keeping the same domain name and serve name

I am replacing existing SBS2011 Server with Windows 2016 Serve and I like to keep the same domain name and file server name when I set up a new server in the same network.
Since I like to use the same file server name like "DC1" and same domain name "company.local", I am going to keep new Windows 2016 server box out of current network until I am ready to join existing workstation PCs to the new domain controller.

I know I need to dis-join all network PCs from current domain controller before joining them to the new domain controller.
Currently I see,In each user C drive, C:\Users\Username or in some PCs, I see two - C:\Users\Username and C:\Users\Username.domain.
As I dis-join these PCs and join them to the new domain controller with same domain name and same server name, would each computer created a new user folder name in C:\Users\Username.??? or try to use existing folder names like C:\Users\Username or C:\Users\Username.domain?

Are there any pitfalls that come with keeping the same domain name and server name when setting up a new domain controller?
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sgleeAsked:
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masnrockCommented:
As I dis-join these PCs and join them to the new domain controller with same domain name and same server name, would each computer created a new user folder name in C:\Users\Username.??? or try to use existing folder names like C:\Users\Username or C:\Users\Username.domain?
I believe the latter would apply. Even though it's a domain with the same name, it's not the same domain.

Are there any pitfalls that come with keeping the same domain name and server name when setting up a new domain controller?
Aside from the profile thing, not really. However, for the sake of troubleshooting, it might confuse someone a bit.
Hypercat (Deb)Commented:
The biggest pitfall I can see is that you'll have to recreate your Active Directory manually on the new server.  There's a certain amount of work involved in recreating the domain, AD settings you'd have to duplicate, etc.  If you have a very small domain, this isn't such a big deal, but if you have even 20 or 30 users, it's somewhat of a chore.  I'm not sure why you particularly want to keep the same server name, but if you choose to do a migration from the SBS2011 to the new server, you'd still be preserving the same domain name, but your life will be much less complicated since you don't have to recreate user accounts or manually unjoin and rejoin computers to the domain.
masnrockCommented:
I am replacing existing SBS2011 Server with Windows 2016 Serve and I like to keep the same domain name and file server name when I set up a new server in the same network.
Also bear in mind that you won't be able to have both servers online at the same time.

But as Hypercat mentioned, a migration would've made more sense unless there's a problem with the existing AD that has you wanting to start fresh.
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Hypercat (Deb)Commented:
Here's an article if you're interested in looking into the migration process instead:

https://www.itpromentor.com/sbs-ad-mig/
Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
If I understand things correctly:

OLD: SBS.Domain.Local (existing AD)

NEW: SBS.Domain.Local (fresh AD)

This is a very bad idea. At the very least change the TLD. Register a domain for it or use .LAN.

Why?

Group Policy Tattoos.

Everything "looks" good on the new domain, but Group Policy operates at the GUID level not the name level. Same domain means new GUIDs. It will confuse the domain joined machines.

BTDT. It's painful.

Alternative way is to use Jeff Middleton's SwingIT SBSMigration.com method.
sgleeAuthor Commented:
It appears that using the same domain name and using same computer name as domain controller is not recommended.
Then can I create a new Windows 2016 server based domain controller with different domain name while existing sbs2011 is running on the same network?
masnrockCommented:
Yes.
Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
Yes, run them side-by-side. Just keep in mind where the IP addresses are relative to the current setup.

We set up a new domain for side-by-side and make sure all new server VMs have their DNS0/1 pointing to the new DC(s).

ForensiT Profile Migration Wizard can be helpful too. It can automagically move Pretty Kitty and everything else when cut-over time comes.

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sgleeAuthor Commented:
It is good to hear that I can create and run new domain controller while SBS2011 is on the same network. Then I can create users and network printers on the new DC and copy user files and folders from SBS in advance. When I am ready to switch over, I can simply copy newly/changed files and folders only using ROBOCOPY.

Currently SBS has 192.168.1.9 and backup DC is 192.168.1.3. Can I assign a temporary IP address to new DC like 192.168.1.50 and change it 192.168.1.9 once I shut down SBS?
Or I am not allowed to change IP address once I promote the new server as DC?
masnrockCommented:
Can I assign a temporary IP address to new DC like 192.168.1.50 and change it 192.168.1.9 once I shut down SBS?
Changing the IP address is okay to do. But bear in mind you will need to update the address on the systems connected to the domain by then too.
Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
Change the DC's IP then run in an elevated CMD:

IPConfig /RegisterDNS

If there are any other DCs set up then the info may take a bit to reach them.
sgleeAuthor Commented:
@Philip

"ForensiT Profile Migration Wizard" --> Can you explain to me again how this can help me save time during migration?
At the time of cut-over, obviously I need to dis-joint workstations & member server computers from SBS2011. After turning off SBS2011, I need to join workstations & member servers to the new Windows 2016 Domain Controller and it will create a new user profile on every computer like C:\users\SteveJobs.NewDomain. Are you saying that I can use ForensiT Profile Migration Wizard to copy profile in C:\users\SteveJobs.OldDomain?
Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
With a bit of configuration, users log on to the old domain and ProfWiz runs. Once it completes they are on the new domain and their existing local profile is migrated over.

We've used it for Netware to Windows and Windows to Windows migration. For the most part, it just works.

DNS pointers would be needed for the new domain on SBS.
PberSolutions ArchitectCommented:
No comment has been added to this question in more than 21 days, so it is now classified as abandoned.

I have recommended this question be closed as follows:

Split:
-- Philip Elder (https:#a42457311)
-- Hypercat (Deb) (https:#a42452146)
-- masnrock (https:#a42452143)


If you feel this question should be closed differently, post an objection and the moderators will review all objections and close it as they feel fit. If no one objects, this question will be closed automatically the way described above.

Pber
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