Expanding OS drive in HyperV server

Disk2vhdHi,
 
I have a server where I have C, E and F drive. C and F are from the same 600GB (2x600GB on Raid 1). I allocated 200GB  for C Drive when I installed OS. Therefore, 361GB was free, so I assigned F Drive to it. So essentially C and F are from the same 600GB HD on RAID 1. E drive is on 1.08TB (4 x 600GB HDs on Raid 10) and contains only data.
When I ran Disk2vhd program as seen in the screenshot, it created two VHDX files - PCName-0.vhdx.
When creating a new virtual machine in HyperV server,  I used existing PCName-0.vhdx file first and then added PCName-1.vhdx as an additional IDE hard drive. When I booted this VM, it showed exactly the same drive letters (C, E and F) with same free space on each drive.

Now the situation:

I only have some 60GB of free space from C drive (OS) and I like to give 100GB additional space to C drive (now I have more space in HyperV server). So I made PCName-0.vhdx hard drive 100GB bigger than current size in Hyper-V settings, but when I went to Disk Management, I discovered I could only make F drive bigger (not C Drive) because 100GB free space was adjacent to F drive.

So I figure that I need to create 3 VHDX files in Disk2vhd program.

 (1) system reserved and C drive  PCName-0.vhdx
 (2) F Drive - 361GB -PCName-1.vhdx
 (3) E Drive 1116GB"  - PCName-2.vhdx

 My question is if it ok to run Disk2vhd program three times so that I can create separate VHDX file only for OS; therefore I can expand this VHDX in Hyper-V Settings?
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sgleeAsked:
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
WHY would you partition a VHD?  That's pointless and just creates problems for you like this.  I recommend adding a new VHD, mirror the F: drive to it, then break the mirror and remove the F: drive from the partition.  Then you can expand the C: drive on the VM.

HOWEVER, that's silly in my opinion.  WHY is your C: drive taking up 120 GB?  Are you not properly managing it?  In MOST cases (VAST MAJORITY) a properly managed server won't typically use more than 80 GB of space making 120 GB more than sufficient (none of my VMs EXCEPT for RDS servers) ever get more than 127 GB C: drive VHDs).
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
@Lee
". .. adding a new VHD, mirror the F: drive to it, then break the mirror and remove the F: drive from the partition." --> I like that idea.

"WHY is your C: drive taking up 120 GB? " --> it is SBS2011 with 24GB of RAM and I moved Exchange database/log files and WSUS folder to E Drive to free up space on C drive. Here is the breakdown:

1. Paging file: 25GB
2. C:\Program Data: 10GB
3. C:\Program Files (x86): 2.5GB
4. C:\Program Files: 38.4GB
5. C:\Users: 2GB
6. C:\Windows: 44GB

I checked other SBS2011 installations and they are about the same. The buck of space is taken up by C:\Program Data/Program Files/ Windows folders - 92GB. Other sites may be about 10GB less or so.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Even my SBS servers don't use more than 127 GB of space on the C: drive.  Move the page file off (leave a 1 GB pagefile for a mini dump).  Program Files is HUGE.  What's taking up the space there?  On an SBS server, that shouldn't generally be more than 12 GB.

The following screen shot is taken from one of my SBS Servers that was installed 6.5 years ago... The C: drive is ONLY the OS and programs.  All data lives on other drives.

SBS Drive Usage
Clean things up - you know you can!
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
@Lee
"Move the page file off (leave a 1 GB pagefile for a mini dump). " --> Change the paging file size from 25GB to 1GB completely or move it to another partition while leaving only 1GB in C Drive?
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
"Program Files is HUGE.  What's taking up the space there?  "--> Here is the break down.

