Exchange 2016, how many "inbox CALS" does it come with?

I have a quote from Dell on a server I am buying and they are quoting Exchange 2016 and asking how many inbox CALS we need.  Does this version come with any?

Microsoft Exchange Server 2016 Standard - License - 1 server -
Open License - Win - Single Language

Next question, we have been using Exchange 2007. It came as part of the SBS 2008. We haven't had to buy any Exchange CALS for that.  Any idea if that means we also don't need to buy CALS for 2016?
wfcrrAsked:
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
No CALs come with the product. You need to buy CALs.

If you bought SBS CALs previously  those CALs counted as exchange CALs for that purpose and that version. If you didn't buy SBS CALs then you may have been out of compliance the whole time.
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Wayne88Commented:
SBS2008 came with 5 CALs out of the box.  If you had more than 5 exchange users at any given time then you did not have sufficient licenses.
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wfcrrAuthor Commented:
so, does that just not get enforced?
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
I am tempted to say "does it matter?" Being legal shouldn't be a matter of whether you can get away with it.

But if you are wondering why you never saw errors, Microsoft has gone through periods of using a combination of audits and honor system.

That shouldn't be taken as encouragement to try and game the system.
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wfcrrAuthor Commented:
Has EE been taken over by nit wits?  Geesh, where did those geniuses put the points awards button now?  I cannot seem to find the buttons to select "Best solution" and "Assisted Solution".  Maybe this is a new idiot test...
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pgm554Commented:
No limit on how many users ,the catch is email DB's (5 in standard) and 50 in Enterprise.

As for SBS ,it was basically a paper license starting with 2008.
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wfcrrAuthor Commented:
So, do I technically just need one CAL? Are all users emails in one database, or is each person's email treated as a standalone database requiring a CAL?  I told Dell I needed 17 CALS (as a rough guess) and now I am thinking that is the wrong thing to tell them?  The price for 17 CALS was almost twice as much as the Exchange license.  That is absurd.  We only have 5 people here and we use a few other emails like "Service" and generic stuff like that. Seems ludicrous to pay almost 80.00 for each person to have a CAL.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Each real physical human being with a pulse needs a windows CAL and an Exchange Standard CAL. Shared mailboxes do not (so "Service" would not as long as all of the real humans who check "service" have CALs.)
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
And yes, most organizations pay more in CALs than they do the server license.  That's true for windows and Exchange.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
The DB standard vs enterprise has to do with the Exchange Server edition, not with the CALs.  Those are different situations.  Now is where we need to throw out the obligatory "advice on the internet" is not a valid way to get legal.  You should work with a partner to get the licenses.  Microsoft has a partner program, or you can call them directly. If you follow advice here (even mine) and later get audited and found to be wrong, "I read it on the internet" won't get you out of the big piracy fees you'll face.  And yes, audits happen.  While I am confident in the answers I am giving, I never recommend anybody take advice from the internet...again, not even mine.
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pgm554Commented:
If you authenticate to AD ,you need a server CAL.
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Wayne88Commented:
I agree with Cliff to get you properly quoted by an authorized MS vendor for the appropriate amount of CALs.

MS offers device and user CALs.  It can get confusing because "the prevailing licensing strategy used by most organizations has been….if you have more users than devices, purchase the lower number of required device CALs; alternatively…..if you have more devices than users, then buy the lower number of user-based CALs. The user CAL or device CAL licensing decision has become more complicated given changes in product usage scenarios such as access to email from any device, anywhere, including phones."

Then in some cases it may makes sense to have a mixture of both device and user CALs for MS products (usually for a much larger corporations and amount of users/devices).
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Case in point about taking advice on the internet:  No flame intended here...

Authenticating against AD is not the standard for whether a CAL is needed.  And hasn't been for a long time (it was back in ...2000?  I think it changed with 2003, but don't recall for sure...)

https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/volume-licensing/2014/03/10/licensing-how-to-when-do-i-need-a-client-access-license-cal/

Yup.  DHCP needs a CAL.  And that doesn't authenticate.  Which makes using Windows as a DHCP server on a guest network almost a non-starter.  I re-architected my guest networks over a decade ago because of that change (Back when b/g was standard, before n and ac) ...and in this day and age, probably for the better. I don't want guest devices seeing the server at all, even for DHCP.  But still, point being that old knowledge lingers, and can easily be given as "good advice" even by the best of us.
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