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Excel file size difference

I have these two Excel files attached. One is a chart I saved out of PPT. The other is the content of that chart saved to a separate Excel file. The problem I am having is that the file size of the Chart file is much larger than the manually created Book1 file that I made with the content I wanted from the Chart file. I have a PPT file that has several several charts like this, so I am trying to clean the chart files in PPT of whatever is creating this extra space so that it will in turn reduce the size of my PPT file. I have already tried the embedded font steps and everything else suggested to reduce it (these charts must remain Excel editable too as opposed to pictures). So can someone tell me what is creating more size on the Chart file compared to the Book1 file and how to get rid of it? We are using Office 2013.
Chart-in-Microsoft-PowerPoint.xlsx
Book1.xlsx
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mrosier
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mrosier
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3 Solutions
 
zvitamConsultantCommented:
I don't know the reason for the size diffrence, all I can tell is that when I copied the contents of the bigger excel to a clean excel file in it's size became similiar to Book1.
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mrosierAuthor Commented:
@zvitam yeah and that is killin' me repeated enough times. I appreciate your feedback either way.
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Martin LissOlder than dirtCommented:
If you do click Ctrl+End in each workbook you'll find that in the Chart... workbook, Excel for some reason thinks the last cell is CO917. Why it thinks that I don't know. I tried a couple of standard techniques for cleaning up workbooks (that you can find in EE and elsewhere) but they didn't work. You can however save it as an xlsb file and that will make it smaller.
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mrosierAuthor Commented:
@Martin thanks for trying, the problem is that core problem is these are PPT charts, I don't think saving as is going to fix it there. But how can you tell there is content there? I don't see anything in the value field.
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Martin LissOlder than dirtCommented:
I don't think saving as is going to fix it there.
In case there's confusion, I suggested saving it as an xlsB file.

But how can you tell there is content there?
I can't, but Excel thinks there is somewhere in that row.
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Martin LissOlder than dirtCommented:
I don't think saving as is going to fix it there.
In case there's confusion, I suggested saving it as an xlsB file.

But how can you tell there is content there?
I can't, but Excel thinks there is somewhere in that row.
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mrosierAuthor Commented:
@Martin Sorry, can I use the XLSB procedure in conjunction with the PPT chart?
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Echo_SCommented:
How did the data get into the chart sheet in PowerPoint? Did you copy-paste it from Excel?

I looked at both of the files in an XML editor, and I can see a couple of differences. A ton of the cells in the Chart-in-Microsoft-PowerPoint.xlsx file have cell references and styles, and I'm sure that contributes to the file size difference. Additionally, the active rangeof the Chart-in-Microsoft-PowerPoint.xlsx seems to be A1:CO917 where in Book 1.xlsx, it's A1:I24. (That's a capital I as in eye.) If I create a default column chart in PPT and save out the Excel file and then review it in an XML editor, the range is A1:D5, which is the range the dummy data is contained in.

Anyway, I would guess that the extra 917 empty rows are causing your file size hit.
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Echo_SCommented:
To be clear, the extra 900-ish rows each get cell references and stuff in the XML, which is why they're contributing to the size. That is all I meant by "A ton of the cells in the Chart-in-Microsoft-PowerPoint.xlsx file have cell references and styles, and I'm sure that contributes to the file size difference."
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mrosierAuthor Commented:
@Echo_S Definitely the rows. AND it turns out these rows were created because the format type of the cells within it were set to percentage as opposed to the default when created which made Excel recognize these rows/columns as part of the file. So I reset the format to all these cells back to default general, deleted all the rows as a check, saved, and the file size is much better now. Thanks!
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Echo_SCommented:
Great!
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mrosierAuthor Commented:
Martin pointed out where the range was stopping and Echo made me think about more than just cell values. Thanks!!
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Martin LissOlder than dirtCommented:
You’re welcome and I’m glad I was able to help.

If you expand the “Full Biography” section of my profile you’ll find links to some articles I’ve written that may interest you.

Marty - Microsoft MVP 2009 to 2017
              Experts Exchange Most Valuable Expert (MVE) 2015, 2017
              Experts Exchange Top Expert Visual Basic Classic 2012 to 2017
              Experts Exchange Top Expert VBA (current)
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