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Stress testing SSDs

I want to stress test ssds so when I put one in a client's computer it doesn't come back to me in three months.  I use Seatools for Windows but it doesn't do the job.  I just downloaded Diskspd.  It's too complex for my needs. Is there any reasonably simple tool that I can set running for X amount of time to get a drive to fail if it's going to fail?  What amount of time would that be?  Without damaging the drive or significantly cutting down on the life of the drive.  I use a Dell Optiplex 7040 running Win10 Pro, Intel I5, 16GB RAM and EVO 960 NVME to test drives.  
Thanks,
Al
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Alan Silverman
Asked:
Alan Silverman
4 Solutions
 
noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
Well, stress test for SSD means writing data onto it in a circle. I have seen such test running two weeks on PND SSD drive and the drive after these tests reduced the write speed drastically. Though the read speed was quite the same. And PND did not want to replace the drive cause this drive was not intended for such tests.
Why not just perform the test with a program designed for the SSD like Intel Toolbox for Intel SSD or Samsung Magician for Samsung drives and then send the drive to a customer.
The stress test will not answer your question - will the drive fail in two or six months? Every hardware part can fail.
What is most important for you is that when you send the hardware - it works fine. If it fails later - that's life just replace it.
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ITguy565Commented:
Stress Testing an SSD is not the best of ideas. Unless you are going to loop it and see when that particular drive fails. This though will only give you a general baseline of what the failure rate is on that particular drive.

A SSD is already limited in Read and Write Cycles out of the box, putting it into read/write loop will reduce the life expectancy of the drive causing that computer to come back to you.
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ITguy565Commented:
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John TsioumprisSoftware & Systems EngineerCommented:
Usually is better on "investing" to stress test a SSD that reduces health to buy an additional mechanical HDD and install a backup application that backups the data on specific time periods...
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andyalderCommented:
I don't think the Evo 960 is the drive you want to test but it will do as an example.

From manufacturer's spec:
Sequential Write Speed 1,900 MB/sec
Warranty (1TB)  400 TBW

1900 MB/s = 114GB/minute = 6.84TB / hour = 164TB/day

So if you test it constantly for 3 days that should be enough to expire the warranty. (Actually you would get away with quite a bit longer because the quoted write speed is greater than you would get during continuous test.
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ITguy565Commented:
I think we are all in agreement that

A SSD is already limited in Read and Write Cycles out of the box, putting it into read/write loop will reduce the life expectancy of the drive causing that computer to come back to you.
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Alan SilvermanOwnerAuthor Commented:
That answers my question.  No stress testing for me.  
Thanks,
Alan
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