plastic suited to hold gasoline / petrol ? cheapest containers for gasoline

I thought of using those 2 litre juice plastic bottles (like the Marigold ones) to hold gasoline as there's offer for gasoline currently.   But there are links in the Net that gasoline will dissolve plastic : is this true?

What are the cheapest containers to hold gasoline/petrol?
sunhuxAsked:
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David FavorLinux/LXD/WordPress/Hosting SavantCommented:
Do your research well. Many types of plastic interact with various petroleum + natural/food oils.

A bit of quick research suggests polyethylene is suitable for gasoline storage, which means gasoline won't dissolve this material.

And, I'd likely call a few companies specifically selling plastic gasoline storage containers (like ULINE) + ask them about their guarantee.

Also, very important, you must cycle gasoline regularly. I don't remember the frequency off the top of may head. I do remember, from my Dad's farming when I was a kid, that all petroleum tend to break down over time + if you run them through an engine, you'll destroy your engine.

So be sure + research this frequency + cycle/rotate your storage, where this means you use up all stored gasoline + refill your containers with fresh gasoline.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Cheap plastic containers (even clean one for food) will not store gasoline (or motor oil). Volatile substances. You can get certified red plastic containers for gasoline from the hardware or auto parts stores.
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sunhuxAuthor Commented:
Just recall that the large 18 litre kerosene metal (possibly zinc) container is quite common here.

Noted w thanks, will use up the stock & not keep gasoline for too long
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
The metal containers were certified once upon a time and should work
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dbruntonQuid, Me Anxius Sum?  Illegitimi non carborundum.Commented:
Make sure that any container you get is certified.  Keeping petrol in non-certified containers is risky and also any insurance company won't be happy with that.
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andyalderSaggar maker's framemakerCommented:
We're limited to store 30L in approved cans on private premises in UK, any more than that and you have to tell the authorities. there's a loophole in that you can buy an old car and fill that tank up if you have a driveway. My 5L approved container is HDPE, I don't think LDPE would be approved or safe.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
there normally are regulations on which containers can be used for storage of gasoline and pumping stations are forbidden from pumping gasoline into unapproved containers
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sunhuxAuthor Commented:
There are links on the Net that say  HDPE is not suitable but there are links that say it's suitable.

I just got a 5litre HDPE container from a hardware store: the store owner told me it's safe for gasoline & kerosene.

As for my fruit juice (quite hardy) container, I thought of testing with a little gasoline to see if it could hold.  Suppose it dissolves a bit of the plastic, will this  degrade or contaminate the gasoline to the extent that the gasoline become unsuitable for the car's  engine?
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Only use certified containers that you purchase locally and can see the certification. You want first to be safe and second to keep the gasoline clean.
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dbruntonQuid, Me Anxius Sum?  Illegitimi non carborundum.Commented:
>>  As for my fruit juice (quite hardy) container, I thought of testing with a little gasoline to see if it could hold.  Suppose it dissolves a bit of the plastic, will this  degrade or contaminate the gasoline to the extent that the gasoline become unsuitable for the car's  engine?

Impossible to say.

I'd be more concerned about insurance risk or landlord concern if you started doing that.  A certified container should state that it is designed to contain petrol.
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andyalderSaggar maker's framemakerCommented:
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
if it has the recycle symbol with the digit 1 then it is PET.  Another thing your typical bottle does not have is a metal screen used as a flame arrestor.  Most Gas Cans use high density polyethylene

#1 – PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate)
#2 – HDPE (High-Density Polyethylene)
#3 – PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride)
#4 – LDPE (Low-Density Polyethylene)
#5 – PP (Polypropylene)
#6 – PS (Polystyrene)

Firemen state do NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT use any container that is not rated to store gasoline. Not for a day, not for a minute. They are rated as such for the chemical resistance, and static discharge. They should have a stamped marking showing UL, or CSA, or some other international safety symbol. Your are putting the lives of yourself and anyone around the gasoline in danger
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