Need a Managed Switch to filter out SIP/ALG

A client has a VOIP phone system, and a Comcast gateway. On the gateway, one cannot turn off  SIP/ALG, which makes the VOIP  calls inconsistent.  They have an unmanaged switch now that cannot be programmed to remove the SIP/ALG disturbance.  What I need to a 24 port gigabit switch that can be programmed to remove this SIP/ALG  setting and produce VLANS to segment the phone and other traffic.

I'm wondering budget-wise whether the Netgear JGS524E would allow me to turn off SIP/ALG as well as create the necessary VLANS.  If not, can you recommend one?
Mark LitinOwnerAsked:
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masnrockConnect With a Mentor Commented:
If I remember right, none of the Comcast gateways let you disable SIP ALG. Given how SIP ALG works, you're going to have to have a router or firewall that supports disabling it. I would recommend for you to purchase and install a firewall (i.e. a Sonicwall) at the client site, get static IP addresses from Comcast, and program one of them into the firewall that you've set up.
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Mark LitinOwnerAuthor Commented:
Hi, and thanks for your insight.

The client has a newer router (an ASUS) that can be employed with which I can disable SIP ALG.  I can avoid double natting if I turn off DHCP on the Comcast side.  Does that sound like a decent plan?
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masnrockCommented:
If you don't have static IP addresses from Comcast, then you're stuck doing double NAT to try to accomplish what you'd like. And of course, if you disable NAT and all of that goodness on the ASUS, you're not going to get to test disabling SIP ALG.

If you have static address, NAT from the Comcast gateway is a non issue because your ASUS would have a static public address.
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nociSoftware EngineerCommented:
A switch will never filter IP traffic. so that will hardly help you.
VLANS can be done on the switch, but you first need a router to split the traffic to the right VLANs
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Mark LitinConnect With a Mentor OwnerAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your insights, masnrock and noci.

The client has a static IP, so I'll direct the router to that and block SIP ILG at that level.

We'll look into VLANs if still needed after the prior step.

Thanks.
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nociSoftware EngineerCommented:
For VLAN's you will need managed switch btw.
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Mark LitinOwnerAuthor Commented:
Yup.  Thanks.
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Mark LitinOwnerAuthor Commented:
Directing the router to use the static IP ignoring the Comcast gateway did the trick in letting the phones be used without the prior static.
I will be setting up a VLN to isolate the phones from the rest of the traffic.

Thanks.
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Mark LitinOwnerAuthor Commented:
Thanks to all for the solution.  Directing the router to the static IP from the ISP worked perfectly.
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