C:\Program Files\Microsoft\Exchange Server: 4.3GB
C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server 18GB
C:\Program Files\Symantec\Backup Exec 2GB
C:\Program Files\Windows Small Business Server 7.4GB

There were some old exchange database files that were temporarily created when repair was being performed. I cleaned them up. Now C;\Program Files folder size is 35.6GB
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
SBSMonitoringC:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL10_50.SBSMONITORING\MSSQL\DATA has 15.1GB and I see the list of complains about the size of this database on google. I need to find an article that shows how to shrink this database.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Move the SBS Monitoring database off the C: drive.

This is the database of information related to SBS Monitoring.  If everything is generally good, you can reset it:
https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/sbs/2011/08/22/how-to-recreate-the-sbsmonitoring-database/
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
@Lee
I saw that article while doing my own research. I will try to do both MOVE and Cleanup (C:windowstempCreate-SBSMonitoringDb.ps1)  on a test SBS2011 this evening and report back.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
@Lee
"Move the page file off (leave a 1 GB pagefile for a mini dump). " --> Change the paging file size from 25GB to 1GB completely or move it to another partition while leaving only 1GB in C Drive?
Leave a 1 GB Pagefile on the C: drive, create a new 24 GB Pagefile on the E: drive.
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
I am just curious if spreading paging files over two different drives a good practice?
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Good?  It's preferred!  :-)  Provided they are different PHYSICAL drives, not drive letters. Ideally, for the VM, I'd create a separate VHD on a separate physical disk JUST for the pagefile.  The following guidance doesn't address VMs which, because things are virtual may require different thinking at times, but it's still an excellent guide.

Tip: Learn Best Practices for Optimizing the Virtual Memory Configuration
https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff382717.aspx
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
“ It's preferred! “ —> great!
“ I'd create a separate VHD on a separate physical disk JUST for the pagefile.” —> I will do that when I actually move this server to hyper-v.
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
@Lee
I tried two of your suggestions in my TEST SBS2011 environment (which is a duplicate of production SBS2011 server that is in discussion)
(1) Changed Page File Size on C drive to 1GB and set up the rest in E drive (completely different hard drive) & rebooted.
(2) Reset the SBSMonitoring SQL database by running C:windowst\emp\Create-SBSMonitoringDb.ps1. Now
C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server folder size is down to 3.25GB from 18GB.
                                       Production SBS2011   Temp SBS2011
                                        ------------------------------   ----------------------
SBSMonitoring.mdf           11.6 GB                             3.3 MB
SBSMonitoring_log.LDF       3.8 GB                            768 KB

Thank you.

Question: I read an EE article where EE expert said that SQLAgent$SBSMONITORING service should be set to start "Automatically" (ID: 18067146 2006-12-04) if the database is not purged automatically.  When I check Services.msc, SQLAgent$SBSMONITORING is not running and is "Disabled". Should I turned it on and set it to start Automatically?

Also in the same article, you mentioned the following:
Moving Data Folders for Windows Small Business Server 2003
http://www.lwcomputing.com/tips/linker.asp?id=41

But when I clicked the link, it saw this an error
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
@Lee
Also since I reset the database,  how does it affect  reporting and alerts managed by  SBS 2011 Console?
I have not created any reports of my own, but once a week, I get two emails from SBS 2011 about "over status of the server".
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
SQL Monitoring@Lee,

 I was not clear as to which SQL service is "Disabled".
SQL Server (SBSMONITORING) is set to start Automatically and Started.
It was SQL Serve Agent (SBSMONITORING) was "Disabled".
I see the same status in every SBS2011 that I manage. So I take it that it is by design.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Question: I read an EE article where EE expert said that SQLAgent$SBSMONITORING service should be set to start "Automatically" (ID: 18067146 2006-12-04) if the database is not purged automatically.  When I check Services.msc, SQLAgent$SBSMONITORING is not running and is "Disabled". Should I turned it on and set it to start Automatically?

I would set it to automatic.

Thanks about the link, it's fixed, however, Microsoft removed that content so it's no longer available.
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
@Lee
Thanks for your insight.
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