how to connect a printer through a vpn

there is this company that purchased a lazerjet printer the other day and we are now needing to get it to print over a vpn.  can someone help me out with this?
the printer is located in a office that is about 20 miles away from the main server.  In this office we have the printer and two computers and are accessing the server over a vpn network. We are needing the server to see the printer in our office and print to it.
beemmerAsked:
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8046586Commented:
Let say that your Server IP address is 192.168.1.1 and your new HP printer is 192.168.2.50.
On the server add new a printer and manually add Standard TCP/IP port 192.168.2.50, install the driver for the printer, share the printer and list it in AD.
All desktops in the network 192.168.1.0 can add network printer connecting the shared through the server.
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8046586Commented:
As I can understand your question, you would like to print from your central office (server location) to a site where you have two desktops and printer. Those two desktops are accessing the server over the VPN. If this is right then instead of direct VPN dial from desktop to server, you need modems or routers on both sides with VPN features and IPSec connection between the sites.
With hardware VPN you can print in and from both directions.
If I misunderstand your scenario, please describe what exactly you want to achieve and I will give you different advice.
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
First of all let me confess: i work every day on computers-rebuild dig out viruses etc,.  But I do very little networking and hardly ever do vpn.  That being said, I am a little in the dark as to what I am doing.  
You are understanding me right.  and we do have routers on both sides.  No one has said anything about IPSec but I am assuming that also is in place.  
they had a brother printer and it was connected and working through the VPN but now we can't seem to get the hp laserjet to connect.
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
I will be glad to send some screenshots if that would help.
I am now at my office connected remotely to to the computers at the place of business where the two workstations and the printer is.
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
Ok, is this where you are talking about? if so, which one do I choose?
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8046586Commented:
Add local printer, I believe this is ob the server
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
Here is the next screen. Use existing port?
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8046586Commented:
Create New Port, Standard TCP/IP and add the new printer IP address
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
The selection is: Hostname or Ip address:
and
Port name:

Do I put in the Hostname or IP address bar like this \\192.168.1.71?
and what do I put in the Port name?
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8046586Commented:
no just the IP address, 192.168.1.71, I believe this IP address is static on the printer
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
yes i assume it is static.  now am I ready to click next?
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8046586Commented:
yes, next
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
Here is the result.
I am positive the address is correct.  it is well memorized.
One thing i noticed this morning that as long as the local workstation is not connected to the server and I do a ping it sees the printer fine.  as soon as I connect to the server the local workstation can no longer ping to the printer.  Is this normal?
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8046586Commented:
Generic Card, Next
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
in order for me to be able to ping to the printer again I have to close out the VPN and restart the computer
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
Here is a little HowTo that tells how to set up a network printer under these circumstances.
It works .... just works!

I'm a peer-to-peer networking guy and likely viewed as a Neanderthal to many.  Don't be misled by their unkind thoughts.  :-)
I don't like to use print servers because they represent a single point of failure and only make life easier for network admins.
I prefer to set up the printers on the workstations just as it appears you're doing.
As far as I'm concerned, doing anything else adds complexity and, often, confusion.  When one breaks, they can all break.

Now, as far as using VPN goes, if you can reach a computer on the same subnet as the printer then this should work in setting up the printer on a remote computer.
I can see that you have computers that reach the Server over the VPN.
But, can the Server see those computers as well?  I can only imagine that it should but it's a good test.
If the server can see those computers then it should be able to see the printer.
In that case, it must be able to ping the printer's IP address on the remote subnet.
If all that's the case then the instructions should work.
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8046586Commented:
How do you connect the server? Are you using remote desktop?
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
now it is prompting me to choose a printer from the list.  let me see what i can do with that...
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
in order for me to be able to ping to the printer again I have to close out the VPN and restart the computer

That does not make any sense. Are you perhaps using PPtP VPN instead of IPsec?  Do you have Split Tunneling enabled?  That is normal for IPsec VPN.

I think you said the printers have static IP addresses. Make sure these printer addresses are on the local subnet. They probably are, but check.
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
Now I am at the screen that says "installing printer"  We are doing way more tonight then the last 3 days thanks to you
Ok, now I am at this screen.  What next?
Yes, I believe I am using a remote desktop. I give you a screenshot..
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
I think looking back here the printer is on a workstation in which case it should be shared. I normally keep all printers on a network by themselves. Then they are not shared.
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
I opened up the old brother printer that was replaced and it wasn't shared.  
It is shared on the workstation.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Was it on a network connection by itself?  Most likely.
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
I meant the new hp printer is shared on the workstation
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
If you are trying to work remotely without using the remote workstation - that is, just printing to the remote printer, it should probably be on its own network connection and then set the drivers to that network address (which I thought is what you were doing many steps back here).
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
I think you said the printers have static IP addresses. Make sure these printer addresses are on the local subnet. They probably are, but check.
how do I check if they are on the local subnet?  (I know i sound dumb, but i hardly ever work with this kind of things.)
and yes I think it is on a connection by itself.  the server is connected to other branches and each branch has it's own printer. I took looked at two other printer properties and neither one of them are shared. So it seems like this printer should not be shared either since no other branch will use this printer.
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
Let us not be confused between network printers connected via Ethernet or wireless and printers that are connected (via USB) to ONE computer.  A network printer should never be shared by any of the computers that it's being installed onto.  There's no need as the printer is available on the network with NO sharing by any old random computer.

Network printers will always have an IP address of their own.  You could use SoftPerfect Network Scanner on the network local to the printer to get all the devices IP addresses.  Version 6.1.4 should work for you free.  You should see the local router, the two computers and the printer as separate devices.  

The instructions I sent should suffice to do the entire job for network printers.  
Try it with one of the local computers near the printer.

In the mean time, can the Server ping the printer or not?
Some printers have a control panel with which you can access the network settings.]
Or, you can often have it print a configuration report that will tell you the IP address.

Simply, if the first 3 octets of the address are the same then the devices are on the same subnet:
192.168.1.xxx are all on the same subnet.
192.168.2.yyy are all on another subnet.
etc.
They *might* be different like this:
10.1.0.xxx
vs.
10.2.0.yyy
But either way, the first 3 are the same for the same subnet in most networks... just not all.
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beemmerAuthor Commented:
I would like to say that I learned a lot on this.  however the company suddenly called in someone else to finish the job without telling me anything and would not answer or return any of my calls, so I guess they got it going  one way or other.  Thanks so much for your help.
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micheal johnPrinter Support ExpertCommented:
all things considered, in the event that you have a print server on the system, and your outside clients are VPN'd in, they ought to have the capacity to ping to the address of that print server. In the event that they can, you can guide them through the Add Printer Wizard, have them physically design another Standard TCP/IP port, and afterward include the print drivers. After that you ought to be ready.
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