Who knows their enterprise level SSDs?

Intel SSD for Video Surveillance recording.

I want to try using an Intel P4600 2TB SSD drive for recording on my video surveillance system. Traditionally SSD was not recommended for this as it is such a write intensive task. These newer drives seem like they might be better suited. I need to know if I have everything right here, how well do you know SSDs???

Actual Drive:
https://ark.intel.com/products/96999/Intel-SSD-DC-P4600-Series-2_0TB-12-Height-PCIe-3_1-x4-3D1-TLC

Life Time:
This drive is rated for 11.08 Petabytes Written, or 11,800 Terabytes over it's lifetime? Warranty period is 5 years (1825 days). Which means it can handle 6.47 Terabytes per day?

Speed:
It has 1.61 GB/s Maximum write. 3.2 GB/s Max Read. The old way of recording the video would be to put it to a RAID 10 array consisting of 10 x 15K SAS drives. Not counting for storage space, would this single drive be able to replace that entire 10 disk array?

Who can check my numbers and see if I am crazy or heading in the right direction?

Thanks,

Brian.
bselltizAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
andyalderConnect With a Mentor Commented:
If you've already bought it then fair enough, too late to change your mind now.

Question - Am I correct in that it means it can handle 6.47 Terabytes per day?
It can handle more than that but would be worn out in less than 5 years if it did.

Question - Not counting for storage space, would this single drive be able to replace that entire 10 disk array?
You'll get about 150 IOPS per disk so let's say 100% write 10 disks in RAID 10 = 750 IOPS. that's slightly less than 196650 IOPS that you get from that card.

Question - Do you know how to determine the maximum write transfer rate of 10 of these drives in a Raid 10
Video is normally sequential but with 100 cameras it'll be more like random I/O. Smart Array controllers scale fairly linearly for a small number of disks (and 10 is small considering you can connect external shelves to them) so the write speed will be almost 5 times as fast as for one disk. Read speeds would be faster than that because it can read from all 10 disks.
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Martin MillerConnect With a Mentor CTOCommented:
Brian,

I think you have a handle on most of this by the way you posted. For video recording and playback...  I would NOT use singular SSD drives, any vendor,  for high availability and reliability over a long-term use case, e.g. more than 2 years.  Raid-10 or higher, e.g 50/60.... but you increase cost/storage.

Also, there is an MTBF number  2 million hours, if you want to trust this... use to compare with other vendors, Western Digital, Seagate.

Fujitsu and Toshiba had, past tense, more reliable drives... IMHO. This may be dated opinion.

Intel is using it's own semiconductors, other vendors may or may not be using their own. The delta in consumer grade and enterprise is blurry, when you know you can create larger raids with consumer level drives to accomplish Enterprise reliability.
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DavidPresidentCommented:
Two mechanical drives configured as a RAID1 will cost you less money and provide redundancy, and in grand scheme of things, run at same speed of SSD. (Assuming the recorder will support that)

If that is not an option then that SSD is Good enough.
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bselltizAuthor Commented:
David, can explain how it is possible that two drives would match the SSD's performance? I thought the SSD was vastly superior in terms of speed. I am not worried about cost and redundancy in the scope of this topic.
Thanks.
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DavidPresidentCommented:
Simple, because even a USB stick can record data faster than the surveillance camera is capable of recording
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bselltizAuthor Commented:
David, this and most other video surveillance systems have more than one camera. This one happens to have over 100.
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bselltizAuthor Commented:
Hey Martin,

Do you know how to determine the maximum write transfer rate of 10 of these drives in a Raid 10?
http://www8.hp.com/h20195/v2/GetPDF.aspx/c04168396.pdf
The raid 0 part of the raid 10 array splits the writing task across 5 drives but I do not understand what that translates into as far as write transfer speeds.

Thanks.
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DavidPresidentCommented:
Write transfer has multiple variables.   The make/model of controller, what slot it is in, the number of lanes; is it full or half duplex; SAS vs SATA; what bus controller chip do you have; all that before you even consider the specs on whatever drive you choose, and all that before looking at the controller

The way to approach this question is to find out how much sustained read/write throughput you need to record everything.    You're doing it backwards.   If you guess wrong, you either throw money away, or you lose data.

