The great Pound Symbol Vote

There is no right or wrong answer to this question.

While asked in the spirit of fun, I'm genuinely interested in your response.

Everyone who participates will be given equal credit when this question is finally closed, as well as a Thumbs Up on your comment, so long as your response is genuine.

The Question

If I say "Pound Symbol", which "symbol" immediately comes to your mind?

Is it this £ ?

This # ?

Or something else?

I ask you do not research your answer before giving it, as I'm interested in what immediately pops into your mind when the above question is asked. Remember there is no such thing as a "wrong answer"

You're also requested to include what part of the world you're from. US, UK, AUS etc... in your comment.

Thanks :)
LVL 19
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
#
US

But if you showed me the symbol and asked the first thing that popped into my mind, I'd say octothorpe, as in these EE articles:
https://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/29416/
https://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/31560/
:)
1
Phil SmithCommented:
Hi Andrew

I'm from Aus and I think £ for pound and # is hash

Thanks
3
Obaid ur RehmanTechnical and Operations ManagerCommented:
#, I am from Pakistan.
1
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als315Commented:
£, RU
1
Edwin HofferTechnical ExpertCommented:
£ Pound #PoundfromUK
1
bsodCommented:
I immediately thought 'lb' which was the symbol we used for the weight measure where I grew up and, though I was always aware that some people used '#' for the weight, I'm accustomed to calling '#' a hash[mark] from my programming days.

I expect to hear "Pound Sterling" before I think '£' unless the context is clearly monetary.

Canada/USA
2
Blue Street TechLast KnightCommented:
Hi Andrew,

#, USA. Although I'm accustom to hearing the "pound sign" as well.

I looked this up afterwards for kicks.
Merriam Webster thinks first of £ then #. Odd too because they have strictly American origins.
REF: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pound%20sign
1
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
The score thus far...

£ = 3
# = 3
lb = 1

It's neck and neck. Thanks to those of you that have commented.  

For those who've visited but not commented, please do take the few seconds to add your input.
1
Mark WillsTopic AdvisorCommented:
It is of course contextually sensitive.

But if I was asked to submit a keyboard entry, I would probably default to hash sign which is totally incorrect.

And because the pound symbol is not present an us-style keyboards, it is a little unfair.

It is rarely used as "symbol" in british use - it is sign. If in doubt, ask Wiki : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number_sign



However

£ = Pound
# = hash (and often used as number of)
1
dbruntonCommented:
I'm aware of both.  Unsure of which would pop into mind on an on the spur moment.

I'm from NZ.
1
Kostas KostasIT AdministratorCommented:
Hi Andrew

£  

and i am from Greece
1
woolmilkporcCommented:
£
Germany
1
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Hi Mark,
And because the pound symbol is not present an us-style keyboards, it is a little unfair.
Don't think of it in the context of fair or unfair. That's not the point of the question.

The point is simple "If I say "Pound Symbol", which "symbol" immediately comes to your mind?"

There's no right or wrong - I just want to know which "symbol" immediately pops into the minds of the Experts Exchange community when the question is asked.

Thanks for your input!

Revised Tally
  • £ = 6
  • # = 3
  • lb = 1
  • Not Sure (Nothing comes to mind) = 1
0
Mark WillsTopic AdvisorCommented:
Ok then I change my answer.... First thought when asked "what symbol for pound" - I'm with bsod.

Pound Symbol = lb

Aus
1
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Revised Tally
  • £ = 5
  • # = 3
  • lb = 2
  • Not Sure (Nothing comes to mind) = 1
0
Dennis AriesCEO @ Arkro ITCommented:
£ for  Pound (# is used as hash)

I'm from the Netherlands.

Cheers.
1
nobusCommented:
£ for Belgium
i did not even know # was used for it !
1
McKnifeCommented:
In many telcos you are asked by a friendly robot voice to "press the pound or hash sign", and they talk about "#".
I never heard "pound symbol" anywhere, let's see how you make a vote out of this ;-)
From germany
2
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
I never heard "pound symbol" anywhere, let's see how you make a vote out of this ;-)

Easy! That puts you in the "Not Sure" camp :)

New Tally

  • £ = 7
  • # = 3
  • lb = 2
  • Not Sure (Nothing comes to mind) = 2

So many views, so few responses.

C'mon members, it just takes a few seconds to add your input.  You're already here so please do so

Kudos to all those that have put in a comment!

:-)
0
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
£ = GBP
# = Skunk (if you mention on the UK streets today)

or hashtag!

from the UK....

I don't have a Bitcoin symbol on my lkeyboard yet so B#
1
Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
I'm with McKnife on "pound symbol"...never use that phrase...the operative phrase is "pound sign"...but I'll still go with "octothorpe". :)

I suspect the voting would be different if the Title were "The great Pound Sign Vote" and the question were:

If I say "Pound Sign", what character/symbol immediately comes to your mind?
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Definition of symbol

noun
1. something used for or regarded as representing something else; a material object representing something, often something immaterial; emblem, token, or sign.
2. a letter, figure, or other character or mark or a combination of letters or the like used to designate something:
the algebraic symbolx; the chemical symbol Au.
3. (especially in semiotics) a word, phrase, image, or the like having a complex of associated meanings and perceived as having inherent value separable from that which is symbolized, as being part of that which is symbolized, and as performing its normal function of standing for or representing that which is symbolized: usually conceived as deriving its meaning chiefly from the structure in which it appears, and generally distinguished from a sign.

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/symbol

:^)
0
QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
German jury vote: £
1
Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
The definition of "symbol" is completely irrelevant. The question is (or should be), what comes to mind when you hear "pound sign"? I've never heard the phrase "pound symbol" when referring to # — it's "pound sign" for those of us in that camp.
1
Eoin OSullivanConsultantCommented:
POUND = £
HASH = #

Ireland = IE
1
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
The question is (or should be)

Hey wait a minute, this is my question! lol  

Don't forget this was posted in the spirit of fun too.

