MS Azure Backup

Looking for backup software/solution that can be installed & managed in one central location & backup data files that are located on many remote Windows servers that are network accessible to the central location. The backup software should support backing up to MS Azure in the cloud. Will Azure Backup Server v2 or SCCM or DPM be practical for this scenario? I'm not familiar with any of these softwares. Or perhaps a different solution...
yohayonAsked:
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Azure backup Server is really for Azure only. You won't have long-term local retention.  SCDPM will do this though if you want.  SCCM is not a backup solution.  There are other third parties that could do what you want as well.  I've seen people set up ShadowProtect to back up to a central location then back up the central location to azure, just as an example.  Any product that stores their backup in a image/file-based format vs a proprietary database would work well with a similar setup.
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yohayonAuthor Commented:
I do have SBS with Exchange as well as W2012R2, so I dont believe DPM can backup exchange to azure
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Yes, it can.
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yohayonAuthor Commented:
it could exchange but not SBS since I dont see it listed in the matrix https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj860400(v=sc.12).aspx
In general, will DPM deploy MABS? if it does, then WMF will break SBS
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
MABS *is* a reskinned version of DPM, minus some features.  So DPM doesn't deploy MABS, but they are the same basic code.

As for your second, I think you misunderstood what I was suggesting.  I don't ever recommend installing LOB apps on a domain controller.  That *includes* SBS.

If you have an existing member server that doesn't conflict with Azure Backup Server or DPM, you could deploy either onto that server.  If you don't, you can spin up a new server (physical or virtual) and deploy DPM or Azure Backup Server on that.  I would not install *any* heavy backup program (not third party either) on SBS.  Its bad from a security practice, and from practical experience, any 3rd-party app tends to make SBS fall over from too much memory overcommitment.  I've seen it time and time again from backup programs to antivirus management programs that install light SQL instances, or their own JET databases....it doesn't take much to push SBS off the brink.

Once you have a member server with DPM/Azure Backup, to back up Exchange, you'd install the *AGENT* on SBS.  The agent does not require nor install any breaking framework components.  And the agent supports Exchange (as just mentioned), SQL (for sharepoint/WSUS), and system state components (for ADDS role data), plus regular files, of course.  Meaning that yes, DPM and Azure Backup can absolutely back up SBS.  That doesn't mean you install the *management* components on SBS.  Two different topics.

-Cliff
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yohayonAuthor Commented:
Thank you. Will DPM provide a centralized backup view vs MABS which will not? As well, can you review this info in this link here as it seems to say different than what you have written. http://blog.ciaops.com/2017/01/issues-with-azure-file-backup-on-sbs.html
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
What is your definition of "centralized view?"  DPM and MABS will basically show the same info in this regard.  I find it centralized as far as needs go when azure is the primary target (which is the only why you'd use MABS).

The last time I installed the azure backup agent, WMF 3.0 was *not* a requirement for the agent.  Only for the management server.  If that has changed, I am not aware of it.  With all components of SBS out of standard support, and with Exchange 2010 not fully supporting Outlook 2016, and with WSUS 3.2 not supporting windows 10, I phased out SBS with all of the clients I had using it a couple years back, so that may be a requirement that isn't officially listed and slipped under my radar.  YMMV on that front.  But I've also seen a lot of just random assumptions and misinformation. I'd want to test lab it to know for myself.

But again, given standard support cycles, I migrate off anything more than a year or two in extended support.  The deltas just get too great and interoperability breaks down, even when "security" patches are still getting released.  SBS is getting very long in the tooth.  It's usually cheaper to upgrade than it is to work through labbing complex scenarios.
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yohayonAuthor Commented:
Yes, makes sense to phase out sbs but in the interim this is the way it is.
When I say centralized, I mean is there the ability to deploy agents or backup remote lan accessible servers via a console? Visible backup status & jobs running from main console?
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Yes. The agents are basically headless. Data and status is all managed from that pane of glass. The only thing that wouldn't be reported there is if you set up the OSes that support direct-to-Azure backups to do so (bypassing DPM/Azure Backup Server.)  But if you are using DPM/Azure Backup, you usually wouldn't use that split configuration.

If the servers you want to back up are operating over a very slow link, then sure, I could see some benefit to operating two vaults. And yes, monitoring would not inherently be a single pane of glass experience. But I can't think of a product that would operate in a hybrid setup that *would* be.   That's probably the point I'd look into OMS or similar that can consolidate reporting from multiple products.  Which is nothing new. Whether SCOM, or other, consolidating operations has been a big industry for decades. OMS just expands that into the Azure world and I've seen other OM products with Azure support as well.  

-Cliff
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yohayonAuthor Commented:
Just to confirm, both DPM & MABS will provide somewhat of a centralized backup interface to remotely deploy & manage backups on remote servers? If yes, is there a benefit to DPM vs MABS?
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
DPM is more full featured.  If you want to do long term disk based retention, grandfather-father-son type relationships, backup to tape....all would be DPM-only scenarios.

If your primary goal is to store snapshots on disk short term with Azure as your only long term retention method, Azure Backup Server would suffice. I'd see no real benefit to DPM in that specific scenario.

And to re-iterate, I don't have any SBS systems currently in this setup anymore.  Given the blog post you found, I would not try this in production.  I'd recommend labbing it to verify the current backup agent requirements if Azure Backup Server is your goal.  

-Cliff
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yohayonAuthor Commented:
Just to confirm, both DPM & MABS will provide somewhat of a centralized backup interface to remotely deploy & manage backups on remote servers?
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
*FROM* remote servers. *TO* Azure. Yes.
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yohayonAuthor Commented:
I didnt understand your last comment whether there is one centralized management area to deploy agents & manage multiple servers in different locations
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yohayonAuthor Commented:
Cliff, or anybody else can you reply to my last comment?
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
The comment one before last was "provide somewhat of a centralized backup interface to remotely deploy & manage backups on remote servers"

And it all depends on what your definition of "on" where I've put that in bold.  DPM allows you to store backups *on* another server, such as windows storage server, or over iSCSI, or a variety of other non-Azure scenarios, or where Azure is not the sole final destination.  So my follow-up comment was meant to clarify the vagueness of the question.

DPM and Azure Backup can back up *from* multiple servers *to* azure (note that I never used the word "on" either way) and can manage those backups from a single pane of glass. But if you want to back up *TO* another server (which some people would say is backing up "on" another server), Azure Backup cannot do that.  Thus the need to clarify.
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Windows Server 2012

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