Move Storage Space on Windows 10

I have four SATA drives configured as a storage space in Windows 10. These drives are data drives as the OS is located on a separate SSD.

I have a problem with the computer hardware and I need to move the four sata drives configured as Windows storage space to another computer.

Do I just need to connect these to another computer that has 4 spare SATA connections and this will be recognised and accessible by another OS installation (it's also running Windows 10) or is there anything else in particular that I need to do?
HypervizorAsked:
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James BunchSystems EngineerCommented:
Is the storage drives configured in a RAID array of any type or are they all independent?

If they are standalone hard drives, you can simply shut the machine down, unhook them and plug them into a new machine and they will work. You may have to assign drive letters in the Disk Manager but that is unusual.

If they are in a RAID Array, that is a different can of worms and not as easily accomplished.
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McKnifeCommented:
Try within 2 VMs. Costs you half an hour and then you know.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
A major selling point of storage spaces is that it is portable.  *BUT* you really should only move between the same versions of an OS.  So if you are on windows 10 1709, don't try to put the drives into a machine running windows 10 1703.  And make sure the new machine exposes the drives directly to the OS.  Many motherboards tend to come preconfigured for RAID and that doesn't play well with storage spaces.
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HypervizorAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the answers so far. I forgot to mention that there is no underlying hardware RAID, however I did setup the storage pool with parity so they are all grouped together - so this is RAID but the software RAID that is part of storage spaces/pools.

@Cliff Galiher - it was my understanding as well, i.e. you could move between the same versions of an OS. However, I've no idea if they are on exactly the same update level of Windows 10. I didn't think the minor update version of the OS would matter?
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Minor updates don't matter. Or at least they aren't supposed to and I've never seen an instance when they do.  But it all depends on what you consider a major vs a minor update.  With Microsoft's current stance that "windows 10" is the definitive version and there won't be a "windows 11"  ...major builds are the 6-month or so milestones.   Anniversary update (aka 1607), Creator's Update (aka 1703), and Fall Creators Update (aka 1709) are major builds.  Minor builds would be the November update for 1709.  

Can you take drives that had the November update for 1709 installed and put them into a machine that doesn't yet have that update?  You should be able to, yes.  But can you put them into a machine that doesn't have 1709 at all?  That's far more risky.
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HypervizorAuthor Commented:
I would definitely be putting the disks into another computer which has a later version as it’s the one I use all the time. To be honest I think they’re both up to date.

So, literally after putting the disks in the other computer they should be accessible in My Computer as the storage pool I configured?
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McKnifeCommented:
I have no doubts that it should work, but again as with any important operation you never did before: If you can, stage it in a VM, instead of using live data.
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HypervizorAuthor Commented:
That's the issue, I can't because the workstation the disks are in have died so there's no way to get to the data - hence the original question.

Thanks for the input though.
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McKnifeCommented:
You didn,t understand me, I was giving general advice and it had nothing to do with the old hardware. I suggested to do test runs on a virtual machine :-)
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HypervizorAuthor Commented:
OK, I see what you’re saying, ie to create VMs with the same configurations as old and new and rest. It’s a good idea and may try that if I can’t get the original hardware issue fixed.
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McKnifeCommented:
Right. The virtual drives to test with can be small (1 GB) - it takes only minutes to install and test.
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