Let's not argue semantics.  symbol = sign = symbol = sign - [whichever makes more sense to you]

It could be argued that a pound 'sign' would make people think of this...

A Pound Sign
Me, I'm thinking "symbols" when I see things like £ @ # $ % but that detracts from the original question. Most folks know what I'm asking. :)

Tally Update

  • £ = 10
  • # = 3
  • lb = 2
  • Not Sure (Nothing comes to mind) = 2

The question will be left open for a couple of days so please do contribute if you haven't already done so.

Huge thanks to those of you that have participated so far! :)
1
speed_54Commented:
£= pound as in money
lb= pound as in weight
#= hash

From NZ
1
bsodCommented:
re: symbol vs sign — I think they're interchangeable in this instance, and preference may come down to local usage. For example, I'm used to hearing '$' called a dollar sign, and '¢' called a cent symbol. So it wouldn't have mattered if Andrew said symbol or sign or doohickey in his Q, I still would have focused on the obvious keyword: pound.

As proof of this logic, I called a number that I know will ask me to enter a passcode and press '#'.  Ambiguity being a bad thing in machine instruction, the recorded voice told me to "enter your passcode and press the pound key. The takeaway from this is that "symbol" and "sign" are sufficiently ambiguous for either to serve the OP's question.
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
£= pound as in money
lb= pound as in weight
#= hash

Haha.. Onya speed_54!

In Australia, we call that a "2 bob each way" bet.

Which was the "first" symbol that popped into your mind though?
0
speed_54Commented:
£
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Thanks for clarifying speed_54..  

Your contribution is endorsed! :)
0
Radhakrishnan RSenior Technical LeadCommented:
When you say 'Pound Symbol' - This comes to my mind £ (British Pound). I'm from India and and my keyboard doesn't have Pound symbol, but i need to use this symbol for many purposes, so i use ALT+0163=£

This is 'Hash' - #
1
Atdhe NuhiuCommented:
From the UK so obviously £. I do know that for some people it refers to what we call hash.
1
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
#, as I live in the US, so I think in terms of weight instead of money.

 The "#" symbol has been used for many, many years in the US to represent an abbreviation for lbs (weight).

 It's wasn't until it started to be used in conjunction with Twitter that it started to be called "Hash".

 So age will play a role here too.

Jim.
1
leakim971PluritechnicianCommented:
Hi, I'm french from Guadeloupe but my sister live in UK from at least 15 years ago.
For me pound is £. If someone asked me how to call #, my answer would be "sharp" like C#... my bad !
1
max_the_kingCommented:
£

that's what comes to my mind at first hand

please note that good old Peter Gabriel made a wonderful song with double sense: "Selling England by the Pound", I guess indicating just 2 meanings ( £ and lib)

max
1
RobOwner (Aidellio)Commented:
Pound symbol I go straight to thinking of an action like the operator saying "type your number and press the pound key" so it's: # from me.

I do agree with Mark that it's contextually sensitive... if we were talking about money (and only money) and you asked "what do you think of when I say pound sign", I'd say £ (anyone actually find that symbol or just copy and paste from the question or a comment LOL?)

The fact we're sitting at a keyboard subconsciously leans me to #.  This is also as I am aware of both symbols being called "pound".

still going with # LOL

Rob
Aus
1
it_saigeDeveloperCommented:
£ = British Pound
# = Number Sign (in math); Sharp (in music); Octothorpe (in telecomm); Hashtag (in Twitter); Pounds (in weight)

Interestingly enough, it's most common usage today as "Hashtag" is not far off from it's earliest English usage.
Entymoligists identified the symbols usage as early as the 15th century for "hatch", which meant interwoven strips of metal and was derived from the Old French word hacher or hache.

- Source

Learn something new everyday...  :D

-saige-
1
Bill PrewCommented:
For me (USA) it's pound sign would be "#", although that wouldn't be the default way I would refer to that symbol.  I'll prefer "number sign" or "ochothorpe"...

Some interesting reading...



»bp
1
Thomas Zucker-ScharffSolution GuideCommented:
Hi Andrew,

It was immediately

# for me (US)

Tom
1
woolmilkporcCommented:
As for this „#“ thing - not long ago many people here in Germany called it „Gartenzaun“ (garden  fence) or „Lattenzaun“ (picket fence) or even „Teppich“ (carpet). Funny but illustrative ...

wmp
0
Scott Fell, EE MVEDeveloper & EE ModeratorCommented:
I agree with Mark, it depends on the context.  

For me, if you said, "use the pound sign" and were not referring to currency, #
1
Tim LapinComputer Consultant (Desktop analyst)Commented:
I would say that it is contextual for me, which might be based on my country:   Canada

Pound sign or symbol:         #
If currency is mentioned:    £
If weight is mentioned:        lb

However, if I have to pick one and only one notation as the general case, I would pick:     #
1
Tom GrellCOMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTCommented:
#   US
1
Michael VasilevskySolutions ArchitectCommented:
# -  from US
1
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
(anyone actually find that symbol or just copy and paste from the question or a comment LOL?)

I cheated and copied it from a google search to write the question  :)

still going with # LOL

And an Aussie no less!  Traitor!  lol

Latest Tally Update!

  • £ = 16
  • # = 10
  • lb = 2
  • Not Sure (Nothing comes to mind) = 2

Where the votes have come from so far...

  • USA  11
  • Australia    3
  • Pakistan        1
  • Russia   1            
  • United Kingdom   3
  • Greece    1
  • New Zealand    2
  • Germany    4
  • Netherlands   1      
  • Ireland    1
  • India    1
  • France    1
  • Unknown   1

Once again, kudo's to everyone who's made a comment.

Some interesting stats developing here so please keep that input coming folks!
0
Tim LapinComputer Consultant (Desktop analyst)Commented:
Hi Andrew,

You'll need to update that country list to include my reply.  See my post about 3 above yours.

