Multiple csr in 1 certificate

Hi Guys,

Is it possible to have multiple CSR's in one certificate?
Situation:
* In our local domain we have an wificontroller and printmanagement software we want to set to https. Both need csr for creation. Possible in 1 certificate?

Thanks 4 helping out!

Kind regards,
Alex
KOV_VZWAsked:
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systechadminConsultantCommented:
Can you please let me know if wifi controller and print software will be using same domain name?  Are you looking for Internal Certificate or Third party certificate?

Technically its not possible to create 1 CSR for multiple devices, you need to create separate CSR for each device you own in your environment.

But if you want to include multiple domain in single certificate, then you can go with SAN certificate.
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KOV_VZWAuthor Commented:
Hi Gaurav,

thanks for the reply!
The wificontroller and the printmonitoringsoftware will be in the same local domain and they can both generate a CSR file.

So the question is: can we use 2 CSR files in 1 certificate? Or do we need 2 certificates?

Thnx 4 commenting
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systechadminConsultantCommented:
Hi are you looking for Internal Certificate or Internal? If your domain is same. you can use single CSR for both Certificates. but it also depends on the Device how it takes it..
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David FavorLinux/LXD/WordPress/Hosting SavantCommented:
Your question is confusing.

First local only (non-routable) IPs can't really be covered by SSL certs, as the cert generation process (for most cert systems) requires a validation of host/domain DNS lookup to public IP, then placing a challenge file on that IP + then verifying the challenge file shows up.

In Registrar cases, if you own the domain through the Registrar + purchase a Registrar cert, this step may be skipped.

Your goal appears to be...

In our local domain we have an wificontroller and printmanagement software we want to set to https.

Then later you say...

The wificontroller and the printmonitoringsoftware will be in the same local domain.

I think you may be misunderstanding how HTTPS coverage works.

If both of these are referenced by the same IP, then likely they'll have the same host records... like...

wifi.foo.com + print.foo.com

So, they'd both be covered by the same SSL cert.

Also, SSL certs only cover certain protocols, like HTTP + IMAP + POP3 + SMTP authenticated mail submission.

So certs don't cover software, they cover certain types of software where server config will integrate an SSL cert + then clients are SSL aware + will connect to SSL, when possible, like a Chrome browser or Email client.

If you're trying to cover your WiFi Web interface, when your WiFi device requires some way to upload an SSL cert into your device.

Same with your print system, whether it's a device or software daemon, it will require some way to integrate an SSL cert.
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David FavorLinux/LXD/WordPress/Hosting SavantCommented:
Also, if you use https://LetsEncrypt.org, providing free certs for years now, then the LE client handles all CSR generation details.

I haven't generated a manual CSR file in years, since LE handles this auto magically.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
@david favor what you are seeing is a server certificate,
First local only (non-routable) IPs can't really be covered by SSL certs, as the cert generation process (for most cert systems) requires a validation of host/domain DNS lookup to public IP, then placing a challenge file on that IP + then verifying the challenge file shows up. you are referring to a domain validated certificate from a public certificate authority. This is only a small subset of digital certificates.

Certificates are used for identification and authorization as well as encryption.

 there are many kinds of certificates i.e. Code Signing Certificate
This certificate is intended for the following purposes:
  1. Ensures software came from software publisher
  2. Protects software from alteration after publication
Client Authentication (1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.2)
Server Authentication (1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.1)
Key Encipherment, Data Encipherment (30)

A CSR is usually a 1-1 for the certificate issued you can add Subject Alternative Names or more common names. You then import the certificate on the machine that created the CSR then export the certificate AND the private key to a .pfx file then import that file on other machines that have the SAN or CN
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KOV_VZWAuthor Commented:
OK
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