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Can I run client VMs on the Hyper-V manager and join them to the domain that my Hyper-V host is joined?

Hi,
I have a question.
Can I run client VMs, for example, Win 10 and Win 7 on the Hyper-V manager and join them to the domain that my Hyper-V host is joined to?

So, my Hyper-V machine supports Nested Virtualization. It is in Azure and It has  Standard E2s v3 (2 vcpus, 16 GB memory).

My other option just to prepare client VHD images using that HYPER-V machine and then spin a new Windows client machine from the custom image in Azure. Or would it be possible and would you recommend to have Windows Clients running on Hyper-V instead?
What are Cons and Pros for this? Would it cost less money to run just run one Hyper-v with multiple VMs instead of multiple servers in Azure?

If it is possible to join them to the domain, could you please share the link what do I need to configure.

thank you so much!
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creative555
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creative555
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
A minor point of clarification:  VMs don't run on Hyper-V Manager.   If you are using Hyper-V then they are running on Hyper-V itself, Hyper-V Manager is just a graphical tool. You can completely close Hyper-V manager and your VMs are still running.

WIth that said, it really depends on what you'll be using them for.   You can only use a client OS in Azure for dev/test:

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/windows-client-images-on-azure/

If this is for production use *at all* then Azure is not a good fit.

And if this *is* for dev/test, I would not use nested virtualization.  Spin up separate azure VMs and select the proper image from the image gallery. Otherwise you could find yourself in some legal hot water.
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creative555Author Commented:
Yes. It is for DEV/TEST. We dont have to worry about licenses. I just wanted to confirm that I will be able to join the domain if my VMs are on the Hyper-V Would that be cheaper to run on Hyper-V also instead of just running VM directly in Azure?
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creative555Author Commented:
Thank you very much, Cliff!!
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Based on my limited reading of the EULAs (I am not a lawyer), you can't legally run windows clients in Hyper-V on Azure.  Thus I stand by my previous answer; create Azure VMs and select the appropriate image. That is the only legal way to run windows clients in Azure as far as I am aware. Cheaper doesn't even play a decision here. Legality does.
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creative555Author Commented:
thank you!
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MaheshArchitectCommented:
you have two different questions.

U can join your nested VMs to Hyper-V host domain as long as you created external network switch on hyper-V host

Private and internal switches won't allow you to join machine to same domain as hyper-v as they are isolated network

To answer 2nd question:
I doubt you can use nested VMs in Azure as Azure is already running Hyper-V services in background, I have not tried that
I would not use nested VMs at least in Azure as I am myself creating unnecessarily single point of failure if hyper-v server goes down as, then again who will provide HA to those nested VMs? will you build Hyper-V cluster for same in Azure?
Azure is meant for virtualization cloud to save physical server and infra, but it not means use Azure server as virtualization host as far as my understanding
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
Can I run client VMs, for example, Win 10 and Win 7 on the Hyper-V manager and join them to the domain that my Hyper-V host is joined to?
Yes what you can do with physical machines you can do with virtual machines

When you ask is it cheaper to run locally than on the cloud..  The answer is it depends upon the many factors.. i.e. do you have spare compute and storage sitting idle? Or do you have to purchase new hardware so you have to factor in the cost of the hardware vs the per hour cost of the virtual machines (when they are running and not in a stopped state) .

I deal with 2 different industries that have a cyclical business.. Merchants that peak starting on black friday week and ending after christmas week. Other than in these rush periods say January-October they only need 100 web servers and 5 sql servers but in the rush period need up to 1,500 web servers and 500 sql servers so in a typical non-cloud situation you purchase the hardware to handle the maximum expected peak load and have some spare capacity.. If your predictions are way short of demand then you lose out as things  become unresponsive and people leave the sites (losing potential sales).  The converse is also true, you've spent money on a data center plant that could have been used for marketing, reducing the price, buying more of a popular item (the more you buy at one time the lower the unit price).  With typical hardware replacement cycle of every 3-5 years then the costs become more than trivial.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
@cliff a msdn subscription gives you client operating systems in Azure.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
@david: Agreed. Which is why I said that the OP should create Azure VMs and select the appropriate image from the gallery.  Since Azure also has portability rules and has some lift-and-shift options regarding server OSes under SA, running client OSes using nested virtualization is, at best, a grey area and is never how I'd run a client OS in azure.  Thus my statement (emphasis now added) "you can't legally run windows clients in *Hyper-V* on Azure."  I was specifically referring to the OPs approach of using Nested virtualization within another VM.

Earlier in the thread I did point out that running a client OS in Azure itself is allowed under some circumstances. While I didn't specifically call out MSDN, I pointed to an MS source that does:


WIth that said, it really depends on what you'll be using them for.   You can only use a client OS in Azure for dev/test:

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/windows-client-images-on-azure/

So yea, I'm comfortable with standing behind the answers I've already provided.  :)
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