For the record:  Canada
0
Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:
Another U.S. vote for # = pound sign, or pound symbol, or pound

My programming days started in the 70s and most of the shift-number keys were referenced by a single word.  

# became "pound"
! became "bang"
$ became "dollar"
* became "star"

We never used two word names for symbols except open/close for paren, bracket, and brace.

# being called "hash" is a relatively new thing....
2
Bill BachPresident and Btrieve GuruCommented:
"Enter the extension of the person you wish to call, followed by the pound sign."  Clearly it is # in Chicago.
2
Atdhe NuhiuCommented:
Do people from the US think the word hashtag is a bit strange #shouldntitbepoundtag
0
AndyAinscowFreelance programmer / ConsultantCommented:
For me (English) the pound symbol is clearly £.  The # is a hash symbol.
1
mlmccCommented:
It depends on who I am talking to and the context of the conversation.  When the conversation is about monetary issues then POUND is the British monetary symbol.  If we are talking about weightier issues the POUND is # which is what I learned it as in my youth.
1
Paul JacksonSoftware EngineerCommented:
£ UK
1
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
It depends on who I am talking to and the context of the conversation.

There is no context!  You're over analyzing.  I walk up to you in the street and ask

"If I say "Pound Symbol", which "symbol" immediately comes to your mind?"

You answer?

Remember this is a G rated forum.  :)

Revised Tally Update!

£ = 18
# = 12
lb = 2
Not Sure (Nothing comes to mind) = 2

Where the votes have come from so far...

USA  13
Australia    3
Pakistan        1
Russia   1            
United Kingdom   3
Greece    1
New Zealand    2
Germany    4
Netherlands   1      
Ireland    1
India    1
France    1
Switzerland   1
Unknown   1
0
nobusCommented:
i see Netherlands  - but not Belgium?  how comes??
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
i see Netherlands  - but not Belgium?  how comes??

Gawd don't open that can of worms Nobus!  You're in with Germany.

I think I failed Geography at school LOL

Edit: Actually, Google came to the rescue.. Belgium will have its own category in the next update :)
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Do people from the US think the word hashtag is a bit strange #shouldntitbepoundtag

What a brilliant observation!  Haha :)
0
nobusCommented:
there's no lol in failing, Andrew..rofl
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Well Ma' n Pa' didn't go much for that book learnin stuff in my younger days ;)
0
bsodCommented:
Though I live in the US now, I'm born and raised Canadian and that's where I acquired my language. So make that two for Canada.

Tim and I will not be lumped in with Americans, eh?   ;-)
0
Brandon LyonSenior Frontend DeveloperCommented:
USA,
For me my first thought is pound as in weight, ie lbs.
If the context of the conversation were currency then I would know GBP (or other pounds).
It is rare that I would call # a pound sign. Usually it's called a hash around here. The only time I've heard it called a pound is related to a phone call.
1
Craig KehlerDirector of Customer Service & Community RelationsCommented:
I'm from the US, but spent time working in the UK in my early years.

I'm with the others who depend on context. The term "pound symbol" by itself leans me a little towards £, while the term "pound sign" or "pound key" would have me leaning towards #, but again context is everything.

If someone put a gun to my head and said "What is the pound symbol?" I'd listen very carefully to their accent before answering. :)

Personal pet peeve: When people speak the words "hashtag <some category>" as a way of labeling an entire conversation or comment.
1
Craig KehlerDirector of Customer Service & Community RelationsCommented:
Couldn't resist looking at the demographics in Google Trends. https://trends.google.com/trends/explore?q=pound%20symbol,pound%20sign
0
PatHartmanCommented:
Since you said "symbol", I would probably think of the UK money symbol but if you had said "sign", I would have thought of the octothorpe
2
Lucas BishopClick TrackerCommented:
From the US, where the "pound symbol" terminology was learned mostly due to voicemail. A large percentage of voice mail systems end the greeting with "To finish, press pound."

If you were to say "British Pound" then I'd visualize £
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
@Lucas - What if I just said "Pound Symbol" without any qualification?

What pops into your mind?
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
One final tally before I go catch a few hours of Zzz's

  • £ = 19
  • # = 12
  • lb = 3
  • Not Sure, Context or Nothing comes to mind = 3

Where the votes have come from ...

  • USA  16
  • Belgium  1
  • Australia    3
  • Pakistan        1
  • Russia   1            
  • United Kingdom   3
  • Greece    1
  • New Zealand    2
  • Germany    3
  • Netherlands   1      
  • Ireland    1
  • India    1
  • France    1
  • Switzerland   1
  • Unknown   1

Great response so far.

Please keep that data coming.
0
Lucas BishopClick TrackerCommented:
Sorry, I didn't include my actual answer in that first comment.

"Pound Symbol" is # for me.

Every single automated voice system uses that term over here in the US.

"Enter your choice then press pound"
"When you're finished, press pound"
etc.
1
Lucas BishopClick TrackerCommented:
OOC, in the UK, what do phone systems denote as the #?  Generally it's used to confirm your entry on a phone. Do they say "hash"?

ex., "Enter the last 4 digits of your account then press hash"
0
Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
I'm in Canada eh. :)

When doing anything around phones it's "#".

When doing anything on the Internet generally it's "£".

When I'm cooking, working on something automotive related (was a mechanic before IT), and such it's "lb". Canada converted to metric when I was somewhat young so half my brain is SAE and half is metric just like American cars were for close to 15-20 years! :)
1
Bryant SchaperCommented:
Lol, I think depends on context right, US based, I think # but if I was talking currency then, lol the other symbol.

