQL server type to another if I decide to change?
I can not speak to other platforms but MS SQL Server has a tool called SQL Server Import and Export Wizard that can do some of what you need.

Hope that helps.
1
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Programming

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.