Will migrating from SBS 2011/Server 2008 R2 to Server 2019 be supported?

I know this is a very new topic, but does anyone know if it will be supported to migrate from SBS 2011 Standard, which runs on Server 2008 R2, to Server 2019?  Server 2019 will debut by the second half of this year, and my organization is planning to upgrade our infrastructure around the same time, so I am now questioning on whether to wait for 2019 or just move to 2016.  I can't find any information on whether there will be a supported upgrade/migration path from SBS 2011/Server 2008 R2 to Server 2019.  

Any information is appreciated.  

Thanks
ColumbiaMarketingAsked:
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Microsoft has not announced any of that yet, but 2016 supported 2003, so I think you'll be okay as far as the OS goes. But it is a gamble. Nothing is final until it is finished. Exchange is another matter.
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ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
My current plan is to migrate our Exchange 2010 instance to Server 2016/Exchange 2016, then migrate the SBS domain controller to Server 2016 afterwards.  This is more or less supported with Server 2016, but I really woudn't be surprised if Server 2012/2012 R2 is the minimum required to migrate to Server 2019 once it's out.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Keep in mind, when you purchase your volume license for Windows Server, you will have downgrade rights, so *IF* 2019 ISN'T supported, you can simply install 2016.  And 2019 was just announced 2 days ago... there's still relatively little information on what will and won't be supported.  Further, support changes over time and until it's released, there's no guarantee that something will be supported or not.  They could announce support today but pull it before release.
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McKnifeCommented:
Define "migrate". If you expect to be able to do an inplace upgrade, this will not work.
Setting up a 2019 DC next to 2008 R2 and promote it as DC and then demote 2008 R2 will very likely be no problem at all.
Jumping directly from exchange 2010 to anything higher than 2016 will not work, you will have to take a step in between (Ex2010->Ex2016->Ex2019)
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ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
No, I wasn't planning to do any inplace upgrades.  I was planning to install the new servers next to the old ones, then transfer all FSMO/roles over, and demote the old ones, as you mentioned.
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ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
Out of curiosity, what is the reason that migrating from Exchange 2010 to a version greater than 2016 won't be supported?
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McKnifeCommented:
Exchange never let you jump more than 2 versions ahead.
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ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
Oh I did not know that.  Is there a technical reason for it or is it simply a best practice so Microsoft doesn't support it?
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McKnifeCommented:
Ask MS :-) Maybe they simply don't support it since very few people would want that (that= "letting your exchange grow stone old before upgrading to the cutting edge new version")
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ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
Haha, yeah that does make sense from a technical standpoint.  With that being said, I don't think I'll wait for a fully functional Server 2019/Exchange 2019 (or whatever they call it) version before moving forward with our upgrade.  Thank you for mentioning the Exchange upgrade best practices as that will essentially be a huge factor for us now.
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McKnifeCommented:
Take into consideration that the "step in between" will not require a licensed product. So you can go from 2010 to the evaluation version of 2016 and then migrate to your licensed 2019-
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ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
That is a great idea McKnife.  Do you know if two instances of Exchange can be installed side-by-side, or should there be an Exchange 2016 interim server while it's migrated over to 2019 on a different server?
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McKnifeCommented:
You have 2010, install 16, migrate to 16, decommission 10, install 19, migrate to 19, decommission 16.
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