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How to differentiate between Consumer SSD and Enterprise SSD

How can I differentiate between Consumer SSD and Enterprise SSD?
Is there any guide available.   After purchasing a Storage Array how can I confirm if the SSDs  provided are  Consumer or Enterprise.
Thank you.
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cgeorgeisaac
Asked:
cgeorgeisaac
2 Solutions
 
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Remove them from the SAN and check the specifications written on the devices
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
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cgeorgeisaacAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the link.  What will the Consumer SSD specs specifically mention compared to the Enterprise SSD specs.
Is it possible to get a screen shot of both.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
The technology is different between consumer and enterprise to ensure longer endurance and error correction

In some cases the actual flash chips could be different

What models do you have also consumer flash will not operate in SANs
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Dr. KlahnPrincipal Software EngineerCommented:
Enterprise grade drives are SLC (best) or TLC.  If the SSD specs say "MLC", for "this is what we're going to use in our server" purposes it's consumer grade no matter what the label says.  Due to the fuzz at the edges of the level bands, MLC technology has a short life and is inherently less reliable than SLC or TLC.

The same chips can be used as SLC, TLC or MLC.  A promo blurb stating "We use only Brand S chips!" means little unless the level technology is also disclosed.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
And to check that with your SAN you will need to remove units and check model numbers!
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cgeorgeisaacAuthor Commented:
Dr.Klahn - That gives a clear distinction between Enterprise and Consumer SSD.  Appreciate your guidance both.
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andyalderCommented:
Clear distinction but it seems to be shuffled up. Since SLC stores one bit in a cell, MLC stores 2 bits and TLC stores 3 bits you would think TLC are the "fuzziest" of the three. For example https://www.micron.com/products/nand-flash/tlc-mlc-and-slc-devices only lists SLC and MLC as enterprise, not TLC. There again Samsung produce "enterprise" 3D TLC SSDs, you'll note that they are lower capacity than the consumer equivalent giving more spare space for garbage collection and redundancy.

Most important difference as far as I'm concerned is the power loss protection capacitors on the enterprise SSDs. How the bits are stored is of little importance so long as the performance and reliability are comparable.
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cgeorgeisaacAuthor Commented:
That is an excellent point Andyalder.  Will certainly keep that in mind.   Of course, to add to that All Flash suffers "Wear and Tear".  Many thanks.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Have you seen any wear out yet!?
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cgeorgeisaacAuthor Commented:
As per Industry Experts: flash memory erases used space by over-writing what is already there, which consumes one of the limited number of writes that cell can have and reduces its usable life. It also takes time to perform this action, which reduces overall performance.

Take a look at the following links:
https://www.quora.com/How-and-why-does-flash-memory-wear-out
https://searchstorage.techtarget.com/podcast/How-NAND-flash-degrades-and-what-vendors-do-to-increase-SSD-endurance
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
But have you personally observed a SSD stop working what happens when it has written to all the bells does it email you?

You would have long since retired the equipment!
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
We all know it wears out

But what happens when it's worn out ?

That seems the mystery?
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cgeorgeisaacAuthor Commented:
You asked me a question and I have attempted to clarify to the best of my knowledge and experience.
If SSD stop working it could be for other reasons.  Have I seen a SSD stop working - yes I have. However, it could be for various reasons -  like faulty components, heavy blow, water damage, short circuits, failed firmware upgrades, etc.

The point I am trying to make,  is over a period of time SSD's performance does get affected weather it is  - SLC, MLC, eMLC or TLC.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Yes it does!
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