Ok, I am just going to ask stupid question.  My keyboard, again US, doesnt even have the £ key, does the UK keyboard have it?  I would have to lookup the code.  So from an IT perspective and soley operating in the US, I guess I think #.
1
footechCommented:
# - USA
Growing up I heard # referred to as the pound key/button/sign on a telephone long before seeing it on a keyboard/typewriter.
1
Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
> Every single automated voice system uses that term over here in the US.
> "Enter your choice then press pound"

Those are the low-end systems. All of the high-end ones say:
"Enter your choice then press octothorpe"
0
footechCommented:
Everyone must use low-end systems then.
0
Bryant SchaperCommented:
Well when I hear "press the octotroph" I just mash the 0 until I get an operator or get hung up on.
0
tfewsterCommented:
> OOC, in the UK, what do phone systems denote as the #?  Generally it's used to confirm your entry on a phone. Do they say "hash"?
> ex., "Enter the last 4 digits of your account then press hash"

London calling...actually, I can't remember for sure. I'm on lots of conference calls, many to US based companies, so am used to pound=#. I don't have a £ on my phone keypad, so no confusion. But if someone says "pound", I think £.  

Related: What do you call #!  
(shebang, hashbang, poundbang, ???)
1
Craig KehlerDirector of Customer Service & Community RelationsCommented:
Ok, I am just going to ask stupid question.  My keyboard, again US, doesnt even have the £ key, does the UK keyboard have it?  I would have to lookup the code.  So from an IT perspective and soley operating in the US, I guess I think #.

You can enable international options by going into Control Panel->Language and selecting options. Then you have to add the United States-International keyboard and remove the default. Then you can use Shift+AltGr(right alt)+4 to make a £. :)

Edit to add: This assumes a windows computer.
0
Brandon LyonSenior Frontend DeveloperCommented:
@tfwester re: "Related: What do you call #!"

I call it CrunchBang, since that was the name of a linux distro which used #!. Depending on the context I also call it hashbang since that's what web developers call URLs with https : // domain.tld /#!/ url/.
0
Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
> Then you can use Shift+AltGr(right alt)+4 to make a £. :)

Or leave the US setting and just enter Alt-0163 on the numeric keypad:
£

I have that mapped to Alt-Ctrl-k (for the "k" in UK) in my AutoHotkey hotkeys script in my Startup group (so I don't have to remember Alt-0163, along with a gazillion other mappings):

!^k:: ;UK pound sterling (163/xA3)

Open in new window

Regards, Joe
0
Christopher RourkeProduct Manager @ Experts ExchangeCommented:
Location: US - California

  • "Pound Symbol" = #

Though I always heard it referred to as "pound sign" when I was growing up. I most heard it associated with navigating phone menus.
1
Christopher RourkeProduct Manager @ Experts ExchangeCommented:
I also recall finding out, via a trivia question a year or so ago, that the patent which outlines the functionality of the "#" on a touch-tone phone refers to it as an Octothorp.
1
Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
Well, now, thank you for that. :)
0
_agx_Commented:
#, USA

Though I've also heard octothorp occasionally, but that sounds very odd to my ear ;-)
1
Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
<In the zone>
Jet City Wooooomannnnn. Gotta find my way  home again
Jet City Wooooomannnnn. I see her face   every where I go

What??  Pound # Symbol?  What did the symbol do to deserve getting pounded?  #.   What would Robert Langdon say?   I'm already bored with this thread.  Let's talk about the Legends Football League.

Jet City Wooooomannnnn.  Just a thousand miles, and I'll be there
Jet City Wooooomannnnn.....
0
Chris LuttrellSenior Database ArchitectCommented:
Being in the US and on the older side, the # is what I think of when someone says "pound symbol".  I know in these modern social media days the "kids" say hashtag but it has always been the pound symbol to me.
1
it_saigeDeveloperCommented:
#OffTopicComment

Love that entire album.  Have it in my play list...  ;)

-saige-
0
Bryant SchaperCommented:
lol, that is a lot of typing to produce the '£'.  That would suck to have to type that instead of $ each time.

England should just change their currency symbol or L and be done with it.
0
DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)Database Architect / Systems AnalystCommented:
#
USA
2
Doug WaltonDatabase AdministratorCommented:
From the US, California.

# = pound symbol

This is a pound sign:
pound sign
5

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tfewsterCommented:
@Bryant Schaper
> lol, that is a lot of typing to produce the '£'

Yeah, having to press shift and 3 on a proper (i.e. UK) keyboard is just so difficult
UK-KB
0
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
lol, that is a lot of typing to produce the '£'.  That would suck to have to type that instead of $ each time.

England should just change their currency symbol or L and be done with it.

change it to S[hit]
0
Brandon LyonSenior Frontend DeveloperCommented:
I decided to look up the meaning of the word "pound" as it relates to currency. Historically it meant a literal pound (weight) of silver. I guess in that regard my first instinct wasn't wrong.
0
Nichole LaRueMarketing OperationsCommented:
# USA. We've been conditioned to hit the pound sign to bypass to an operator.
1
AlanConsultantCommented:
£

New Zealand


Interesting that American's call a hash sign a pound sign.

I assume that means that American's don't refer to 'hash tags' but to 'pound tags', or do you have another name altogether?


In terms of typing - I believe that UK keyboards have a £ symbol, instead of something else (maybe the hash symbol which isn't really used very often anyway)?


Alan.
1
Nichole LaRueMarketing OperationsCommented:
@alan^ We def call it hash tag for social. Pound tag sounds silly, but I'm going to start trollin' my friends with it.
0
IanStatisticianCommented:
£

New Zealand's west Island (AUS)
3
AlanConsultantCommented:
I  just read the entire thread (after posting above), and saw the picture of the UK keyboard, so it appears that the hash is replaced by pound there (shift-3).

Someone asked about phones:  In NZ, the norm would be for a phone system to say something like,

Enter your PIN then press the hash key.

If it said to press 'pound' I suspect most people would have no idea what to do, and would likely 'pound' the keys or just keep pressing zero, and hope to get a human.


Alan.
0
Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
> Interesting that American's call ...

Excellent candidate for a submission to Apostrophe Catastrophes.

