NIC teaming on hyper-v host or within each VM?

I installed Windows Server 2016 Datacenter on a Dell T620, and then I installed the Hyper-V Role. Next, I created a NIC Team comprised of 2 physical 1Gbps network adapters. Team is called LANTeam. Settings are: Teaming Mode - Switch Independent, Load Balancing Mode - Dynamic, Standby Adapter - None (all adapters active)

In this server's Network Connections control panel, I see all of my physical NICs, and I also now see one more connection called 'LANTeam'. That is the name of the connection but the Device Name is 'Microsoft Network Adapter Multiplexor Driver'

If I double-click on this network connection, it shows a speed of 2.0 Gbps which makes sense since this is 2 x 1 Gbps connections, teamed together.

Here's where things get a little cloudy for me:

I open Hyper-V Manager and click on Virtual Switch Manager. I create a new Virtual Switch (External) and select 'Microsoft Network Adapter Multiplexor Driver' from the drop-down list.

I name this switch 'LAN vSwitch'

Next, I create my first VM. In its Properties window I select 'LAN vSwitch' from the drop-down.

When I start this VM (I installed Windows 2016 Server), go to Network Connections and double-click on the one (and only) Network Adapter (which is just called 'Ethernet', it shows the speed is only 1.0Gbps.

Why not 2.0Gbps? My goal is to create a few VMs, all having a 2.0Gbps Ethernet connection.
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ecarboneAsked:
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
In many cases  you won't get 2 gigs from a single OS no matter what you do. Multiple VMs will get 1Gig because the team can load Bala certain the connections.  But the nature of Ethernet means remote machines will have a single Mac address associated with a VM and so inbound traffic will only hit one NIC. And therefore be limited to 1Gb/s.

You have to start really digging into specialty switch configurations to squeeze out more. And with 1gig NICs  usually isn't worth it.

The benefits of teaming is the redundancy and smarter load balancing when multiple VMs are involved. Don't team in the guest and don't sweat that a VM is limited to a gig. If it really needs more then invest in faster physical NICs. With 40 and even 100Gb technologies out there the cost of, 10G has dropped enough that good LACP switches and labor in maintaining and managing custom teams is usually more expensive than an upgrade.

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ecarboneAuthor Commented:
What I am trying to do is find the biggest pipe to transfer files when converting VMware to Hyper-V. Seems my bottleneck is when the conversion utilities copy the file across the network. I guess my next research project will be faster NICs. Thanks again for your help Cliff.
Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
I have two very thorough EE articles on all things Hyper-V:

Some Hyper-V Hardware and Software Best Practices
Practical Hyper-V Performance Expectations
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Windows Server 2016

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