VMWare out of disk space.

Hi all,

I having a little trouble with an ESXi guest that seemingly has run out of room.

i think i initially got this msg:

Grab
I then went through the Snapshot Manager and deleted that snapshot, but i'm still getting this msg:

GrabIMG_20171229_080718386.jpg
Go-BruinsAsked:
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
This is caused by a snapshot.

Snapshot is still being written to...

Snapshot Deletion probably failed because the parent virtual machine is locked, read only.

So the question what has caused the parent virtual machine disk to be come locked ?

Backup Appliance, Third Party Backup e.g. Veeam still running, or have the parent virtual machine attached ?

Check!
Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
I think what happened is that I specified that the virtual disk be a total of 750GB, when the total capacity was 950GB.

It just ran out of room?

The snapshot does seem to have been deleted. When I browse, it's not longer there.
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
750GB, fixed size disk out of 950GB leaves 200GB free!

-00001.vmdk is a snapshot filename, error message seems consistent with snapshot cannot grow any more datastore is full.

can you please check if the file exists on the datastore and the VM is writing to it.
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
The file appears to be gone, and the VM is turned off.

screen
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
okay.....mysterious as to why the file has vanished...

can you turn it back on ? or do you get an error message ?

also checking disk properties in the VM will also confirm if it's still writing to the snapshot..
Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
The file was manually removed by me via the Snapshot Manager.

When I try to start machine, i get this:

IMG_20171229_090141942_BURST000_COVE.jpg
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
can you please explain ?

The file was manually removed by me via the Snapshot Manager.

did you delete the file from datastore using the browser ?

What ever has happened the snapshot has vanished, and VM could now be corrupted?

Do you have a backup to restore?
Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
It's a little fluzzy, but the machine was not responsive. So i think i shut it down, then deleted that snapshot using the Snapshot Manager. After deleting the snapshot, the particular file did indeed seem to have been deleted.

IMG_20171229_090635214.jpg
Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Assuming that the snapshot file is gone forever, Do i have no recourse but to restore from backup?
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Do i have no recourse but to restore from backup?

No, because your data in the snapshpot is gone, so the VM is out of date and possibly now corrupt.
Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
I do believe the backup was created while the VM was live and ok.
Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
The backup was created using traditional backup software like Macrium.
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Well you'll now need to restore, with what ever procedure you use to restore.

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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
I do remember having a discussion where you should typically set aside about 20% of drive space for snapshots, etc. Is that not enough? Especially If I'm going to use snapshots?
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
20-30% reserve recommended.

We would not recommend using them for this very reason! [unless required to support third party backup actvities e.g. Veeam]
Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
OK - so no snapshots going forward for me.
Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Thanks so much.
Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
It would be nice to be able to more gracefully handle a situation like this. In theory, I wish I could have gone into the guest and freed up some space. But because it was completely locked up, I couldn't.
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
It would be nice to be able to more gracefully handle a situation like this. In theory, I wish I could have gone into the guest and freed up some space. But because it was completely locked up, I couldn't.

If you are unaware of what to do, STOP and POST a Question to EE.

Dangerous Things snapshots, which need to be handled with care, and monitored daily, otherwise they will consume ALL your disk space, and the VM will stopped, and end in corruption.
Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Thanks. Lesson learned.
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