> means that American's don't ...

Good to know that the first one wasn't a typo.

> refer to 'hash tags' but to 'pound tags'

Of course not. Just because two words are interchangeable in one context — in this case, "hash sign" and "pound sign" for the # character — does not mean that they are interchangeable in other contexts — such as "hash tag" and "pound tag". For example, "boot space" and "trunk space" are interchangeable in the UK and US when talking about cars, but when I talk about the "boot drive" on my PC, I don't think that my friends across the pond will be talking about the "trunk drive" on their computers.
1
Lucas BishopClick TrackerCommented:
Related: What do you call #!  
Pound Bang. Back when I was working with shell scripts, social media was dominated by Tom and hashtags didn't exist. I didn't even start correlating #-to-hash until sometime in the past decade.

Here's my personal evolution of names for the # symbol:

Childhood = number sign
Young Adult = pound sign
Adulthood  = hash

When I see the £ symbol today, I think "British Pound" or "GBP". I've never looked at it and thought "pound sign/symbol".
0
Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
> If it said to press 'pound' I suspect most people would have no idea what to do

Yes, that's why Andrew asked for "part of the world" in the question. I suspect that nearly everyone in the US would know exactly what to do.
0
AlanConsultantCommented:
Hi Joe,

Good catch on the apostrophes.

On your second point, you seem to imply that the hash symbol has two different names in America, which is interesting.

Of course the area is quite large, and incorporates multiple states, so it might be that things are different outside of your own provincial area?  For example, North Dakota and South Dakota might be different, or Mexico and New Mexico.


Alan.
0
Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
> seem to imply that the hash symbol has two different names in America, which is interesting

To be clear, I think that the # character/symbol is recognized with the name "pound sign" by most Americans, but would also be recognized by many, if not most, Americans with the name "hash" (or "hash sign"). So, yes, to that extent, it's fair to say that the # character/symbol "has two different names in America". But I'm still rooting for octothorpe. :)

> Of course the area is quite large, and incorporates multiple states, so it might be that things are different outside of your own provincial area?

Not that different! :)

> For example, North Dakota and South Dakota might be different

Nah, pretty much the same. :)

> or Mexico and New Mexico

Careful on that one! I don't think that our current administration would be pleased to hear you call Mexico a state, although it could save us a ton of money on the wall.
0
Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
pound sign or number sign = #
pound symbol isn't in my vocabulary exactly but I might well think = £
US
1
Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
> pound sign or number sign = #
> pound symbol isn't in my vocabulary exactly but I might well think = £

Exactly! Which is why the phrasing of questions in polls/surveys can have a huge impact on the results. As I mentioned in an earlier thread, I suspect the voting would be different if the Title were "The great Pound Sign Vote" and the question were:

If I say "Pound Sign", what character/symbol immediately comes to your mind?

But, hey, as Andrew said, this is just for fun...even though four tickets and an all-expenses-paid trip to the #Superbowl are on the line.
0
Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
>even though four tickets and an all-expenses-paid trip to the #Superbowl are on the line.
Dear World - Please don't freeze your butt off and die while attending the Super Bowl, as it makes us Minnesotans look bad.  And since I'm about fifteen miles southwest of the Vikings stadium where it's at I'll hear all the gory details.  Thanks in advance.  Love Jimbo
0
Gerald ConnollyCommented:
From a Brit living in Australia

# = Hash (but i am aware that the Yanks call it a Pound symbol)
£ = Pound (as in GBP)
lb = pound weight

Interestingly the standard KB here in Australia has # as Shift-3, rather than £ and also has the @ and " transposed (ie @ is Shift-2)
1
Terry WoodsIT GuruCommented:
# = Hash
£ = Pound
1
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
A thousand thanks for everyone's participation so far.  This is generating some highly interesting statistics!

Latest Tally Update!

  • £ = 23
  • # = 23
  • lb = 3
  • Not Sure, Context or Nothing comes to mind = 4

Where the votes are coming from ...

  • USA  24
  • Canada   3
  • Belgium  1
  • Australia    5
  • Pakistan        1
  • Russia   1            
  • United Kingdom   4
  • Greece    1
  • New Zealand    4
  • Germany    3
  • Netherlands   1      
  • Ireland    1
  • India    1
  • France    1
  • Switzerland   1
  • Unknown   1

Have you visited before but haven't contributed yet?   Then please do so, I need your input!!

Keep those votes coming folks :)
1
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
I'm in Canada eh. :)
Australia here - The beachfront capital of the world ay!

Those are the low-end systems. All of the high-end ones say:
"Enter your choice then press octothorpe"
ROFL  !!  Actually, in Australia (which by the way is a day ahead of most) we say "press Hash" Still waiting for the rest of the world to catch up :)

I suspect that nearly everyone in the US would know exactly what to do.
While the rest of the world sat scratching their heads lol...

even though four tickets and an all-expenses-paid trip to the #Superbowl are on the line.
:^)

*Tosses another log on the fire*
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Hey all this talk about football made me remember a great Sylvester Stalone film...

