Python/MATLAB for financial engineering

Dear experts,

I am a chartered accountant, CIMA and CFA.

I have a lot of experience in writing excel formulae (the entire credit goes to this forum, thank you experts).

I now want to pursue Financial Engineering.

I am learning C, C++ now. Once I become well versed with these two languages, I will move to learning Python.

Now from robustness, depth and FE requirement is Python better or MATLAB

I am not sure I have the bandwidth to complete/learn both.

Till date I have been learning C and I did not struggle to pick up the synatax or logic.

Kindly advice.
ExcellearnerAsked:
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Duncan RoeSoftware DeveloperCommented:
Not wishing to dampen your enthusiasm in any way, but you might do better to get on to Python before tackling C++ or C. I just suspect you will be orders of magnitude more productive with Python rather than the lower-level languages. Plus, Python has a huge array of packages which you might find useful, available from https://pypi.org/
MATLAB is not free for professional use. But, there is a Python package called "matlab for python". The minimal documentation reports In actuality, all this is is a container for (Python packages) numpy & pylab. I went looking for the pylab package but couldn't find it. I already had numpy.
On the other hand, gnu octave is a free and open source alternative to matlab. I've skirted round it in the past, and it does seem to be pretty full-featured. There are lots of Python packages relating to octave. Just go to the site and type octave in the search box. In particular, I noticed oct2py which might be just what you want.

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