What are the required CAL's for Server 2016 With Exchange 2016?

We are planning to deploy a Windows Server 2016 domain controller with Exchange 2016 and just wanted to clear up a licensing concern.  We have 50 users that will need CAL's, so in this type of deployment, will I need to purchase 50 Windows Server 2016 CAL's as well as 50 separate Exchange 2016 CAL's also?  I believe this is what we will need but just wanted to make sure since the Exchange CAL's appear to be almost double the cost as Server 2016 user CAL's depending on where you look.  

Thank you
ColumbiaMarketingAsked:
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
The usual disclaimer stranger son the internet are bad sources for legal advice. And licensing is certainly a legal issue.

With that said, yes you need windows and exchange CALs. Exchange CALs do not supercede or replace windows CALs. They are additive.

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timgreen7077Exchange EngineerCommented:
yes you will need to purchase Windows server cal and exchange standard or enterprise cals. 50 and 50
timgreen7077Exchange EngineerCommented:
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Hypercat (Deb)Commented:
Yes, you need both Windows and Exchange CALs for each user.  The Exchange CALs can be either Standard or Enterprise.  The main functions that are provided by Enterprise over Standard Exchange CALs are online archiving, and some advanced security features like DLP and IPC.  You purchase a Standard CAL and then if you want the Enterprise features you purchase an Enterprise CAL as an add-on to the Standard CAL. I'm not 100% sure as things sometimes change, but I believe you can purchase a Standard CAL for all users and then only purchase the Enterprise CAL for those users who need the advanced features.  This would be something you'd want to check with a reseller or directly with Microsoft sales before making a decision about the types of Exchange CALs you need.
ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
That's a good question.  Does anyone else know if an Exchange Enterprise CAL is in addition to a Standard CAL or can you choose one or the other?
timgreen7077Exchange EngineerCommented:
you can choose one or the other but standard is the norm and you can purchase the enterprise as an add-on if you will need users to access certain features.
Cliff GaliherCommented:
It isn't one or the other last I checked. It also is additive. Every enterprise CALsl requires a standard CAL "under" it so to speak.
McKnifeCommented:
So are you using exchange enterprise? If not, you should look at the price of the core cal suite: http://download.microsoft.com/download/3/D/4/3D42BDC2-6725-4B29-B75A-A5B04179958B/Licensing_Core_CAL_and_Enterprise_Suite.pdf
  The Core CAL Suite is equivalent to the following licenses:  

     Windows Server CAL
 SharePoint Server Standard CAL  
 Exchange Server Standard CAL 
     System Center Configuration Manager Client Management License
 System Center Endpoint Protection Client Management License
 Skype for Business Server Standard CAL
 
ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
At this time I am not planning to use Enterprise.  I'll definitely look into this because if it's cheaper than purchasing a user Server CAL and Exchange CAL separately then that's a no brainer.
Hypercat (Deb)Commented:
Just confirming that the Enterprise CAL is in addition to the Standard CAL according to current documentation that I just checked. As I said above but not too clearly: you purchase a Standard CAL for everyone.  I think but am not 100% sure that you need to purchase the Enterprise CAL add-on only for those people who will actually use the features (i.e., online archiving, etc.) that are included with the Enterprise license.  Also, as far as I know, in order for Outlook users to be able to open their online archive folders in Outlook they need to be running the Pro version of Outlook/Office. Otherwise, the online archive will only be available in the Outlook Web App.
McKnifeCommented:
" I'll definitely look into this because if it's cheaper than purchasing a user Server CAL and Exchange CAL separately then that's a no brainer." - to give you an idea: we paid roughly 400US$ per user for the core CAL suite.
ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
That's what I was worried about.  As of right now we would only have the need for Server CAL and Exchange CAL features.  The other benefits in the suite would most likely go unused in our organization it seems.
McKnifeCommented:
Ok, and a server CAL for any of your servers + an exchange CAL is less than 400 USD per person?
ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
At the resellers we've been looking at, we can get a Server CAL for roughly $35-40 and an Exchange CAL for about $85.  So that's only $125 at the most per user.  The prices vary depending on where you go, but regardless that seems like a far cheaper option than a Core CAL Suite license.
McKnifeCommented:
And you are aware that we are talking about software assurance products that need to be renewed regularly? For how many years would these 125$ hold?
McKnifeCommented:
And how many servers, just DC and Exchange, no file server, WSUS, and so on? Need CALs for for all of them if you don't have them already.
ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
That's what we are currently looking into.  If the cost of a file server and WSUS, for example, pushes the licenses closer to the cost of the suite CAL's, then maybe that would be an option at that point.
McKnifeCommented:
I suppose so :-) The high cost of 400 USD was just the initial cost. Every 2 (or was it three?) years, we have to pay an additional 125 USD per user for the core cal suite software assurance.
ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
I appreciate the insight into the licensing.  It really is baffling just how expensive things can get depending on your needs/wants.
ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
McKnife, say I wanted to virtualize the 2016 domain controller on one VM, and the Exchange 2016 server on a separate VM.  I'm assuming under this deployment I would not only need to purchase User CAL's for the domain controller and Exchange server, but also User CAL's just to authenticate to the separate Exchange server?  So basically, 50 user cals for domain controller, 50 user cals for Exchange server, and another 50 Exchange CAL's, is that correct?
McKnifeCommented:
No, 50 Exchange Server CAL would be enough, no additional server CALs for that server unless he is used for other server roles.
ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
That's good to know.  What about WSUS and a file server, like you mentioned?  If I split those two services off to individual virtual machines, would I need User CAL's for each one of them, or will the initial 50 User CAL's for the domain controller be sufficient?  I guess I was under the impression that if you purchased User CAL's for a domain controller you can split off print/file/wsus/etc. services to other servers that's in the same domain without having to purchase an additional User CAL for each one of them.  Maybe this assumption is totally wrong?
McKnifeCommented:
Yes, that assumption is totally wrong indeed and you should have a talk with a sales person. You need CALs per server and that's why for many, that have at least 3 different servers + Exchange, the core CAL suite is the cheapest option.
Cliff GaliherCommented:
A windows user CAL is assigned to a user and covers *all* windows servers (of that version or lower) within the organization.  So 1 server, (DC)...2 servers (DC and Exchange), or 20 servers (SQL cluster!)....one user CAL for *that* user (a physical person) for all those servers.
McKnifeCommented:
As you can see... you need to talk to sales and or microsoft. My info is totally different and I had those talks, so...
ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
Seems there are conflicting views on this.  I'll definitely talk to a sales rep to clarify what is really needed.  I just thought that what Cliff said was the case, one User CAL will cover a user for all servers under the same organization as long as it's the same server version or lower, with Exchange/SQL of course requiring their own.
Cliff GaliherCommented:
Indeed. From my very first comment on this question:  "The usual disclaimer stranger son the internet are bad sources for legal advice. And licensing is certainly a legal issue."

I am a stranger to you.  McKnife is a stranger to you. How would you decide who is right.

With that said, I suspect it is how the salesperson interpreted "multiple servers."

The core CAL suite is a savings if you run more than 3 *DIFFERENT* server products.  Aka 1) Windows  2) Exchange and 3) Skype for Business.

Three server PRODUCTS is different than three different SERVERS.   The core suite *is* a big savings for shops that run a heavy Microsoft stack.  That's my interpretation.
Cliff GaliherCommented:
From Microsoft's licensing brief (emphasis mine):

The Windows Server 2016 licensing model includes both Cores + Client Access Licenses (CALs). Each user and/or device accessing a licensed Windows Server Standard, Datacenter, or Multipoint edition requires a Windows Server CAL or Windows Server and Remote Desktop Services CAL. A Windows Server CAL gives a user or device the right to access any edition of Windows Server of the same or earlier version. Each Window Server CAL allows access to multiple licenses of Windows Server.
Edition

http://download.microsoft.com/download/7/2/9/7290EA05-DC56-4BED-9400-138C5701F174/WS2016LicensingDatasheet.pdf
ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
I just spoke with a Microsoft licensing sales rep and they confirmed what Cliff has said.  Each user CAL for Server 2016 will license that user for subsequent servers, like a file server (just storage) or WSUS running on separate virtual machines in the same organization.  Obviously you would still need separate Exchange/SQL CAL's if you were planning to implement those.
McKnifeCommented:
Alright and thank you both. So what I had saved to memory seems to be partly wrong, I will have to revise what led us to buying that core cal suite, which license experts at the reseller advised us to buy (for exchange, file-, domain- and update services as well as sharepoint under the assumption that we would want to continue using those with the latest versions in the future).
ColumbiaMarketingAuthor Commented:
In all honesty it's really confusing no matter who you talk to.  Not only do you have to consider the user/device CAL's, but then there is the actual server operating system licenses as well as licenses for each server hardware core you need to license along with it.  

I appreciate everyone's feedback on this.
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