Stallone:  "I'll take football"
Arab:  "Football? What is this? You play it with your foot??"
Stallone:  "Not really"  (Mounts horse)

Who knows which film the above dialogue came from?  :)
0
Luke ElArchery Coach/Instructor and Bow TechnicianCommented:
I'm from Aus and '#' is the first thing that comes to mind, although I call '#' the 'Hash' symbol and '£' the 'Pound' symbol. Pretty much everybody over 30 I've met means '#' when they say 'Pound' for some reason, but thanks to "Star-Ten-Hash" (*10#) I call '#' 'Hash'!
1
Tanya GoncalvesCommented:
£, Australia
2
Caleb TrimbleAudio-Visual TechnicianCommented:
£ 🇦🇺
1
tfewsterCommented:
I've just rechecked, and actually listened to the prompts for the first time:
Dial the UK access number for our corporate phone system
- UK colleague who set up the US access number says "Press hash to access a conference bridge"
Select the US conference bridge
- An English accent says "Enter your conference number and press pound"
2
tfewsterCommented:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_and_American_keyboards
There are two major English language computer keyboard layouts, the United States layout and the United Kingdom layout defined in BS 4822[1] (48-key version). Both are QWERTY layouts. Users in the United States do not frequently need to make use of the £ (pound) and € (euro) currency symbols, which are common needs in the United Kingdom and Ireland, although the $ (dollar sign) symbol is also provided as standard on UK and Irish keyboards. In Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Poland and India, the US keyboard might also be used.
(obviously German, French etc. keyboards don't need £ either)

So pound=£ is an unlikely association for most of the world, as they don't often see or hear it.
Though that doesn't explain why # is called "pound", a 2-syllable word, by many people:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number_sign
0
Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
Andrew Leinart - Before I forget to mention it my compliments on getting 261 comments on a question about symbols.  Nicely played.  This thread is as surprisingly entertaining as my hometown Facebook's tenth annual 'When will this snowpile melt?' contest.
1
David L. HansenProgrammer AnalystCommented:
#!! All the way.

What the heck is a £ sign? ;)
Oh, it looks like a hammer head smacking something, I see now.

€ sign is the symbol for E.T. correct? C'mon, you must see it (side view)!  "Phone home."

;)
David
1
NEnterprise Systems EngineerCommented:
It would have to be £ for me.  From the UK.
1
_agx_Commented:
>> # being called "hash" is a relatively new thing....

In the US, yes.  For some old folks like me, "Hash" used to have a very different meaning way back when ;-)
1
Kyle AbrahamsSenior .Net DeveloperCommented:
A "youngin" by most standards, # is still the "pound of choice" for me.  I second agx in saying hash is something one consumes, lol.

Proposing a new name for the  £ . . . the Dolluk (Dollar (-ar) + (uk)).  Thoughts?
3
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Andrew Leinart - Before I forget to mention it my compliments on getting 261 comments on a question about symbols.  Nicely played.

Thanks Jim. It wasn't started for that purpose. lol..  I'm both surprised (and very pleased) with the data I'm getting, though it's not going the way I predicted it might. I had no idea so many people would think of # as a Pound Symbol.

I just shared the question on Social Media and LinkedIn last night, so hopefully we'll get a new influx of data soon.  I plan on leaving this open for another 2 or 3 days :)

This thread is as surprisingly entertaining as my hometown Facebook's tenth annual 'When will this snowpile melt?' contest.

LOL !  C'mon, aren't you even the slightest bit interested in the results? :)

Revised Tally Update!

  • £ = 25
  • # = 26
  • lb = 3
  • Not Sure, Context or Nothing comes to mind = 4

Where the votes are coming from ...


  • USA  26
  • Canada   3
  • Belgium  1
  • Australia    7
  • Pakistan        1
  • Russia   1            
  • United Kingdom   5
  • Greece    1
  • New Zealand    4
  • Germany    3
  • Netherlands   1      
  • Ireland    1
  • India    1
  • France    1
  • Switzerland   1
  • Unknown   1

Haven't put in a comment yet?  Please do so, we need your input!

Thanks again to all those who have made a comment so far!
0
David L. HansenProgrammer AnalystCommented:
So as to keep your data pure, let me add that I'm from the US.
0
Kyle AbrahamsSenior .Net DeveloperCommented:
Ditto - US as well.
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Thanks for clarifying your country David and Kyle. I already got that info from both your profiles so the data should still be up to scratch :)

Best...

Andrew
0
skullnobrainsCommented:
£ immediate obvious answer
# as well
lb did not strike me as a symbol ( which is debatable )
voted from france

btw most of the french would not associate £ to a pound unless it is a "sterling", and had no idea how to refer to # in english before twitter so they'd either use hashtag if they watch a lot of tv shows and probably don't know or care otherwise, ... they probably would understand hash quicker than pound if they receive instructions on their phones but might understand neither without context. they all know of pound as a weight measure ( which we actually use from time to time, mainly for cooking ) though many don't know "lb" for it's sign
1
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
<<LOL !  C'mon, aren't you even the slightest bit interested in the results? :)>>

  Sorry, but no, not really.  

  As pointed out early on, the answers you are receiving are based on many factors, which seem to boil down to two; where you live and how old you are.  But  since your not taking a valid survey, the results are pretty much meaningless.

Jim.
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Sorry, but no, not really.

Ah well... different strokes for different folks eh? :)

But  since your not taking a valid survey, the results are pretty much meaningless.

Not to me. As community input, they will be quite useful in satisfying my curiosity on the topic.

Thanks for your feedback.
2
andyalderCommented:
If you asked about pound *sign* then from UK I would say £, but rarely hear that called pound symbol.
1
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Latest Tally Update!

  • £ = 27
  • # = 26
  • lb = 3
  • Not Sure, Context or Nothing comes to mind = 4

Where members are voting from ...

  • USA  26
  • Canada   3
  • Belgium  1
  • Australia    7
  • Pakistan        1
  • Russia   1            
  • United Kingdom   5
  • Greece    1
  • New Zealand    4
  • Germany    3
  • Netherlands   2      
  • Ireland    1
  • India    1
  • France    2
  • Switzerland   1
  • Unknown   1

Haven't given your opinion as yet?  

I plan on closing this question around about ~ midnight on Sunday 4th Feb 2018.  (Australian Time)

Please do add your comment / opinion before then.

Thanks :)
0
Ben Personick (Previously QCubed)Lead Network EngineerCommented:
# - United States

Strangely enough, based on the title of your question I thought of the British Pound symbol.