So first find out what minimum level sustained read/write throughput you need, then we can figure how to get there.
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bselltizAuthor Commented:
David,
Understood, this is what I have available:
Throughput total needed - 120 MB / sec
Estimated IOPS - 801
I wanted to install the SSD into an NVMe compatible PCIe riser card in an HP DL380 Gen10.
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andyalderCommented:
You don't need a NVMe riser, they are used to split 4 (or more) PCIe lanes so that they can be cabled to the front disk bays. see the cabling layouts at http://h22208.www2.hpe.com/eginfolib/servers/CableMatrix/GUID-2F1298D0-F2B9-422C-95B7-92B18F63286D.html
The Intel PCIe board is similar to HPE PCIe Workload Accelerator Options and if you read the quickspecs it does not say they need to be on NVMe risers.

I'd rather use HPE branded write intensive SSDs, SAS or SATA would do if you only need 120MB/s
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bselltizAuthor Commented:
Hi all, to clarify, here is everything I need to know on this topic:

Throughput total needed - 120 MB / sec
Estimated IOPS - 801
I am installing the SSD into an NVMe compatible PCIe riser card in an HP DL380 Gen10. This is already done.
I am not worried about cost and redundancy in the scope of this topic.

Actual Drive:
https://ark.intel.com/products/96999/Intel-SSD-DC-P4600-Series-2_0TB-12-Height-PCIe-3_1-x4-3D1-TLC

Life Time:
This drive is rated for 11.08 Petabytes Written, or 11,800 Terabytes over it's lifetime? Warranty period is 5 years (1825 days).
Question - Am I correct in that it means it can handle 6.47 Terabytes per day?

Speed:
It has 1.61 GB/s Maximum write. 3.2 GB/s Max Read. The old way of recording the video would be to put it to a RAID 10 array consisting of 10 x 15K SAS drives.
Question - Not counting for storage space, would this single drive be able to replace that entire 10 disk array?

Comparison:
Compared to traditional disks
Question - Do you know how to determine the maximum write transfer rate of 10 of these drives in a Raid 10?
http://www8.hp.com/h20195/v2/GetPDF.aspx/c04168396.pdf
The raid 0 part of the raid 10 array splits the writing task across 5 drives but I do not understand what that translates into as far as write transfer speeds.

Thanks so much!
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Philip ElderConnect With a Mentor Technical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
As a frame of reference...

One modern 4Kn (Advanced Format) 10K SAS drive can sustain 300MB/Second all on its own.

NearLine 7200 RPM SAS drives can sustain about 150MB/Second on its own depending on its Areal Density.

We have set up servers with 8x 10K SAS in RAID 6 and tested throughput to be an easily sustained 800MB/Second with about 250 IOPS to 450 IOPS per disk depending on how the storage stack is formatted.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
you need 801 iops per camera or overall? and is the 120MB/s the total or per camera?

What if the single SSD drive fails?
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bselltizAuthor Commented:
@andyadler - can you clarify your statement -You'll get about 150 IOPS per disk so let's say 100% write 10 disks in RAID 10 = 750 IOPS. that's slightly less than 196650 IOPS that you get from that card.

Not sure what the 196650 number references or how it relates to the 750 IOPS.

Thanks,
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bselltizAuthor Commented:
@Philip
Is that about 250 IOPS to 450 IOPS per disk or per the Raid 6 volume?
Thanks
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bselltizAuthor Commented:
@David
801 overall and 120MB (mega bytes) total.
Not worried about the SSD failing at this point as I can have a backup ready to go etc in a few minutes. I know it's not the norm but a new way of doing things I am contemplating.
Thanks
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andyalderConnect With a Mentor Commented:
196650 IOPS is the spec of the SSD, it was you that posted the link to it in the question. It is more IOPS than you get from an array of spinning disks.
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Philip ElderConnect With a Mentor Technical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
That's 250 IOPS to 450 IOPS _per disk_ in the RAID array.
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Gerald ConnollyCommented:
bselltiz - I think everybody is trying to point out that
a) that SSD is very expensive!
b) one drive doesnt give you any redundancy!
c) 120MB/s and 800IOPS is well within the capability of a much lower cost spinning rust solution that does have redundancy
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bselltizAuthor Commented:
Thank you Gerald, I agree with a & b they are just not relevant to this particular situation. In regard to c I am just making sure that I have all my ducks in a row before I invest a few thousand dollars on test equipment, the aim being to move away from the multi spinning disk solution we currently use and the ultimate goal to be increased performance.
Thanks.
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Gerald ConnollyCommented:
Test equipment?

If money isn’t an option then just buy another SSD and run them as a RAID-1, but don’t forget you probably need an archive strategy
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andyalderCommented:
Not easy to mirror as it's a PCIe standup card,
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