vSphere 6.x Web Client Topology Diagram Symbols: How To Interpret Connectivity?

Points of My Scenario
1. I am unable to find documentation explaining the meaning of the different connectivity symbols & colors used in vSphere 6.x Topology diagrams found in the vSphere 6.x Web Client.
REQUEST: Please provide a URL that explains the meaning of different connectivity symbols & colors seen in the vSphere 6.x Web Client Topology diagrams (see attached PNG file for example).
vSphere_Topology_Diagram.png
waltforbesSenior IT SpecialistAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
1. In "Example 1" of my PNG, all VMs show the green 'live' status, but the "vmnic1" on the right shows white: doesn't this mean that the physical NIC is disconnected? And if so, how can the VMs be "live"?

White is supposed to mean disconnected or down, if the VMs have valid networking, and traffic passes, then the Web Client is out of date, bug, try refresh!


2. In "Example 2" of the PNG, the VM Suse Linux 10 is selected and shows a bold orange marked path to three "live" (green) vmnics on a single host: does this mean that the VM Suse Linux 10 is sending traffic across 3 physical links concurrently?

Not really, the VM is using any of those uplinks.

3. What do the green triangles (green, right-pointing arrowheads next to the information symbols) on the left side of the switch mean (see Examples 1 & 2)?

VM is powered ON!

4. I notice that the vMotion portgroup does not have such an arrowhead - even though it has a 'green  live blob' like its sibling portgroups: how come (i.e. what is the significance of such a difference)?

it has no VMs using the virtual machine portgroup, because it's a HOST only VMKernel Portgroup for VMKernel HOST Traffic!
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Basically, the grey blocks are virtual switches, the equivalent of physical switches, which have network ports.

These virtual network ports are connected to the virtual machine (indicated by the green live blob), these are on the left of the vSwitch

These are grouped into named Virtual Machine Portgroups, e.g. vMotion, Production etc

on the right of the vSwitch, these portgroups are connected to uplinks in the host (green indicates they are live)

All Web Client documentation is here for 6.5 as it used the Web Client only

https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vSphere/5.5/com.vmware.vsphere.networking.doc/GUID-35B40B0B-0C13-43B2-BC85-18C9C91BE2D4.html

Just to add VMware has been criticized at poor documentation. Hence why I write so many VMware articles!

see here

https://www.myvirtualjourney.com/vsphere-6-0-how-to-create-vsphere-standard-switch-part-2/
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waltforbesSenior IT SpecialistAuthor Commented:
Dear Andrew, your explanation is a great start; I am grateful. Here are my confusions:
1. In "Example 1" of my PNG, all VMs show the green 'live' status, but the "vmnic1" on the right shows white: doesn't this mean that the physical NIC is disconnected? And if so, how can the VMs be "live"?

2. In "Example 2" of the PNG, the VM Suse Linux 10 is selected and shows a bold orange marked path to three "live" (green) vmnics on a single host: does this mean that the VM Suse Linux 10 is sending traffic across 3 physical links concurrently?

3. What do the green triangles (green, right-pointing arrowheads next to the information symbols) on the left side of the switch mean (see Examples 1 & 2)?

4. I notice that the vMotion portgroup does not have such an arrowhead - even though it has a 'green  live blob' like its sibling portgroups: how come (i.e. what is the significance of such a difference)?

I believe that answers to the above 4 confusions (along with your first set of answers) will enable me to interpret any other vSphere web client topology diagram I would come across.

I am grateful for any input. Thank you plenty thus far.
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waltforbesSenior IT SpecialistAuthor Commented:
Andrew, you have fully enlightened me on this topic...I do see the light!
I am grateful for all your insights; thank you!
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