However, based on the text of your question I thought of the number sign, which is colloquially referred to as the pound sign by the phone companies, and therefore has worked its way into that meaning through all walks of life.  I wonder if you had simply asked what do you call this symbol "#" (List all in order of likelihood" how it would shake out now that Hashtag is a thing.
2
nobusCommented:
in flemish its called "hekje" - meaning fence
1
Ben Personick (Previously QCubed)Lead Network EngineerCommented:
Also, I think Sign/Symbol plays into this Q.

Pound Sign seems more likely to evoke # than Pound Symbol, especially when reading "The Great Pound Symbol" when you put great in front of Pound then I think Great Brittish Pounds sterling, that seems to be why the title and the text evoked a different response in my mind.

Thanks,

Ben
0
_agx_Commented:
> I wonder if you had simply asked what do you call this symbol "#" (List all in order of likelihood" how it would shake out now that Hashtag is a thing.

Yeah, probably a lot more "tag" responses. Though after years of listening to US phone prompts it's still a "pound sign" or "number symbol" to me.  This guy had some interesting theories on possible origins of "hash", "pound" and "number symbol".
https://www.quora.com/Why-has-the-symbol-been-called-a-number-sign-pound-sign-and-now-hashtag
1
Anthea WynnCommented:
£ - it has been ever thus. Well, if not ever, at least 500 years in the UK. History will out when we mere mortals are gone and forgotten.

# - an American abbreviation for number.

Does the confusion arise because the # and £ are on the same keyboard key (the number 3) but it depends on which keyboard configuration you are using as to which symbol you get? Just a thought.

I am from Australia
1
Ben Personick (Previously QCubed)Lead Network EngineerCommented:
# - an American abbreviation for number.

# Is actually an ancient map-making abreviation for a village (A central square with 8 fields around it, found on maps in england france etc.

It's got some other really more specific name, and these other meanings are just what we're calling it in certain usages in more recent times (So it seems) however # isn;t an "American" symbol (as much as I'd be happy to take credit for it ;) :)
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
# Is actually an ancient map-making abreviation for a village (A central square with 8 fields around it, found on maps in england france etc.

Great comment Ben. I had no idea that's where # originated from. This thread has become a wealth of information on the pound and hash symbols for me! I'd never seen a UK based keyboard before tfewster posted this comment as well :)

New Tally Update!

£ = 28
# = 27
lb = 3
Not Sure, Context or Nothing comes to mind = 4

Where the votes are coming from ...

USA  27
Canada   3
Belgium  1
Australia    8
Pakistan        1
Russia   1            
United Kingdom   5
Greece    1
New Zealand    4
Germany    3
Netherlands   2      
Ireland    1
India    1
France    2
Switzerland   1
Unknown   1

Thanks to everyone who's put in their comment!

Haven't added your input yet? Please do so now :)

Thanks...
0
Anthea WynnCommented:
A UK keyboard is physically the same as Australia but you can set it up to be whichever you want.
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
I thought so too Anthea, but look at this post...

https://www.experts-exchange.com/questions/29080864/The-great-Pound-Symbol-Vote.html#a42450721

That suggests to me that Shift 3 on a UK keyboard has the £ symbol on it.  

UK Keyboard from Google Image Search

UK Keyboard Pic
Or are you saying that UK keyboards also just have a # on the number 3 key like US-based keyboards?

I know that you can remap the keys on any keyboard to display whatever symbol you want in Windows :)
0
Craig KehlerDirector of Customer Service & Community RelationsCommented:
Found an interesting game development company that is related to this thread http://www.octothorpe.com/ :)
1
AlanConsultantCommented:
Hi,

I just pulled out an old UK keyboard to have a look.

UK keyboards (presumably by default), have a pound symbol on the number three key (shift-3) whereas NZ and (therefore, I would guess probably) Aussie keyboards have a dollar symbol.

Given its age (more than ten years old, probably older), I am wondering if newer UK keyboards may have a Euro symbol on them somewhere too, since it would seem likely they need to type that character quite often too?


Alan.


Edit:  I just noticed that there is another symbol on the '4' key on the picture above - is that a Euro?  If so, how do you get that instead of a dollar symbol?
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Found an interesting game development company that is related to this thread
Haha.. Love it!  :)

UK keyboards (presumably by default), have a pound symbol on the number three key (shift-3) whereas NZ and (therefore, I would guess probably) Aussie keyboards have a dollar symbol.

I'm on an Aussie keyboard as I type Alan.  Shift+3 = #  While Shift+4 = $  Shift 4 is the dollar symbol and how we represent our currency,

I just noticed that there is another symbol on the '4' key on the picture above - is that a Euro?  If so, how do you get that instead of a dollar symbol?

It is indeed a dollar symbol on the pic above.  I've no idea what that other little symbol beside the 4 is though.
0
AlanConsultantCommented:
Sorry, I mistyped:

NZ and Aussie keyboards are the same - Shift 3 is hash and shift 4 is dollar symbol.

Still interested to know if the other symbol on the UK keyboard is a Euro symbol.

Alan
0
Gerald ConnollyCommented:
Certainly looks like a Euro symbol

According to Wikipedia, there are two main standard keyboard layouts - US & UK
Windows keyboards
The UK variant of the IBM Enhanced keyboard commonly used with personal computers designed for Microsoft Windows differs from the US layout as follows:
•      The UK keyboard has 1 more key than the U.S. keyboard (UK=62, US=61, on the typewriter keys)
•      The Alt key to the right of the space bar is replaced by an AltGr key
•      The # symbol is replaced by the £ symbol and a 102nd key is added next to the Enter key to accommodate the displaced #
•      € is produced by AltGr + 4
•      @ and " are swapped
•      the ~ is moved to the # key, and is replaced by a ¬ symbol on the backquote (`) key; AltGr + backquote produces ¦
•      the key labelled "|" usually produces the "¦" symbol whilst the one labelled "¦" usually produces the "|" symbol
•      the \ key is moved to the left of the Z key
•      the Enter key spans two rows, and is narrower to accommodate the # key
•      Some UK keyboards do not label Backspace, Enter, Tab and Shift in words
On laptop computers, the | and \ key is often placed next to the space bar.
US-UK Keyboards
1
Connor MackinnonCommented:
If you're asking me for money, it'll be £ but if you were to ask me for phone related usage (I'm not sure if there's any other usage for it) it would be #
1
Wayne Taylor (webtubbs)Commented:
From Aus - If someone asked me to type the pound symbol, I would go straight to the character map and find £. I've never heard of # being called a pound symbol.
2
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Certainly looks like a Euro symbol

Agreed. Can see it much clearer on the screenshots you posted Gerald.

the \ key is moved to the left of the Z key

Reminds me of some of the telephone support calls I've done. I tell people to put a "backslash" and they go and put a forward / slash instead lol

Nice post! :)
0
andyalderCommented:
The € symbol on a UK kbd is generated by holding <alt gr> and pressing 4.
áéíóú accented keys also generated bu holding altgr,

Reminds me of some old card where the manual said hold alt and press R (or similar) but it didn't work in UK as it was altgr that had to be pressed over here.
0
Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:
[apologies]
This should settle the argument of "what is a hash tag" once and for all....

hashtag-funny-whats-a-hashtag.jpg
[/apologies]
2
Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
Kent - Thank you for placing that image in my brain as it will haunt me throughout the day.  Especially this evening when I'm refereeing three youth hockey games in a row.
0
Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:
JIm -- You're just lucky that it doesn't play "It's a Small World After All"...  ;)
0
Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
I tell my friends that refereeing youth hockey is a lot like taking my dog to the dog park:
  • Lots of small fast moving objects
  • They usually go around you but you'll still want to brace for impact
  • Lots of impulse and reaction
  • They both don't listen all that well.
  • Most dogs/kids aren't too loud but their owners/coaches are
  • If they don't complain (whimper) then they're probably just playing
  • If they get too out of control they're pretty easy to throw in the box.
  • Neither can tell you if a pound sign is # or that squiggly L thing
3
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Final Tally in the next comment!
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
And the winner is...  

The Pound Symbol
Final Tally!

  • £ = 29
  • # = 27
  • lb = 3
  • Not Sure, Context or Nothing comes to mind = 5

Where the votes came from...

  • USA  27
  • Canada   3
  • Belgium  1
  • Australia    9
  • Pakistan        1
  • Russia   1            
  • United Kingdom   5
  • Greece    1
  • New Zealand    4
  • Germany    3
  • Netherlands   2      
  • Ireland    1
  • India    1
  • France    2
  • Switzerland   1
  • Unknown   2

The best answer went to EE member, Doug Walton, for the most endorsed comment in the thread.

Thanks to everyone who participated in indulging me on this fun little experiment, as well as for all of your great comments. I predicted a landslide win for the pound symbol/sign but not so - it came pretty close. We learn something new every day.

Points have been distributed as evenly as possible, with Doug getting a small (leftover) bonus for all the endorsements he scored :)

Thanks again everyone!
3
andyalderCommented:
> I predicted a landslide win for the pound symbol

It was 100% win for pound symbol because we all answered "If I say "Pound Symbol", which "symbol" immediately comes to your mind?" with what we consider to be the pound symbol :)
0
bsodCommented:
>> I predicted a landslide win for the pound symbol/sign

uhhhh... which one?   ;-)
2
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
Heh.. for the record, to me, a Pound Symbol has always been a £

:)
1
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
> I predicted a landslide win for the pound symbol

But you really don’t know,  you still could be right.   Until you determine a population and sample size,  your margin of error can be huge.

If you polled another 100 people for example,  they might all answer pound symbol.

That’s what I meant with my earlier comment.

Until you survey enough people, you really can’t draw any conclusions.

It was interesting though to see the bias based on location and age.
1
Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
#NotMyPoundSign
3
Craig KehlerDirector of Customer Service & Community RelationsCommented:
Fitting everyone got 42 points. The answer to the ultimate question of life, the universe and everything, according to Douglas Adams. :)
4
Ben Personick (Previously QCubed)Lead Network EngineerCommented:
I had the same thought craig :)
1
David L. HansenProgrammer AnalystCommented:
Craig brings up a significant point about 42...guess what's about to ride into space to orbit the Sun this afternoon?
0
andyalderCommented:
I don't know but it certainly won't be a David Bowie CD.
1
David L. HansenProgrammer AnalystCommented:
That Tesla roadster isn't empty. It's heavily influenced by Douglas Adams. :)
0
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
110 minutes to FH1!

Jim.
1
David L. HansenProgrammer AnalystCommented:
Apologies Andrew...Craig's "42" took me on a tangent and I've hijacked your thread.
0
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
No probs David, hijack away. I'm actually enjoying the comments lol ;)
0
David L. HansenProgrammer AnalystCommented:
Anyone have a list of items in the roadster besides the Hitchhiker book and the towel (those were the only items I heard about, oh and Starman the driver of course...boy is he in for a long road trip).
1
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
There is a model of the car, starman, and a storage device with Asimov's Foundation Trilogy.

 A circuit board in the Roadster carries the note "*Made on Earth by humans*"

and a tile with 6,000 Space X employee signatures on it.

I'm sure there's probably more<g>

Jim.
2
David L. HansenProgrammer AnalystCommented:
For those who are interested, Starman Live (Youtube channel) currently has over 1 Million subscribers.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aBr2kKAHN6M
1
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
This is just freak'n awesome:

Roadster1.jpg
Roadster2.jpg
There is a man who knows how to do a PR campaign.

Jim.
3
Andrew LeniartSenior EditorAuthor Commented:
For those who are interested, Starman Live (Youtube channel) currently has over 1 Million subscribers.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aBr2kKAHN6M

Cool. I'll take a look at that when I have a couple of spare hours. Thanks :)

This is just freak'n awesome

Nice. This thread has turned out to be a wealth of heads-up type comments and of enlightening information. lol
1
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